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Discussion Starter #1
Had the e-Niro 4 for a few weeks (amazing car!). Interested to know if anyone has a sense of which regen level is best for maximising efficiency and range?

I assumed setting it to the highest level (3) would return the most miles as you capture more when slowing down but reading the experience of others I’m not too sure.

Personally I’ve found level 3 the most fun to drive as it’s essentially one pedal driving and you can fully stop the car holding the left paddle. However if there’s a more optimum regen setting I think I’ll change to it! Interested to hear other people’s experiences.
 

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KIA Soul EV 64kWh
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Had the e-Niro 4 for a few weeks (amazing car!). Interested to know if anyone has a sense of which regen level is best for maximising efficiency and range?

I assumed setting it to the highest level (3) would return the most miles as you capture more when slowing down but reading the experience of others I’m not too sure.

Personally I’ve found level 3 the most fun to drive as it’s essentially one pedal driving and you can fully stop the car holding the left paddle. However if there’s a more optimum regen setting I think I’ll change to it! Interested to hear other people’s experiences.
I tried the various settings, but have now settled on <Auto> as the best choice. You can still use the left hand paddle - pull & hold - to nearly stop the car. The KIA is so efficient and the battery so big that I've stopped trying to eke out an extra mile or three!
 

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It should only affect the amount of predetermined regenerative braking, so you will get exactly the same effect with max regeneration or just using the foot brake. If you have a local hill, maintain constant speed by a) ACC, b) regeneration setting c) foot brake, just 3 different control inputs to achieve the same braking force.
 

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If you're good at anticipating traffic flow then auto and then set to zero is the best in my opinion. Anything else in incurs loss. Same principle as petrol car. You wouldn't needlessly slow down and speed up as that uses more fuel to overcome the car's inertia to get back up to speed.
Setting to zero allows the car to coast as far as possible and combining this with auto regen allows the car to slow down and recoup energy if you're not paying attention.
 

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Kia Soul EV 2020
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If you're good at anticipating traffic flow then auto and then set to zero is the best in my opinion. Anything else in incurs loss. Same principle as petrol car. You wouldn't needlessly slow down and speed up as that uses more fuel to overcome the car's inertia to get back up to speed.
Setting to zero allows the car to coast as far as possible and combining this with auto regen allows the car to slow down and recoup energy if you're not paying attention.
This ^^^^ I'm lazy, what can I say :eek:
 
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Kia e-Niro MY20 64 kWh - Gravity Blue
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Did a trip on twisty curvy mountain roads where level 3 is amazing. It allows you to regulate speed when approaching curves or going downhill with precision using just one pedal. Very relaxing.
 

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Did a trip on twisty curvy mountain roads where level 3 is amazing. It allows you to regulate speed when approaching curves or going downhill with precision using just one pedal. Very relaxing.
As I always say, please don't confuse user interface with efficiency! "One pedal driving" or Level 3 Regen is simply an improved user interface. It is nice and relaxing in some conditions and has an appeal as such.

But the OP was looking for
efficiency and range
, so stick to level 0 especially on high speed roads such as motorways. In town or slower roads with loads of stop/start traffic, I don't think it matters so much, use whatever and you will not notice a huge difference. Again available is the "Auto Regen" setting which benefits from both.
 
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As with any vehicle, maintaining momentum is key to efficient driving. Look ahead, leave big gaps, drive slower, avoid braking wherever possible. In reality that doesn’t fit with a lot of driving scenarios. The regen level is a UI setting as has been said. Whether you control regen braking through modulating the accelerator pedal or gentle use of the brake is pretty much immaterial to your efficiency. It’s all about keeping the car moving where you can.
 

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On this topic, is there any way to make the car start in regen level 0 by default? The options for Eco/Normal/Sport seem to only allow the user to choose level 1, 2, or 3 as the default setting.
 

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On this topic, is there any way to make the car start in regen level 0 by default? The options for Eco/Normal/Sport seem to only allow the user to choose level 1, 2, or 3 as the default setting.
If you find one please share!
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Thanks for all the feedback. I had a play around on a long journey today and found that I ended up using more energy accelerating after slowing down too much after misjudging the level 3 regen. Level 0 is easier to coast and save on the battery.
 

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2020 Kona EV, Red, 64kWh Premium SE (10.5kW OBC)
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Once you get skilled at it, finding the 0kW (coast) point on the speed pedal becomes second nature. I now drive all the time in level 3, although I do wish I could have regen level 4 (=holding the left paddle) all the time as I dislike the faint jolt that always accompanies changing regen level.
 

