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Discussion Starter #1
So from what I read here the Niro does not have the same capability as the Kona and Ioniq to operate at reduced charge (ie below 1.4kW)? According to my search of this platform and looking at You Tube (EV Puzzle) apparently the Kona can charge at a lower setting from solar without drawing power from the grid. The settings are apparently specific to the car and not the charging unit. I asked Kia this question 3 weeks ago in relation to the Niro and still await an answer.
Can anyone share their experience of this please?
thank you.
 

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You are able (in theory) to use any EV charger that allows the user to set a charge current to do this. As I understand, it the IEC standard has a PWM signal to let the car know how much current is available.
 

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That's true, but.... it still requires the charger in the car to support that. If the EVSE signals the available power is below a lower limit for the car it might simply not charge, it just can't draw more.

The Niro 4 I have came with a granny charger that allows selecting 6A, which is about 1.4KW. It's entirely possible it can't go below that. I can see the benefit of wringing everything you can out of the solar, but unless you're not driving anywhere at all, even a 6A charge rate is incredibly slow. Charging from 20-80% at that rate, only during daylight would take about six days. If you dropped to 3A.... You basically have to not be using the car at all for extended periods for there to be any point. I suppose if the country were in some sort of lock down....... :unsure:
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Thanks both for getting back to me and it seems options exist. Yes it was lockdown that prompted the question along with a relatively small number of solar panels that frequently in summer at least return to the grid energy a bit below 1kW
 

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Discussion Starter #6
6A is minimum the standard allows. Where did You see info that some cars can go below?
I heard about it on a You Tube video (EV Puzzle). The info relates specifically to Kona and Ioniq EV’s and the option is within the charging controls of the vehicle itself when hooked up to a Zappi. I will see if I can find the link
 

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I heard about it on a You Tube video (EV Puzzle). The info relates specifically to Kona and Ioniq EV’s and the option is within the charging controls of the vehicle itself when hooked up to a Zappi. I will see if I can find the link
Here is the link Tom

 

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My Ioniq has an option L M and H on the charger and
L is about 1100W or 5A
M is about 1350W or 6A
H is about 1600W or 7A

That is what I measured at the socket. However, the manual and what it says on the charger is different to that suggesting either 8A or 10A. And I think others have seen differences. I am not sure if that is something about here in Chile, or the car, or the socket I have.

It works quite well as my spare solar on a sunny day is usually around that amount (1100-1600W) during peak hours.

The L option is useful for the early to mid morning and late afternoon or when I want to plug in various things at once.

The H option is the best though in general.

I have managed about 90% solar in lockdown and I expect that to still be perhaps 80% after vaccine.

The key is that I work from home so I am at home most Mondays - Friday 9-5.

When I come back from a long drive I actually charge it up again over about the next three days.

It would be nice if the car could be designed to draw whatever energy was spare. This ought to be possible. The car would need to know the current load of the house which ought to be possible somehow with an app or some wireless or internet based tech. Hopefully the cars of the future will be able to do that. I don´t know if any already can.
 

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My Ioniq has an option L M and H on the charger and
L is about 1100W or 5A
M is about 1350W or 6A
H is about 1600W or 7A

That is what I measured at the socket. However, the manual and what it says on the charger is different to that suggesting either 8A or 10A. And I think others have seen differences. I am not sure if that is something about here in Chile, or the car, or the socket I have.

It works quite well as my spare solar on a sunny day is usually around that amount (1100-1600W) during peak hours.

The L option is useful for the early to mid morning and late afternoon or when I want to plug in various things at once.

The H option is the best though in general.

I have managed about 90% solar in lockdown and I expect that to still be perhaps 80% after vaccine.

The key is that I work from home so I am at home most Mondays - Friday 9-5.

When I come back from a long drive I actually charge it up again over about the next three days.

It would be nice if the car could be designed to draw whatever energy was spare. This ought to be possible. The car would need to know the current load of the house which ought to be possible somehow with an app or some wireless or internet based tech. Hopefully the cars of the future will be able to do that. I don´t know if any already can.
OpenEVSE can do this solar integration-

Specifically for the Ioniq28 (and quite possibly for any Hyundai-Kia EVs, though I don't know):
You can combine L,M or H settings on the car with L, M or H on the EVSE ("granny") itself .
I'm pretty sure I got under 1kW when I tested on my Ioniq, I can confirm at the weekend.
 

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My Ioniq has an option L M and H on the charger and
L is about 1100W or 5A
M is about 1350W or 6A
H is about 1600W or 7A

That is what I measured at the socket. However, the manual and what it says on the charger is different to that suggesting either 8A or 10A. And I think others have seen differences. I am not sure if that is something about here in Chile, or the car, or the socket I have.

It works quite well as my spare solar on a sunny day is usually around that amount (1100-1600W) during peak hours.

The L option is useful for the early to mid morning and late afternoon or when I want to plug in various things at once.

The H option is the best though in general.

I have managed about 90% solar in lockdown and I expect that to still be perhaps 80% after vaccine.

The key is that I work from home so I am at home most Mondays - Friday 9-5.

When I come back from a long drive I actually charge it up again over about the next three days.

It would be nice if the car could be designed to draw whatever energy was spare. This ought to be possible. The car would need to know the current load of the house which ought to be possible somehow with an app or some wireless or internet based tech. Hopefully the cars of the future will be able to do that. I don´t know if any already can.
That can be done with a zappie
The car I don't think will ever be that integrated to the house and solar PV panels.
 
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