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Had a quick search but couldn’t find anything definitive.

I have a 2015 tekna spec leaf with the 17inch wheels. Looks wise I prefer them to the standard 16inch alloy.

But I have seen a few people mention they have swapped to the 16inch alloy for better tyre selection and cost, better economy and more comfort?

Anyone have figures for economy ?
Tyres do appear noticeably cheaper for the 16inch for a well known brand.

Tyres will need replacing in a few months time.

Thanks
 

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Had a quick search but couldn’t find anything definitive.

I have a 2015 tekna spec leaf with the 17inch wheels. Looks wise I prefer them to the standard 16inch alloy.

But I have seen a few people mention they have swapped to the 16inch alloy for better tyre selection and cost, better economy and more comfort?

Anyone have figures for economy ?
Tyres do appear noticeably cheaper for the 16inch for a well known brand.

Tyres will need replacing in a few months time.

Thanks
Watching this thread with interest.

I too have a 2016 Tekna with 17" wheels and while the ride quality was tolerable on the original Dunlop tyres (but still firmer than I'd like) it is now harsh on Michelin Cross Climates, so I'm considering picking up a set of 16" rims and fitting softer riding summer tyres for most of the year and leaving the harsher riding Cross Climates for winter duty! Tyres for the 16" rims are about half the price of the 17" and there is a much larger pool of different tyres available in the 16" size with options fairly limited for 17".

I'm not a fan of the Acenta wheel styling wise - does anyone know if the 16" rims from a Leaf 40 would fit, and whether the tyre pressure sensors would be compatible? I think they look quite a bit better than the 16" Acenta rims...
 

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LEAF N-TEC 62KW
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You don't need to change the rims to get a better ride.

Just fit Michelin Primacy 4 S2s as now fitted by Renault and Tesla. I have a pair on the front of my E+ (17") and the ride is better, tyre noise reduced, grip improved and the S2 version is A for efficiency and B for wet grip, 68db noise.

These so called all weather tyres are pointless in most of the UK and Cross Climates on a C5 diesel were not impressive.

I had no problems during the ice and snow last month with the Dunlops or the Michelins. If I still lived in the Highlands, I would have a set of steel rims with winter tyres. I did this years ago with a DS3 and it was unstoppable until the snow was too deep for the ground clearance.

Michelin Primacy 4 S2 Tyres at Blackcircles.com

Cheaper from Kwikfit but make sure you ask for the S2 version as there are three versions. S2 is A, B, 68, non S2 is B, A, 68,
 

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You don't need to change the rims to get a better ride.
Sorry but I can't agree - you're never going to get the same ride on a 17" rim that you will on a 16" or 15" rim. A larger rim is always going to be a sacrifice in ride quality, not just due to less cushioning form the tyre but also the increased un-sprung mass of the larger heavier wheel that increases harshness. If I'd had my choice of wheel on the Leaf (while still keeping other spec options) I would have definitely gone for the 16" rims not 17".
These so called all weather tyres are pointless in most of the UK and Cross Climates on a C5 diesel were not impressive.

I had no problems during the ice and snow last month with the Dunlops or the Michelins. If I still lived in the Highlands, I would have a set of steel rims with winter tyres. I did this years ago with a DS3 and it was unstoppable until the snow was too deep for the ground clearance.
On the contrary, a good winter rated all season tyre (you say all weather - are you from the US? :) ) is a good choice for the UK on a non-performance car like a Leaf as we don't get snow or ICE consistently enough or for long enough to warrant going the separate summer/winter tyre route. But when we do get snow/ice it can be bad enough that you'll be stuck in a summer tyre. Not sure where you live now but I live in Central Scotland, and we had a couple of weeks in January where there is no way at all I could have made my daily route on summer tyres.

One residential street in particular that we have to stop at on the way each morning and night is a steep hill that is never gritted and frequently has large patches of sheet ice. No real troubles on the CrossClimates (or Vredestein Quatrac 5 on my previous car) but many people who actually live on that street and are (presumably) using summer tyres were unable to get moving up the same hill I could drive up, stop and get moving on again later. I was routinely driving in places without issue where others were stuck, especially un gritted side streets, and I was able to park and drive safely on icy roads that I couldn't stand on without falling over without holding onto the car. (The Leaf headlights make great railings to hold onto... :ROFLMAO: )

I have no complaints about the grip of the Cross Climates - they have superior grip than the Dunlops in all conditions even summer, and dramatically better grip in cold wet conditions let alone ice and snow. The cold/wet grip is some of the best I have ever seen as they subjectively just don't seem to lose any grip in the wet - I can floor it from the traffic lights standing in a puddle with zero wheelspin and cornering in the wet is very confident. The factory Dunlops with most of their tread still present are lethal on cold wet roads and spin like crazy at the lights in the wet unless you feather the throttle. There is no comparison.

