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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Newbie and prospective EV driver...
I live in rented accommodation and the terms stipulate that any permanent installation is left for the benefit of the landlord. Is it possible to have installed a IP 67 type CEEFORM female feed and have the chargepoint with a flying lead to plug into this? This may sound extreme but with no guarantee of length of stay at said property it could turn out to be an expensive moving cost each time.

The consumer unit has a spare way. The run is less than five meters (Straight out of the wall by the CU)
Any thoughts or advice gratefully received.

Sorry if already asked.
 

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Ioniq 5
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When I moved I just took my charger with me and installed it at the new place.

You just need an electrician to connect it to the CU then and notify the work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
When I moved I just took my charger with me and installed it at the new place.

You just need an electrician to connect it to the CU then and notify the work.
Thanks for the reply, but under the rental term I’m obliged to leave any permanent installation for the landlords benefit. This would mean I would need to buy a new chargepoint each move!
 

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Thanks for the reply, but under the rental term I’m obliged to leave any permanent installation for the landlords benefit. This would mean I would need to buy a new chargepoint each move!
Sounds like an odd clause. I rent out several properties in the UK.

I’m sure the landlord would be happy to make an exception in writing if you asked and promised to make good any repairs.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Sounds like an odd clause. I rent out several properties in the UK.

I’m sure the landlord would be happy to make an exception in writing if you asked and promised to make good any repairs.
Hi, already asked and they said it had to be left. Even asked if I could remove and make good but no go....
 

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Hi, already asked and they said it had to be left. Even asked if I could remove and make good but no go....
That’s what my previous landlord said. I just removed it and took it with me when I left. The post leaving inspector charged me £50 because I’d put a mug of tea on the windowsill on moving day, but didn’t do any examination of the electrical system (how could they, they’re not qualified) nor of the house exterior. It’s not like the landlord himself will ever come to look, he lived about 200 miles away and has probably never visited once.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
That’s what my previous landlord said. I just removed it and took it with me when I left. The post leaving inspector charged me £50 because I’d put a mug of tea on the windowsill on moving day, but didn’t do any examination of the electrical system (how could they, they’re not qualified) nor of the house exterior. It’s not like the landlord himself will ever come to look, he lived about 200 miles away and has probably never visited once.
This if a church house via an estate agent. They are pretty anal about everything. Even sent the permission to install through with the clause cut and paste out of the contract! And they want to see the install certification if/when we do it. Hey ho probably should have done it on the QT. However, RunnibgStrongs suggestion would work and only be leaving the bare minimum for the landlord.
 

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I try to deal fairly with my tenants with things like this:

I offer to pay for the materials if tenant will pay for labour. Thus I keep the benefit of the improvement, and tenant pays less than removing it and installing elsewhere. Would your landlord agree that?
 

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Of course if you installed something in the house without permission, you’d have to put it back the way you found it at your expense. :unsure:
 

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Cheaper than an Ohme I use one of these it’s never let me down, has no intelligent charging features but you can just set the charge timer on your car if you need to charge off peak or limit the charge to say 80%.

I can vouch for the build quality, it’s a good charger.
 

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How about running a new, independently isolated 6mm supply from the consumer unit to an external wall (where you'll locate the charger). Then when you move out, strip off the charger and stick a weatherproof 13 amp 3-pin socket in its place - pic shows one that costs all of £8.24 from Screwfix.
139007
 

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How about running a new, independently isolated 6mm supply from the consumer unit to an external wall (where you'll locate the charger). Then when you move out, strip off the charger and stick a weatherproof 13 amp 3-pin socket in its place
And if you put some sort of shielding around whatever you decide to attach to the wall (if you go with a 32A Commando it's probably a good idea anyway) it will be very hard for any subsequent investigation to establish what you originally put in the box or if/when it was substituted.
 

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Thanks for the reply, but under the rental term I’m obliged to leave any permanent installation for the landlords benefit. This would mean I would need to buy a new chargepoint each move!
Just take it with you IMO. My last rental I left trashed (as a thank you for the section 21 they sent me) and still got my deposit back. It’ll be fine I reckon - the dispute process can be easily manipulated in favour of the tenant IME.
 
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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
How about running a new, independently isolated 6mm supply from the consumer unit to an external wall (where you'll locate the charger). Then when you move out, strip off the charger and stick a weatherproof 13 amp 3-pin socket in its place - pic shows one that costs all of £8.24 from Screwfix. View attachment 139007
Nice idea thanks
 

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Nice idea thanks
A suggestion, building on what was said. Install the wiring etc out of site as much as poss. Mount the charger on a back board screwed into the mortar not the brick. When you leave, take the board off and repair the holes - no indication of what was there. If you're able to feed the cable through a mortar joint, there might not be any evidence anything was there at all in which case you can take everything away. If you can't put the cable through a mortar joint, then when you leave, do as chris suggested and put a cheap socket there.

To hide any signs of what is there, enclose it in a meter box (or a home made box), again, fitted to a backboard screwed into the mortar. Then when you leave, take the box away and no-one wil ever know what used to be there. They'll only see what you left

I'm aware the property may be inspected at regular intervals and it may be noticed that there was a charger fitted, and the tight fisted landlord may see the opportunity to improve his property by demanding your charger is left if he sees it. Putting it in a box stops it from being seen and if the box has a proper lock, he won't be able to look inside.

If asked about the box you can always say that you store a granny lead in the box rather than taking it inside with you. In use, all anyone will see is a lead with the car plug on the end. The charger will not be seen.

If the existence of a charger is ever discovered, remember, chargers don't last forever, and it would be typical bad luck if yours failed a month or so before you left forcing you to replace it with a 13A soocket so you can continue to charge the car with a granny lead ... of course, you'd leave the socket because you know you have to leave permanent installations.

If worse comes to worse, I'm not sure he will be able to demand the car charger is left, as long as you don't cause any detriment to the property. Repairing any installation in an invisible way would satisfy a court about that, but it's best to avoid that kind of escalation.

If you don't feel you can install and remove the charger without leaving some evidence, or if you feel teh existence of a charger will be found out, then get permission to install a 13A socket in a box to stop others stealing your electricity. Then, once it's been inspected, upgrade it to a charger mounted on a backboard. When you leave and remove the charger, you're leaving him with what he expected to have. If you replace the 40A cable to the charger with 13A, and replace the MCB, he won't know any different, and if everything looks neat and undamaged, the person doing the routine property inspection won't have a clue, they're simply not qualified.

Property management companies are the worst for this because they demonstrate to the owner how good they are by clawing back as much as they can from the tenant regardless of how fair it is. One company tried to charge me for the cost of mowing the lawn. Even when I pointed out that they inspected the garden one week after I left, and in a warm damp summer, grass actaully grows and need cutting. They still wouldn't relent, so I told them I'd start proceedings to get my deposit back and prime exhibit would be a photo of a neatly mowed lawn with my neighbour's son finishing it off, on the day of departure. I suggested they spoke to the owner to check he was happy to be sued about the matter... the deposit was handed back, without an apology.
 
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