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The electrician says that the RCD used for the Zoe is different. Apparently home charge points for all EVs have the same RCD except those for the Zoe which has its own special spec.
I'm not really sure what RCD is or how it works but I am wondering what the implications might be it terms of using other charge points or plugging other EVS into my special Zoefied home charge point.
 

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Seems an odd statement, the only thing I can think is that the "normal" points he's been installing are 16amp, but the Zoe uses a "special" 32amp version...

The Zoe should work on any type2 socket, it shouldn't need special provisions.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
He said there was a momentary 5A surge with the Zoe charger which tripped out a standard home charge install.
I'll try to upload a photo of the RCD box in case someone understands the markings.
 

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He said there was a momentary 5A surge with the Zoe charger which tripped out a standard home charge install.
I'll try to upload a photo of the RCD box in case someone understands the markings.
....5A surge? On a 16A or 32A charger.....?
 

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OK, so I can't see why 32a rated cables, rcd, rcbo, would be upset by a 5a "surge"? 5a is vacuum cleaner territory.
 

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The electrician says that the RCD used for the Zoe is different. Apparently home charge points for all EVs have the same RCD except those for the Zoe which has its own special spec.
I'm not really sure what RCD is or how it works but I am wondering what the implications might be it terms of using other charge points or plugging other EVS into my special Zoefied home charge point.
Veeery interesting.......
 

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There are multiple types of RCD which vary by, for example, tolerance of DC currents on AC systems.

Most standards require at least a Type A RCD (which excludes Type AC), but some people think that a Type B is to be preferred in 3 phase applications.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Here are photos of today's install showing the consumer unit and the new gadget installed in a new box between the consumer unit and the charging unit. Haven't a clue what this new box is for. None of the other circuits seem to have one.
tmp_5122-20140912_213953219965593.jpg
tmp_5122-20140912_214003-1429460016.jpg
 

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That'll be identical to the one fitted for my 32amp type 1 "leaf" charger then:rolleyes:

image.jpg
 

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32 Amp MCB in slot 5 for over current protection. It's a Type C (the others are Type B) which allows more initial inrush current without tripping.

RCCB is another term for an RCD which trips if the current in the live and neutral differ significantly - indicative of a fault to earth.
 

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I have a 40A Doepke RCD and a 40A Schneider MCB (C curve) feeding my Zoe charger.

The BG fitter said that they normally fit B curve MCBs, but they had specific instructions to fit C curve for Zoe chargers.
 

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I have a 40A Doepke RCD and a 40A Schneider MCB (C curve) feeding my Zoe charger.

The BG fitter said that they normally fit B curve MCBs, but they had specific instructions to fit C curve for Zoe chargers.
So why did BG fit a C curve for my Leaf...?
 

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So why did BG fit a C curve for my Leaf...?
According to the PodPoint Installation Guide, Renault's EV Ready standard requires D curve, and everything else can be B or C.

Most domestic MCBs are Type B. Type C are used in commercial or industrial applications. Type D are uncommon.
 

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According to the PodPoint Installation Guide, Renault's EV Ready standard requires D curve, and everything else can be B or C.

Most domestic MCBs are Type B. Type C are used in commercial or industrial applications. Type D are uncommon.
So basically, none of these installers know what they're doing?:rolleyes:
 

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Sorry for resurrecting an old thread. But only just joined the RV party with a Leaf.

Hopefully provide some clarity, if you look at the IEE Regulations they provide a table of time/current that detail the characteristics of all electrical fuses and mcbs.
They are designed to cope with an inrush of current from an inductive load.
These are an idea of the different loads required to instantly trip a 40 amp mcb.
Type B 200 amp, type C 400 amp, type D 800 amp.
It is really surprising how much current they will take before tripping.
 

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I thought there was a timing element to it as well, i.e. a "C" will trip before a "D"? I have this vague recollection of an electrician friend saying a "D" in domestic situations would be likely to lead to the main fuse blowing before the RCD tripped.
 

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The Zoe is well known to draw a large initial surge of current as it starts charging. I can easily believe that it might sometimes trip a 32A Type B MCB.

Some installers fit Type C, some fit 40A MCBs for 32A charge points (assuming the cable is big enough to take it) and perhaps some do both.

Fitting a Type D seems a bit extreme though - they're very unusual indeed.
 

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I will check on 32 amps tomorrow night when i am work as my copy of the regs are there.
They are on curves that decrease time to trip with an increase in current. Different mcb types have a different profile curve. From memory a 32 amp B type will never trip at 40 amp.
 

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I did my own wiring and board, just got the supplier installer to screw to wall and connect. I put a 32 amp B type on a 6mm. Not tripped on the leaf but i am only on a 3.3kw which is about 14 amp.
 
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