My only complaint with the Cross Climate is the ride quality and I'm pretty sure this is down to the choice of a 95 XL load rating when the car needs 91. The XL sidewalls are simply too stiff, especially in 50 profile. Maybe not as much of an issue on a 55/60 profile tyre.

If they would just make a non-XL version in 215/50/17 the ride would be dramatically improved. By the way when shopping for All Season tyres with 3PMS rating the vast majority of them in most sizes only come in XL load rating even across other brands. Not sure why that is but it's sure annoying.
Michelin Primacy 4 S2 Tyres at Blackcircles.com

Cheaper from Kwikfit but make sure you ask for the S2 version as there are three versions. S2 is A, B, 68, non S2 is B, A, 68,
If I wanted to drive on summer tyres in winter I would have just kept the Dunlops in winter. Contrary to what you're suggesting summer tyres just don't work safely in proper winter conditions, and I'm not interested chancing my luck.

I have summer tyres on my ICE car all year round however I simply choose not to drive that car if conditions are really bad. The Leaf is the car that is responsible for getting everyone to work and nursery on time no matter the weather.
 

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I'm sorry but in 50years of driving, swapping tyres, nowhere has anyone ever claimed a better ride from a smaller diameter tyre per se.
You are far more likely to notice a difference between brands of the same size and the best place to check this out is on the tyre review websites.
Yes, fitting a higher profile tyre may improve the ride but at the expense of handling, something which has always mattered to me.
The local single track road are badly maintained and just patched up by a man with a van anda a shovel but the ride of the Leaf is superb - as good as a C5 with hydraulic suspension and Cross Climates. There is no way I would even swap another owner for his 16" rims and expect a worthwhile improvement by raising the profile from 50 to 55.
It's each to his own.
 

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Sorry but I can't agree - you're never going to get the same ride on a 17" rim that you will on a 16" or 15" rim. A larger rim is always going to be a sacrifice in ride quality, not just due to less cushioning form the tyre but also the increased un-sprung mass of the larger heavier wheel that increases harshness. If I'd had my choice of wheel on the Leaf (while still keeping other spec options) I would have definitely gone for the 16" rims not 17".

On the contrary, a good winter rated all season tyre (you say all weather - are you from the US? :) ) is a good choice for the UK on a non-performance car like a Leaf as we don't get snow or ICE consistently enough or for long enough to warrant going the separate summer/winter tyre route. But when we do get snow/ice it can be bad enough that you'll be stuck in a summer tyre. Not sure where you live now but I live in Central Scotland, and we had a couple of weeks in January where there is no way at all I could have made my daily route on summer tyres.

One residential street in particular that we have to stop at on the way each morning and night is a steep hill that is never gritted and frequently has large patches of sheet ice. No real troubles on the CrossClimates (or Vredestein Quatrac 5 on my previous car) but many people who actually live on that street and are (presumably) using summer tyres were unable to get moving up the same hill I could drive up, stop and get moving on again later. I was routinely driving in places without issue where others were stuck, especially un gritted side streets, and I was able to park and drive safely on icy roads that I couldn't stand on without falling over without holding onto the car. (The Leaf headlights make great railings to hold onto... :ROFLMAO: )

I have no complaints about the grip of the Cross Climates - they have superior grip than the Dunlops in all conditions even summer, and dramatically better grip in cold wet conditions let alone ice and snow. The cold/wet grip is some of the best I have ever seen as they subjectively just don't seem to lose any grip in the wet - I can floor it from the traffic lights standing in a puddle with zero wheelspin and cornering in the wet is very confident. The factory Dunlops with most of their tread still present are lethal on cold wet roads and spin like crazy at the lights in the wet unless you feather the throttle. There is no comparison.

My only complaint with the Cross Climate is the ride quality and I'm pretty sure this is down to the choice of a 95 XL load rating when the car needs 91. The XL sidewalls are simply too stiff, especially in 50 profile. Maybe not as much of an issue on a 55/60 profile tyre.

