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Discussion Starter #1
Having sold my car and posted off the battery hire transfer agreement signed by the new owner. I heard nothing from RCI for a week, but noticed that they have taken a battery lease payment from my account a week after I sold the car. I chased them and they said that the mail doesn't goes to a different part of Renault head office and their internal mail system is very slow in forwarding it on to them. They therefore asked if I had a picture of the form that I could email them which fortunately I had kept. Email sent and 2 days later I get a email from them to say I am still liable for the battery lease until they get a signed battery lease agreement back from the new owner. Presumably anything the new owner sends back will also get stuck in their internal mail system and this could take some time for them to process. Meanwhile they expect me to continue to pay for the hire of a battery - absolutely bonkers!

Looking through their paperwork on selling a car privately they say you shouldn't hand over the vehicle to your buyer until the battery transfer has been processed. How would anyone ever manage to sell a car. Can you imagine someone coming to buy your car, agreeing to buy it and then not getting it for a month. I'm sure the purchaser would just walk away. Needless to say I let the purchaser take the car as they had paid me and they had filled in the forms that RCI had given me which included their bank details. Surely the whole point of RCI being able to disable the battery is so they can police it's use and it's an un-reasonable term to expect me to be liable for the lease until they have processed the new hire agreement. I, in common with most people don't have a way of undertaking a credit check on the new owner of the car, nor should I be able to do so on behalf of RCI.

The whole experience has soured the experience of owning a Renault (or Nissan as RCI would be involved). As a result I think I would be unlikely to purchase another car from them.
 

Zoe Devotee
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Snap!

4 months I was made to pay battery hire even though the car was gone. RCI had Zero interest, even though they said they would suspend payment because the dealer who bought my car was furloughed (they had completed paperwork I'd given them, but then RCI sent out a second phase of paperwork if a non Renault dealer). But as you know RCI are rotten to the core, so they carried on regardless.

Don't worry though give it 5 mins and someone who traded their car into a Renault dealer for another Renault will be along to tell you your wrong. 馃挬

Remember the #tag #ISurvivedRCI
 

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When I did it I had the new owner sign the new agreement and emailed it myself.

Therefore no issues.

It's like the V5, you get the new owner to sign and post it yourself. Never leave it to someone else.
 

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This is probably bad advice, IANAL and all that....

I'd be inclined to cancel the direct debit and use the direct debit mandate to recall the payment they took after the car was sold.

It would then be up to them to prove that you are liable for that fee, and regardless of the lettering of the contract if it went to court the idea of being required to pay a battery lease on a car that isn't yours would surely have to fail the reasonableness test. You have submitted the paperwork to terminate your contract with RCI - whether or not the new owner forms a new contract with RCI for the battery lease doesn't strike me as your problem.

But IANAL so please don't follow this thought to your detriment. Talk to a professional!
 

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I didn't have any issue selling mine privately. Bit of a faff but it went smoothly. I didn't let them have the car until I had confirmation from RCI. I'd explained that to the buyer beforehand and they were proactive enough to contact RCI themselves to get the lease application moving before the auction finished. And I automatically got a refund on the last lease payment I made as the new owner took over.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone for the advice, I've done about 9300 miles over the battery lease millage over the almost 6 years that I've had the car, so it's probably worth not rocking the boat too much at the moment in case they then decide to enforce the excess payment which would amount to 拢371. I'll be chasing them regularly though.

The battery lease system seems to be very poorly thought out and very one sided to the detriment of their customers. In 2014 when I purchased the car owning the battery wasn't an option. RCI's paperwork still says very clearly that you can never own the leased battery despite many reports that they are allowing buy-outs now.
 

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I had to pay three months payments due to RCI and the buyer being slow and ignoring things. I learnt some lessons from that.

I had to chase RCI and the buyer several times even resorting to emailing the buyer the documents as RCI copied me in on some things. At the time I was expecting an over mileage bill anyway so didn't push it much but now knowing that they don't care it cost me almost 拢150 more in payments than it should have done.

When I bought my second Zoe I didn't want the seller to go through any of that crap and found that you can indeed sign the paperwork and email it over to them straight away. You can then call them to make sure they have received it, as long as it is normal office hours.

However that isn't the end of the story for the lease. That first transfer request is just that a request, RCI need to process that and send out a new agreement that the buyer needs to sign that and send it back, then it has to be processed. Only once that is all done the seller is off the hook.

The main lesson is whether selling or buying, take clear pictures or scan the documents in and email them over when you are together. Then call them to make sure they have got through. It does speed things up somewhat.
 

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The battery lease system seems to be very poorly thought out and very one sided to the detriment of their customers.
Sorry, whilst sympathetic to your predicament I think it is well thought through although the consequences were never explained by the salespeople who's only concern is the immediate sale.
The issue is that RCI need a credit agreement with the new lessee. Whether someone who can scrape together the relatively small amount of cash required to purchase a used Zo毛 is also credit worthy in the long term is not known to RCI and I suspect not to the average seller of the used car. The lease was a great idea to sell an expensive car with the unknown battery technology and hence risk, but stored up this issue for the future.
As a seller of the car you may luck out and find a credit worthy purchaser, but RCI will not let you off the hook until they are convinced. The issue comes if you sell the car and part with it to someone who isn't creditworthy to RCIs requirements. If you haven't agreed a contract with enforceable provisions for this circumstances you could come unstuck.
The other poorly explained situation is what happens in the event of the car being written off or stolen and not recovered. If you haven't also insured the battery (which is difficult as you don't own it) you can also come unstuck.
I also suspect that the end of life requirements are not fully explained. With most cars when they reach their end of life they still have a positive scrap value. With a rented battery you are still liable to return the battery to RCI in France or pay Renault UK to do this on your behalf at a cost reputed to be in four figures. So you could have a car with negative value that has ceased to be useful but that you are still liable for battery rental and disposal on.
 

