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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm surprised there are not more posts on this subject. I'm not thrilled with the recup options provided on the Kona:
1. I'm good with the four fixed levels for long descents and city driving. More levels would not be amiss though.

2. Left-paddle recup and hold:
a) when you are turning you have to chase the paddle around the wheel.
b) it's a bit too strong for the comfort of passengers on every stop, but oddly can be reduced with a simultaneous push of the go-pedal, not mentioned in the manual.
c) it's hard to predict the exact stopping point and if you add foot braking to help, it cancels the strong paddle recup and you have to push the brake even harder.
d) if I modulate the paddle to push out the stopping point I end up inadvertently shifting to a higher fixed recup level as well.

3. Brake pedal recuperation is too weak and there is no feedback when friction braking commences.

4. Auto recup is too unpredictable for my tastes. I like coasting to be consistent so that my driving in traffic can be handled subconsciously.

5. Why no option for single pedal driving (down to hold) for those who want that?

My preferences overall are that the EV emulate fossil car characteristics so that my reactions skills don't have to change should I be unlucky enough to ever have to drive one again.

What recup features are others using on the Kona?
 

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Have you driven an EV before? This is generally how they are, and you have to adjust your driving style to get the best from the regenerative braking.

The idea is that the brake pedal is "transparent", you aren't supposed to know where the friction brake kicks in. The idea is that the car reduces speed proportional to the amount you press the pedal, that's all.

My advice is to try driving with regen turned up. I always drive my Leaf in B mode, the highest level of regen. Then use the accelerator pedal to control you speed. Get used to the amount of regen available and you will soon learn to stop in the right place.

For one pedal mode you hold the paddle when you get down to below 10 KPH, and also try enabling auto-hold so you can let go of it once stopped.

Being exactly like an ICE would waste energy and prevent you getting the best from the system. If you want that then just ignore regen.
 

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That's a good question. On the Leaf they don't, on some other cars they only come on when regen is greater than some preset limit. Similar to an ICE where coasting doesn't put the brake lights on, even though some vehicles lose speed much faster than others.
 

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I always have my regen in the highest level. Next time I go out at night I will try other regen levels.
Thanks.
As an example, in our Golf has brake lights on regen level 4, on level 3 brake lights come on and stay on if the brake pedal is used. They stay on until the accelerator is touched.
Levels 1&2 have no brake lights unless using the brake pedal, and they go off when the brake pedal is released.
 

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I has a BMW i3 for 4 years before this and although the Hyundai set up is different I do not have a problem with it now I have had more time with the Kona. I use Auto Regen all of the time with all driving modes set to min as standard. I then use the left and right pedals if necessary to modify the car’s response. Overall, I fond the Kona to be better than the i3 in this respect (in truth in every respect!). I certainly don’t want the car to drive like an ICE, its bad enough that make it make a noise!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
Driving "like an ICE" does not mean wasting energy and making noise - why would anyone think I mean that? It is entirely possible to design the vehicle controls to act in a conventional way yet provide the best in energy efficiency. Just as it's possible to design a one-pedal system that can hold a stop without having to use a paddle.
I prefer to think of this as a “car”, not an EV or ICE, and see no reason to have to adapt my driving skills to one particular design or another. So far we have no standardisation of regen features between EV models due to continuing development but I’ll bet they will eventually be vastly simplified.
 

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It is entirely possible to design the vehicle controls to act in a conventional way yet provide the best in energy efficiency.
That's the point here - it's not possible. You will have to adjust your driving style a little if you want maximum efficiency.

That is true even of ICE cars. The most efficiency driving profile depends on the gearbox and the engine and the tuning.
 

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I'm surprised there are not more posts on this subject. I'm not thrilled with the recup options provided on the Kona:
1. I'm good with the four fixed levels for long descents and city driving. More levels would not be amiss though.

2. Left-paddle recup and hold:
a) when you are turning you have to chase the paddle around the wheel.
b) it's a bit too strong for the comfort of passengers on every stop, but oddly can be reduced with a simultaneous push of the go-pedal, not mentioned in the manual.
c) it's hard to predict the exact stopping point and if you add foot braking to help, it cancels the strong paddle recup and you have to push the brake even harder.
d) if I modulate the paddle to push out the stopping point I end up inadvertently shifting to a higher fixed recup level as well.

3. Brake pedal recuperation is too weak and there is no feedback when friction braking commences.

4. Auto recup is too unpredictable for my tastes. I like coasting to be consistent so that my driving in traffic can be handled subconsciously.

5. Why no option for single pedal driving (down to hold) for those who want that?

My preferences overall are that the EV emulate fossil car characteristics so that my reactions skills don't have to change should I be unlucky enough to ever have to drive one again.

What recup features are others using on the Kona?
FYI I have my car set to max regen, not on auto & leave it there, (& the Tesla on max also), i think because i want consistency (hence auto off) & it gives the closest to one-pedal driving that you can get in the Kona, with final braking done with either the left paddle hold or my foot depending on the braking requirements.