If they would just make a non-XL version in 215/50/17 the ride would be dramatically improved. By the way when shopping for All Season tyres with 3PMS rating the vast majority of them in most sizes only come in XL load rating even across other brands. Not sure why that is but it's sure annoying.

If I wanted to drive on summer tyres in winter I would have just kept the Dunlops in winter. Contrary to what you're suggesting summer tyres just don't work safely in proper winter conditions, and I'm not interested chancing my luck.

I have summer tyres on my ICE car all year round however I simply choose not to drive that car if conditions are really bad. The Leaf is the car that is responsible for getting everyone to work and nursery on time no matter the weather.
As usual, Simon is spot on with his observations.
 

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I'm sorry but in 50years of driving, swapping tyres, nowhere has anyone ever claimed a better ride from a smaller diameter tyre per se.
You are far more likely to notice a difference between brands of the same size and the best place to check this out is on the tyre review websites.
Yes, fitting a higher profile tyre may improve the ride but at the expense of handling, something which has always mattered to me.
The local single track road are badly maintained and just patched up by a man with a van anda a shovel but the ride of the Leaf is superb - as good as a C5 with hydraulic suspension and Cross Climates. There is no way I would even swap another owner for his 16" rims and expect a worthwhile improvement by raising the profile from 50 to 55.
It's each to his own.
It's not a different diameter tyre but just a different profile, surely?
 

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I'm sorry but in 50years of driving, swapping tyres, nowhere has anyone ever claimed a better ride from a smaller diameter tyre per se.
And neither did I - I was talking about a smaller wheel rim not a smaller tyre rolling radius... The 16" and 17" wheels for the Leaf both have the same tyre rolling radius due to the different (55/50) tyre profile.
You are far more likely to notice a difference between brands of the same size and the best place to check this out is on the tyre review websites.
Yes, fitting a higher profile tyre may improve the ride but at the expense of handling, something which has always mattered to me.
50 profile is well down into the area of sacrificing significant ride quality for small handling improvement IMO. I find around 55-60 profile the sweet spot between ride and handling but that's my personal preference.
The local single track road are badly maintained and just patched up by a man with a van anda a shovel but the ride of the Leaf is superb - as good as a C5 with hydraulic suspension and Cross Climates. There is no way I would even swap another owner for his 16" rims and expect a worthwhile improvement by raising the profile from 50 to 55.
It's each to his own.
Funny you say C5 because my ICE car is a Hydractive 2 Xantia V6.... which runs on 205/60/15 Michelin tyres. And I'm sorry, but the ride quality of the Leaf is not "superb" at all. Your C5 must be in pretty bad shape if you believe that although to be fair, C5's don't ride anywhere near as well as the Xantia, and I've been in enough C5's to draw a comparison. (Is yours a Mk1/Mk2 or X7?)

The ride quality between the Xantia and the Leaf - even before I swapped the tyres to the harsher Cross climates is night and day, no contest whatsoever. The Xantia is like a magic carpet, supremely smooth, stable and unruffled, the Leaf is like.... an ordinary bumpy car with a slightly fidgety unsettled ride and very limited suspension travel which gets caught out by potholes and larger bumps. Despite the higher profile narrower tyres the Xantia gets around corners better than the Leaf too. (Although the Leaf does corner surprisingly well given its very rudimentary suspension - the low centre of gravity thanks to the under floor battery probably helps)

I've seen the claim on this forum many times from Leaf owners that the Leaf is a soft riding car but it simply is not true. Maybe compared to performance German cars that ride like a brick shit house it is, everything is relative after all, but compared to something that actually does genuinely ride well and has been optimised for ride comfort, no, the Leaf ride is very average and nothing to be impressed by.

I've been driving Hydraulic Citroen's on and off for nearly 30 years so I've become a bit spoilt when it comes to ride quality unfortunately, and the general trend for cars over the last 30 years (including Citroen) has been towards worse and worse ride quality in the name of "handling", to the point that it has gone too far now for most cars. You see people driving around in "family" cars with 40 profile tyres on them - just crazy.
 

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And neither did I - I was talking about a smaller wheel rim not a smaller tyre rolling radius... The 16" and 17" wheels for the Leaf both have the same tyre rolling radius due to the different (55/50) tyre profile.

50 profile is well down into the area of sacrificing significant ride quality for small handling improvement IMO. I find around 55-60 profile the sweet spot between ride and handling but that's my personal preference.

