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Discussion Starter #1
Hi -

I spoke to a seller whose 2013 Model S had a newer pack, motor and was in process of getting a new screen. He appeared to have a lot of knowledge and experience with Teslas and claimed to me that the 2012-2013 ones came with motors and packs that really would not hold up very well in the long run, but that if they had replacements (after a certain point?) then they should be good to go. I was interested in the vehicle because I've come to the conclusion over a few conversations that this point of view may be smart - that, if possible, if I can get a used Model S with a replaced pack and motor then that could be a score.

Is it common knowledge that packs and motors from that era might not hold up well over time? Or are there some who would like to say that he was misinformed or misinforming me?
 

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I don't own a model S yet, like you I'm looking and doing my research at the moment. But yes it well documented that early Tesla's developed a noticeable whirring or humming or vibration from the rear drive train after time. Tesla fitted several units under warranty, and some you tubers have done videos on it.

Also the batterys have been known to fail, and need replacing, although this is less common. Tesla mostly seem to have reduced the speed at which these cars can supercharge, to extend the life of the battery and reduce risk of fire.

At least this is as far as I know, but I'm just researching like you.
 

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Wasn't it that the QC on the bearings was very poor and this lead to the motor failing? They changed supplier and bearing type and now it's all good. You absolutely NEED a car which has had this done. A low mileage one might seem like a good idea but it also might not have been driven enough to see if the drive motor will fail....
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Wasn't it that the QC on the bearings was very poor and this lead to the motor failing? They changed supplier and bearing type and now it's all good. You absolutely NEED a car which has had this done. A low mileage one might seem like a good idea but it also might not have been driven enough to see if the drive motor will fail....
If there was a bearing issue on the motors, this almost reminds me of Porsche's issues with bearings on the Boxster.

With the packs, I don't know what the issue(s) have been but there is this NHTSA investigation:
Tesla is facing NHTSA probe over possible design flaw in older Model S cars
Fred Lambert
- Jul. 1st 2020 7:27 pm ET

Given the continued lack of robust BEV offerings from the competition in the US (or parts of the US) in a certain price range, I'd be glad someday to consider getting an older Tesla in good condition, especially one that has had some key components replaced under warranty. For a performance sedan that was new in 2012, it seems somewhat natural to me that there would have been issues, so I'm not posting to take petty pot-shots at Tesla, but at the same time, it seems like a good idea to communicate and improve our knowledge of what the issues were.

I'd love it if Tesla or one of its competitors would begin a practice of somehow making it transparent on vehicles, not only the information associated with the VIN, but with the motors and packs so that a buyer could tell how many miles are on those as well.
 
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