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The battery lease system seems to be very poorly thought out and very one sided to the detriment of their customers.
Sorry, whilst sympathetic to your predicament I think it is well thought through although the consequences were never explained by the salespeople who's only concern is the immediate sale.
The issue is that RCI need a credit agreement with the new lessee. Whether someone who can scrape together the relatively small amount of cash required to purchase a used Zo毛 is also credit worthy in the long term is not known to RCI and I suspect not to the average seller of the used car. The lease was a great idea to sell an expensive car with the unknown battery technology and hence risk, but stored up this issue for the future.
As a seller of the car you may luck out and find a credit worthy purchaser, but RCI will not let you off the hook until they are convinced. The issue comes if you sell the car and part with it to someone who isn't creditworthy to RCIs requirements. If you haven't agreed a contract with enforceable provisions for this circumstances you could come unstuck.
The other poorly explained situation is what happens in the event of the car being written off or stolen and not recovered. If you haven't also insured the battery (which is difficult as you don't own it) you can also come unstuck.
I also suspect that the end of life requirements are not fully explained. With most cars when they reach their end of life they still have a positive scrap value. With a rented battery you are still liable to return the battery to RCI in France or pay Renault UK to do this on your behalf at a cost reputed to be in four figures. So you could have a car with negative value that has ceased to be useful but that you are still liable for battery rental and disposal on.
 

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I was told the lease credit check is only for identification purposes really. 'it's a pretty soft search'... they said.

The completed agreement on my credit file comes under the utility section.

But yes, they have to pass it still.
 

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The other poorly explained situation is what happens in the event of the car being written off or stolen and not recovered. If you haven't also insured the battery (which is difficult as you don't own it) you can also come unstuck.
That just isn't true. Almost all insurers are happy to cover a leased battery, you just need to let them know and include value, so a 拢7K Zoe needs to be insured for 拢12K. Below is one example of a mainstream insurer.
 

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If RCI still get paid they have no motivation to get the changeover done in a reasonable time.

Has anyone challenged them legally on whether you can even make someone pay lease payments on a battery they don't own that's now in a car that that person doesn't own either?
 

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If RCI still get paid they have no motivation to get the changeover done in a reasonable time.

Has anyone challenged them legally on whether you can even make someone pay lease payments on a battery they don't own that's now in a car that that person doesn't own either?
The lease is for the battery which is always owned by RCI, it doesn't really matter who owns the car.

If you move out of a rented flat and your mate moves in, you are still liable for the rent until your mate signs a tenancy agreement with the landlord and the landlord agrees. Same concept.
 
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And unlike "your Mate", you know nothing about the purchaser of your used car and are letting them take RCIs asset away. How would you expect the mortgage company to react?
 

Zoe Devotee
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Almost all insurers are happy to cover a leased battery,
Almost!

So if the guy that bought your car didn't pass the credit check or perhaps didn't submit the direct debit paperwork then their insurance doesn't cover the battery, its still your liability.

The lease is for the battery which is always owned by RCI, it doesn't really matter who owns the car.
And the lessee is still liable until RCI deem them not to be, see the point above.
 

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That just isn't true. Almost all insurers are happy to cover a leased battery, you just need to let them know and include value, so a 拢7K Zoe needs to be insured for 拢12K. Below is one example of a mainstream insurer.
It's a very interesting field agreeing a value for something that there isn't an open market in.
What happens if I'm leasing the battery?
To reduce the cost of buying an electric car, some manufacturers (such as Renault and Nissan) offer the chance to buy the car and lease its battery separately.
The monthly lease amount is typically less than two full tanks of fuel 鈥 saving you no money on running costs but doing a fair bit for the environment.
You should notify us when taking out your policy if you're leasing the battery. If the car is written off, we need to make sure the payouts for the car and its battery go to their respective owners. If you own the battery, its value is combined with that of your car 鈥 this then makes up your car's market value.
But you are correct in principle - just so long as the owner remembers to declare it to their insurer and the value assessed by the insurance company matches that assigned by the owner (RCI). Any Gap insurance needs to take account of this as well - RCI for example appear to write down the value of their battery on a straight line basis meaning that the owner of the remains of the car suffers at a much higher rate initially.
 

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The battery rental agreement has the insurance valuation so was easy to work out what I needed to declare to my insurance company, although many now don't ask it just needs to be below their ceiling.

As prices were due to rise, I actually got GAP in my ZE40 - first time ever, but obviously not from Renault! The company I used seem to understand battery rental too, which was good. My current policy gives replacement in 1st year so didn't bother with ZE50.
 
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Almost!

So if the guy that bought your car didn't pass the credit check or perhaps didn't submit the direct debit paperwork then their insurance doesn't cover the battery, its still your liability.
Interesting, but you can still claim against someone for damaging property you are responsible for. For example, if I rented a house and the removal company damaged the property moving me in, I can still hold them liable, despite not owning it.

Obviously suing someone is not a situation you would want to get into, so I wouldn't let a Zoe go to a new owner until the battery lease had been transferred and suggest others don't.
 
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