Funny you say C5 because my ICE car is a Hydractive 2 Xantia V6.... which runs on 205/60/15 Michelin tyres. And I'm sorry, but the ride quality of the Leaf is not "superb" at all. Your C5 must be in pretty bad shape if you believe that although to be fair, C5's don't ride anywhere near as well as the Xantia, and I've been in enough C5's to draw a comparison. (Is yours a Mk1/Mk2 or X7?)

The ride quality between the Xantia and the Leaf - even before I swapped the tyres to the harsher Cross climates is night and day, no contest whatsoever. The Xantia is like a magic carpet, supremely smooth, stable and unruffled, the Leaf is like.... an ordinary bumpy car with a slightly fidgety unsettled ride and very limited suspension travel which gets caught out by potholes and larger bumps. Despite the higher profile narrower tyres the Xantia gets around corners better than the Leaf too. (Although the Leaf does corner surprisingly well given its very rudimentary suspension - the low centre of gravity thanks to the under floor battery probably helps)

I've seen the claim on this forum many times from Leaf owners that the Leaf is a soft riding car but it simply is not true. Maybe compared to performance German cars that ride like a brick shit house it is, everything is relative after all, but compared to something that actually does genuinely ride well and has been optimised for ride comfort, no, the Leaf ride is very average and nothing to be impressed by.

I've been driving Hydraulic Citroen's on and off for nearly 30 years so I've become a bit spoilt when it comes to ride quality unfortunately, and the general trend for cars over the last 30 years (including Citroen) has been towards worse and worse ride quality in the name of "handling", to the point that it has gone too far now for most cars. You see people driving around in "family" cars with 40 profile tyres on them - just crazy.
Simon, your 16" rims would be (according to Wheel and Rim database)
6.5"jj x 16 ET40
66.1mm centre bore, 5 x 114.3 M12 bolting battern

Putting the same rim size into the database results in common fitting with;
Renault Kadjur 2015 to 2020 (check whether an option or base size)
Loads of Nissan cars, eg
Primera 2001-2008
Pulsar 2013-2018
Qashqai 2007-2021
Sentra 2013 - 2017
Leafs of course
etc
some of those older cars will be common in the scrappies and the wheels from them should be available for buttons...
 

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Please don’t compare the ride of a LEAF E+ with a standard LEAF, on the E+ it carries a lot more weight slung low down and the suspension has been adjusted to give more ground clearance. The result is a very nice comfortable riding car, even with the stock DUNLOP’s (which are very poor for grip).

Changing to a better tyre as @farmergiles has done is only going to enhance the already smooth ride, I am happy to be correct, but I don’t believe that it is possible to fit 16” rims to the E+ because of the reduced ground clearance.

That said, fitting 16” rims rather than 17” rims will give a better ride, as this was my experience with a Mini, and I wouldn’t see why doing the same with a larger car would be any different.
 

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And neither did I - I was talking about a smaller wheel rim not a smaller tyre rolling radius... The 16" and 17" wheels for the Leaf both have the same tyre rolling radius due to the different (55/50) tyre profile.

50 profile is well down into the area of sacrificing significant ride quality for small handling improvement IMO. I find around 55-60 profile the sweet spot between ride and handling but that's my personal preference.

Funny you say C5 because my ICE car is a Hydractive 2 Xantia V6.... which runs on 205/60/15 Michelin tyres. And I'm sorry, but the ride quality of the Leaf is not "superb" at all. Your C5 must be in pretty bad shape if you believe that although to be fair, C5's don't ride anywhere near as well as the Xantia, and I've been in enough C5's to draw a comparison. (Is yours a Mk1/Mk2 or X7?)

The ride quality between the Xantia and the Leaf - even before I swapped the tyres to the harsher Cross climates is night and day, no contest whatsoever. The Xantia is like a magic carpet, supremely smooth, stable and unruffled, the Leaf is like.... an ordinary bumpy car with a slightly fidgety unsettled ride and very limited suspension travel which gets caught out by potholes and larger bumps. Despite the higher profile narrower tyres the Xantia gets around corners better than the Leaf too. (Although the Leaf does corner surprisingly well given its very rudimentary suspension - the low centre of gravity thanks to the under floor battery probably helps)

I've seen the claim on this forum many times from Leaf owners that the Leaf is a soft riding car but it simply is not true. Maybe compared to performance German cars that ride like a brick shit house it is, everything is relative after all, but compared to something that actually does genuinely ride well and has been optimised for ride comfort, no, the Leaf ride is very average and nothing to be impressed by.