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Yes, it takes a bit more skill to modulate the gas pedal, but NewEVdriver, you are not saving the battery, quite the opposite, you are minimizing your regeneration benefits.

I agree T67M, I have tried the other levels, and even for around town driving, I am on level 3, and use the paddle to stop (which is another skill set) and it's actually more relaxing not swiveling my foot between the gas pedal and the brake.

But I guess it "different strokes for different folks"... or is it "horses for courses"?

Greg
 

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If you were in a petrol car you wouldn't speed and slow down unnecessarily as that wastes petrol. You lose speed and then have to burn petrol to regain your speed. Why should an EV be any different? Sure when you brake you harness some energy which goes back into the battery but that's massively inefficient. What is far more efficient is to coast as much as possible by anticipating the traffic movements ahead of you so that you lose as little forward momentum as possible. Obviously in traffic around town thats not always possible but still as a general rule I try to avoid slowing down unless I absolutely have to. Having regen at anything other than 0 means the car will slow down regardless of what's happening in front of you. The second you take your foot off the accelerator it actively starts to slow down while with zero regen the only thing slowing you down is friction. In traffic having auto and regen set to zero gives you the best of both worlds. When the car detects another in front it slows down but while there is not car in front it coasts.

Will take a lot to convince me otherwise. I've experimented with all the combinations. Agree it's different strokes for different courses :)
 

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Absolutely, the trick is to modulate the accelerator to provide the energy input, coasting or regen that’s appropriate. But it’s a driving style that doesn’t suit everyone. Ultimately between heavy regen and modulated accelerator and 0 regen but using the brake pedal, there are different ways to achieve the same result.
 

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"If you were in a petrol car you wouldn't speed and slow down unnecessarily as that wastes petrol. You lose speed and then have to burn petrol to regain your speed. Why should an EV be any different? "

I'm happy to explain:

1. in a petrol car, when you accelerate you consume fuel, but when you slow down all you do is create heat that goes into the atmosphere. Likewise coasting is not as wasteful, but there is no benefit to it.

2. in an electric car with strong regeneration (and that is exactly the subject here), when you accelerate you discharge the battery, but when you decelerate you RECHARGE the battery. There is a benefit.

And it is NOT massively inefficient as you stated.

EV's are different...

Hopefully that explains the difference very well... if we are good here, then we can proceed to your next statements... if not, no reason to continue to try to help.

I'd be happy to address your other statements that I believe are incorrect.

Greg

p.s. I think the issue is that not everyone can feather the throttle more precisely to be able to maintain a constant velocity as opposed to coasting. I appreciate that... but to make claims that don't follow the laws of physics, or to categorically state the regeneration system is "massively inefficient".... well that is just plain wrong.
 

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Yes, it takes a bit more skill to modulate the gas pedal, but NewEVdriver, you are not saving the battery, quite the opposite, you are minimizing your regeneration benefits.

I agree T67M, I have tried the other levels, and even for around town driving, I am on level 3, and use the paddle to stop (which is another skill set) and it's actually more relaxing not swiveling my foot between the gas pedal and the brake.

But I guess it "different strokes for different folks"... or is it "horses for courses"?

Greg
How is he minimising the regen benefits? Unless he:s braking so hard that the friction brakes are being used, he's not.

I agree that one-pedal driving is easier in general and I use the left paddle shift to brake for corners etc. when possible. I guess there is a knack to being able to "coast" with regen level 3 and I couldn't figure it out myself, meaning I was always in an "accelerate or slow" situation that I found annoying.
 

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In practice over a 600 km total round trip I've found regen claws back between 13 and 18% of the outgoing energy, the latter number when using the more mountainous return route. The BMS values I used to work that out are the same the car (Kona) uses to establish the SoC so I think they are very accurate.

I carried out a test long ago in an attempt to evaluate regen efficiency: Driving slowly up and down a steep hill and logging the power exiting the battery.
I evaluated the data two ways, integrating the power over the distance to get energy, and second, simply taking the average power each way. The results were that 79 to 85% of the uphill energy was recovered going down. It's worth noting that battery cycle efficiency is left out of those numbers.
The idea for going slow was to minimise the component of aerodynamic losses. However I would consider those results to have a potential error of as much as 10% as it wasn't a very long hill.

As another rough estimate, I know the battery cycle efficiency is 96%. I can estimate motor efficiency as around 95% from other similar motors and electrical power conversion perhaps 92%, those being one way only. There are also drivetrain frictional losses to add in, say 2%. So, that sum of those losses is 34%.
 
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