1 This is all a bit personal preference i think, There's no pleasing some people! (That's just what Jesus said, sir.)
I don't want more levels of regen - it's almost as if you're trying to replace gears :confused:

2 a, You may have to chase the paddle when turning, but usually when I'm coming to a full stop I'm not turning (or not much e.g. at a roundabout or junction)
b, personal preference? I mainly modulate the slowing with the amount i release the accelerator (as I'm in max regen)
c, it's quite simple to predict the stopping point (I have auto off, this gives me consistency), the more you use it, the more you get used to how it works
d, I've not had this, but it links in with c,

3 You should have no idea when the brake pedal is regenerating, is meant to be & is seamless, so you can confidently know that you can just use the brake pedal & the car maxes out the regen potential & may top off with the brakes - as per your foot input; unless emergency stopping & this just uses the brakes.

4 Don't use auto regen then, I've heard others like it, i don't mind it, but I choose not to use it, i prefer consistency - I feel Hyundai have given plenty of choice/variety, (Tesla has high or low)

5 Not everyone wants one pedal driving, I like two pedals, it allows me to be more consistent
If we had true one pedal driving, i should be able to "leap" off the accelerator & the car should come to an emergency stop - I could see this being a nightmare for most people & not what I would want either,
But as i said at the start, the closest to one-pedal driving that you can get in the Kona: set to max regen, not on auto

Your (individual) preferences don't count for much I'm afraid :( perhaps if more of us felt like you, 'we' could have a greater influence, but I don't particularly see "emulate fossil car characteristics" as useful, since all the cars I've ever driven are all different & i have to modulate my reactions skills for each of them, where's the difference?
Although, I barely notice the difference in how i drive the change isn't that dramatic, i much prefer driving an electric car though, so simple & smooth

Driving "like an ICE" does not mean wasting energy and making noise - why would anyone think I mean that? It is entirely possible to design the vehicle controls to act in a conventional way yet provide the best in energy efficiency. Just as it's possible to design a one-pedal system that can hold a stop without having to use a paddle.
I prefer to think of this as a “car”, not an EV or ICE, and see no reason to have to adapt my driving skills to one particular design or another. So far we have no standardisation of regen features between EV models due to continuing development but I’ll bet they will eventually be vastly simplified.
I didn't really get this, who said driving like an ICE...
Electric cars drive quite conventionally,
I'm surprised @donald hasn't been along to say how to drive with "the best in energy efficiency", this should be without ever using brakes or regen, highly impractical on the public highways or most inconvenient/inconsiderate to other road users.
I don't quite get "hold a stop without having to use a paddle"? but perhaps it relates to what @tanelv says?
I think of mine as just a car & drive as such, Hyundai have given much choice in how it drives: 4 levels of regen plus an auto mode, 3 driving models & effectively two stopping pedals (left hold paddle & the foot brake) - you don't get all this choice in most ICE cars
I'm glad there's no standardisation across EV models, variety is the the spice of life (y)
Though the direction of things may converge
Anyway Half a denary for me bloody life story? There's no pleasing some people :LOL:
 

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You’re lucky you don’t have my Leaf 30. In B mode there is sometimes strong engine braking, sometimes weak and often none at all. It changes within the same phase of driving and is unconnected with state of battery charge or outside temperature. The dealer has never been able to find a fault. I’m really looking forward to more reliable and adjustable regen from my Kona.
 

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I must admit, it wasn't until i watched a video earlier this week, that i realised people were using the regen/settings like "gears", the guy in the video was complaining ( :ROFLMAO: ) that in his Leaf, he had to keep moving his hand away from the steering wheel & down to the mode selector approaching/leaving roundabouts/junctions etc to modulate the regen (???)
This seemed very novel to me, but i realise that some people (want to be especially economical & others,) do quite long journeys versus their battery/range so try to maximise & regain energy used, (Again not an issue for me with the Kona & it's large battery.) Whereas in the Kona he could just flick the paddles (y)
I can't be bothered with this faff though. :rolleyes:
I guess i can kind of get it, depending on the road types, so motorways may barely need any regen as the speed can be consistent, but for me I tend to use the intelligent cruise control everywhere I can :cool: so use of regen or brakes becomes almost moot :love:
 

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I'm surprised @donald hasn't been along to say how to drive with "the best in energy efficiency", this should be without ever using brakes or regen, highly impractical on the public highways or most inconvenient/inconsiderate to other road users.
I wasn't following the thread, but I'd say the best energy efficiency is without using brakes or regen so long as it suits the situation, if not then as close to that.

People drive like morons anyway, they love to overtake you and race up to stop at the lights, then you get there and they turn green and you roll on. I usually provide drivers behind with improved convenience and consideration by smoothing out their driving and showing them a suitably efficient and usually quickest way to drive, but they still get annoyed at it because they are morons and seemingly have little idea of speed, momentum, efficiency, energy, etc.. They've been watching too many 'fast and furious' films, or something.
 

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I wasn't following the thread, but I'd say the best energy efficiency is without using brakes or regen so long as it suits the situation, if not then as close to that.
:) (Doffs hat) Cheers @donald, I know you can’t look at everything, it was more of a nod to your reputation (?) for efficient driving
 
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