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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi this could be a daft question but after using the intake volt and other rapid chargers the car said it was fully charged but then when driving it seems the milage drops like a stone is it really charging the batteries properly?? Any thoughts tia
 

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I bet you do most of your charging at home, don't you? The GOM will give the range that the battery voltage suggests when charged at a slow speed. If charging faster, the battery voltage will appear higher for a given state of charge, and so GOM overestimates the range. Once disconnected, the battery voltage will settle down to a normal level, and so will look like you are dropping miles faster.
 

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GOMs vary, some like early Leafs are notorious liars, others like Hyundai's are reckoned pretty good. We need more info!
 

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Hyundai Ioniq 28
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Lots more data required before any meaningful suggestions can be made. Car, age, battery size and health. Weather, driving speed. What do you regard as 'normal' range and what is 'abnormal' after a Rapid charge?

Are you sure that you went to 100% on a Rapid as that can take a very long time. The last 10% can take as long as the first 90%. Some cars, and Rapid units, stop automatically at 85% for this reason.

With more info we might be able to suggest what's going on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Hi
Thanks yes nearly always charge at home it was the first time I’d used these chargers when charged showed 88% but GOM showed 180 which is what it is on a full charge 70mph cold around 1 degree 6month old e2008 we travelling on m5/6 from Plymouth was a very long drive with charge stops lol
 

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Yep that's what it is then. The battery was at 88% but the voltage had spiked fooling the GOM you were at 100%.

Very rapidly it dropped to realising it was at 88% - hopefully that rapid drop stopped and it was right after a few minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Hi
Unfortunately not we had 180 in tank travelled around 50/60 miles and GOM said it had about 40/50 in tank left so making it along trip getting it booked in to check batts seemed to need charging way to often
 

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So you say that the normal displayed miles when at 100% from the home charger is 180 miles.

Is that after the car has been driven mostly locally at urban speeds?

Have you ever been able to continually drive for 180 miles at 70mph on a very cold day?

Ever?

The Rapid stopped charging at 88% ( as I anticipated) which would normally give you 180 x 88%= 158miles. But this isn't normal. This is not local urban travel. It's motorway speed so that GOM estimate would be forced down to more like 120 on an 88% battery state.

You then drove 60 miles at 70 mph reducing that availability to 60 miles.

60 miles driven plus 60 miles estimated to be available equals the 120 miles that I estimated above.

I don't think that there is much wrong with the car. Just the usual weird GOM machinations. And a rapid drive on a cold day with a less than full battery.
 

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A quick Google says e-2008 has WLTP 206 miles, battery of 50 kWh of which 45 is usable.
Have a look at
Peugeot e-2008 SUV
where it says real range is highway-cold = 105 miles.

You have an EV with the aerodynamics of a brick, because it's SUV shaped. There are only about 2 EVs with decent aerodynamics capable of high speed but not killing the range, Model 3 & Ioniq.

You'll see 200 miles in summer if you don't exceed say 60 mph on motorways & aren't using heating or air con.
WLTP range isn't achievable at motorway 70 mph continuous speeds, unless you're able (and happy/comfortable/confident) to slipstream one of those super-fast coaches that whizz along at 70.

Belting along at 70 using heating in winter is going to drain the battery very fast, as you're finding. Nothing wrong with the car.

Wind resistance is the most easily adjusted/controlled "problem" EVs have. You can't do much about tyre drag, just choose low rolling-resistance ones & pump them higher rather than lower pressure. Nothing you can do about car's cross-section (maybe fold the mirrors in on motorways, some people do this!) and nothing you can do to reduce drag coefficient (except fold mirrors). You could fit lowered springs to the car, & notify insurance, which reduces cross-sectional area as this includes the area under the floorpan between the wheels, but the improvement will be tiny.

Speed's a different matter. Drag force goes up as the square of your speed, not linearly. So roughly, if you travel 10% faster, that's 20% extra force the motor has to apply. Drive at 70 rather than 55, That's 60% more force required. So over the fixed distance travelled, that's 60% more electricity used on this bit of the energy required.

Headwinds are similarly bad. 60 into a 20 mph headwind is effectively like driving at 80 mph! 77% more energy required! But we just love a tailwind! Check the weather forecasts!!

So if pushing the range on long trips, you really have to go super-gently at first, see if your range-reserve is rising (nice) or falling at a safe rate that still leaves you miles in hand. If falling too fast, you're in trouble, so need to slow down, slipstream/shelter behing lorry or find a Rapid PDQ!
 

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The e-2008 is the same battery size as the e-208 and the Corsa-e, 50kWh with 47kWh usable. Use your trip computer to see what the average miles/kWh is to work out your true range.

On the smaller e-208/Corsa-e you will struggle to get better than 3.2miles/kWh at 70 mph on a dry road. The larger e-2008 will probably not even achieve that. You probably have a usable range of 150 miles or less, irrespective of what the GoM says.

Doesn't sound like there's anything wrong with the car. If you want more range, drive a bit slower, say 65mph on the motorway and you'll probably get about 10% better range.
 

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I've just been comparing e-2008 with the Ioniq 38 that I have, on the ev-database.uk website. Interesting reading.
e-2008Ioniq 38.3
Useable battery kWh45.038.3
WLTP (best from google)206194
City - mile weather (miles)235225
Highway - cold weather -10C105110
Highway - mile weather 23C140140
Weight Unladen (EU) Kg15481602
Width (w/o mirrors) mm18201770
Height14501530
Width x Height (m**2), my calc2.642.71
Cd Drag coeff (google)0.34 automobile-catalog.com0.24 hyundai claimed

So with 15% larger battery, 5.8% higher WLTP(best), the lighter e-2008 manages only 4% better range in the easiest test with max range achieved. This gives an idea of the efficiency etc of the drivetrain. So you'ld hope, having bought this larger battery, to manage this same 4% advantage in all tests. Not so!

The Highway mild weather, no A/C, looks like a summer day to me, the e-2008 and Ioniq draw level, so this is the brick-like aerodynamics of e-2008 I think.

In the sub-zero very extreme test, the e-2008 is 5% down on the Ioniq. How much of this is due to use of heat-pump to help cabin heating, I don't know. I suspect most of it. Some of this may be different tyres and how they cope with wet/damp roads. So the e-2008 in extreme cold weather loses around 9% of it's advantage. We hoped for +5% better range, but got -5%.

Driving more slowly is the only comfortable option to try to recover from this. Or wrap up in thermals gloves & turn the heating off! Brrrrrrrr...
 
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