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Interesting. I’ve certainly not seen that at other IONITY sites. I wonder if that’s part of the French legislation?

They appear to be 350 kW units as well:

130407
 

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It say 'up to 350kW' but the Chademo I think is only 50kW from the triple head rapid.

There are a couple of Citröen models that use Chademo so maybe it is a French requirement. Renaults can charge up to 22kW so another reason for having the triple head units. As all the triple head rapids I saw were virtually brand new, perhaps Ionity is stepping in to replace the recently closed down faulty Corri-Door units?

If you look at the Ionity web site and click on the Aire de Gueux or Aire de Vrigny on the other side of the autoroute west of Reims it only indicates 4 CCS units. It would be useful if the web site listed AC and Chadmo as well.
 

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800 volt batteries can charge quicker as there is a longer constant current phase before ramping down so maybe they won’t need massive chargers. I wasn’t suggesting the chargers shouldn’t be upgradable, just that 150 kW should be good for the next few years.
I am not convinced, if you take 2 cells and connect them either in series or parallel, so the same total capacity but different voltage, then the maximum charge rate will either be x2 voltage or x2 current, but not a shorter time period.
 

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It say 'up to 350kW' but the Chademo I think is only 50kW from the triple head rapid.

There are a couple of Citröen models that use Chademo so maybe it is a French requirement. Renaults can charge up to 22kW so another reason for having the triple head units. As all the triple head rapids I saw were virtually brand new, perhaps Ionity is stepping in to replace the recently closed down faulty Corri-Door units?

If you look at the Ionity web site and click on the Aire de Gueux or Aire de Vrigny on the other side of the autoroute west of Reims it only indicates 4 CCS units. It would be useful if the web site listed AC and Chadmo as well.
Which is odd as my screenshot is from their app, which does mention the AC and Chademo.

I see from your photo even the CCS is limited to 50 kW on that triple head charger.
 

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I am not convinced, if you take 2 cells and connect them either in series or parallel, so the same total capacity but different voltage, then the maximum charge rate will either be x2 voltage or x2 current, but not a shorter time period.
For a 40 kWh battery the charging current is constant up to 60 - 65% SOC. On a 100kWh battery it’s constant up to 35 - 40% SOC so by increasing the battery voltage and having two in series instead of parallel you can almost double the constant current phase before the current ramps down during the constant voltage phase.
 

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The charging profile of 800 volt Li-ion cells
Li-Ion cells have a voltage of 3.5-4V. Higher voltages are by series connecting a bunch of them.

The reasons for using 800V packs over 400V (approx) is that for a given current in the cabling (to motors, from chargers) is that you double the power transfer.
The acceptable current profile for individual cells is defined by the exact chemistry, construction and manufacturer's assumptions and choices, not the pack voltage.
 

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Li-Ion cells have a voltage of 3.5-4V. Higher voltages are by series connecting a bunch of them.

The reasons for using 800V packs over 400V (approx) is that for a given current in the cabling (to motors, from chargers) is that you double the power transfer.
The acceptable current profile for individual cells is defined by the exact chemistry, construction and manufacturer's assumptions and choices, not the pack voltage.
I was editing when you posted and my original comment was not very clear. The point is that with two packs in series (800 volts) you need less current for the same power so you get a more favourable charging regime. For example, at 110 amps the current is constant up to nearly 65% SOC then drops away almost linearly to 100% SOC. At 250 amps the current is constant only up to 35% SOC before tailing off linearly. So if you try to increase a 44kWh battery by doubling in parallel you get a very inefficient and longer charging regime. If you connect them in series the current stays the same which suits the Li-ion chemistry. Of course it also reduces resistive losses in chargers and car.
 

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On your revised post:
For a 40 kWh battery the charging current is constant up to 60 - 65% SOC. On a 100kWh battery it’s constant up to 35 - 40% SOC
What?
The (safe) charge current/SoC relationship is per cell - it has nothing to do with the total capacity of the pack.
For example, at 110 amps the current is constant up to nearly 65% SOC then drops away almost linearly to 100% SOC.
If that is for (let's say) a 100kWh pack at 800V (= 88kW charge) and it is reconfigured to 400V (ie. split in two and connected in parallel) you can then supply 220A at 400V (still = 88kW). Half of that (110A) will go to each half of the pack.
At the cell level nothing has changed.
 

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On your revised post:
What?
The (safe) charge current/SoC relationship is per cell - it has nothing to do with the total capacity of the pack.
If that is for (let's say) a 100kWh pack at 800V (= 88kW charge) and it is reconfigured to 400V (ie. split in two and connected in parallel) you can then supply 220A at 400V (still = 88kW). Half of that (110A) will go to each half of the pack.
At the cell level nothing has changed.
Yes. The advantage is reduced current in the tether etc. and series/parallel doesn’t make any difference except maybe in cell balancing (?). I was mixing up the fact that increasing the charger power is a diminishing return due to the characteristics of the cell unless you use a different chemistry which will then affect something else.
 

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So if it doesn't include ecotricity, we are looking at up to 6 chargers per MSA. And 4 in those wierd ones where there wasn't any power for charging.
And eventully 14 in bigger ones.
Solar shades please..... Not so much for the summer, more for the rain in the winter.
With 150kw, I could see throughput being limited to how long people want to stop for not charge rate.
I hop the government/managers understand wide distribution is much more important early on and not start at London and work thier way up the m1.
 

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Yes. The advantage is reduced current in the tether etc. and series/parallel doesn’t make any difference except maybe in cell balancing (?). I was mixing up the fact that increasing the charger power is a diminishing return due to the characteristics of the cell unless you use a different chemistry which will then affect something else.
Except in all examples to date, the charger still supplies at 400v and it’s converted to 800v onboard.

Frankly I don’t see the need unless you want improved performance.
 

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Not having driven in France for many years, can you tell me what the Aire bit is? Is it a chain of service stations?
‘Aire’ is normally a rest stop, with maybe some toilets and picnic tables.

They can also have charging facilities and shops, but I think they call them something else when they are a full MSA.

Most of then motorway stops with chargers are at the ones with full service facilities.
 

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Literally a rest area. Some have tables, toilets, somewhere to walk the dog/kids, no retail at all.
Just checked. The one I stop at most to charge in France is ‘Aire du Caylar’. It has a full compliment of restaurant, gift shop and Superchargers.

Maybe someone else can confirm, but are they all ‘Aire’?
 
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