I've been driving Hydraulic Citroen's on and off for nearly 30 years so I've become a bit spoilt when it comes to ride quality unfortunately, and the general trend for cars over the last 30 years (including Citroen) has been towards worse and worse ride quality in the name of "handling", to the point that it has gone too far now for most cars. You see people driving around in "family" cars with 40 profile tyres on them - just crazy.
The Leaf E+ is certainly not a soft riding car but I'm sure I read that the 2020 models had revised settings and I would rather sacrifice a little ride comfort for the better handing that the slightly lower profile tyres give.

This tyre review site is useful for comparisons:


For all season tyres, the Cross Climates don't do to well, being 5th out of 10, poor for noise and comfort, as well as expensive. Goodyear's Vector came first.
 

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Please don’t compare the ride of a LEAF E+ with a standard LEAF, on the E+ it carries a lot more weight slung low down and the suspension has been adjusted to give more ground clearance. The result is a very nice comfortable riding car, even with the stock DUNLOP’s (which are very poor for grip).
Ah ok - I hadn't noticed @farmergiles was driving the 62kW E+, I am referring strictly to the Leaf 30. So I can't comment on the ride of the E+.
 

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On both of our Teknas ('64 24kWh and '65 30kWh) we have swapped from the standard 17" wheels to the optional (according to the door sticker) 16" wheels with the homologated 205/55/R16 tyres. In both cases we have gone with Goodyear EcoPerformance, in one case from the same make/model and the other a different brand, both originally from 215/50/R17. There has been a reduction in harshness in both cases but a slight loss in response and initial feel on turn in - both probably due to the larger sidewall. There is an about 4% increase in range BUT the overall diameter is around 2.4% smaller so it is only about 1.5% improvement in reality. There is no noticeable reduction in grip - I suspect that the LEAF doesn't control the camber of the wheels particularly well and that the greater width is wasted, but I don't have the car for outright performance and handling as I have other toys for that.

For us the benefits are:
  • greater protection from the potholes which proliferate in our bit of the Country

  • significant reduction in cost of the tyres

  • slight reduction in rolling resistance giving greater range

  • easier to maintain wheel designs - the "diamond cut" standard wheels seem to suffer from corrosion
It's each to their own, but I'd recommend it for that model of car - likewise I can't comment on the e+ 62kWh. Generally cars are supplied in the UK are given unnecessarily low profile tyres for fashion reason, in the same way that they are often fitted with rear "spoilers".

@freddym - that's a wider list than I was aware of, but I'll add the Joke to that which along with the Qashqui has identical wheels to those on the LEAF30 "Black" edition which has allowed us to remain with fully homologated options for the car.
 

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On both of our Teknas ('64 24kWh and '65 30kWh) we have swapped from the standard 17" wheels to the optional (according to the door sticker) 16" wheels with the homologated 205/55/R16 tyres. In both cases we have gone with Goodyear EcoPerformance, in one case from the same make/model and the other a different brand, both originally from 215/50/R17. There has been a reduction in harshness in both cases but a slight loss in grip and initial feel on turn in - both probably due to the larger sidewall. There is an about 4% increase in range BUT the overall diameter is around 2.4% smaller so it is only about 1.5% improvement in reality. There is no noticeable reduction in grip - I suspect that the LEAF doesn't control the camber of the wheels particularly well and that the greater width is wasted, but I don't have the car for outright performance and handling as I have other toys for that.

For us the benefits are:
  • greater protection from the potholes which proliferate in our bit of the Country

  • significant reduction in cost of the tyres

  • slight reduction in rolling resistance giving greater range

  • easier to maintain wheel designs - the "diamond cut" standard wheels seem to suffer from corrosion
It's each to their own, but I'd recommend it. Generally cars are supplied in the UK are given unnecessarily low profile tyres for fashion reason, in the same way that they are often fitted with rear "spoilers".
I agree that often the wheel size is more of a marketing exercise than a necessity, at least for vehicles with modest performance.

I have never understood why the boy racers insist on fitting massive wheels and ultra low profile rubber just for a particular 'look'. They obviously have no interest in their cars handling and cornering.

Having said that, I might fit lowering springs to mine just to 'fill the wheelarches' & improve the cornering.....
 

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The Leaf E+ is certainly not a soft riding car but I'm sure I read that the 2020 models had revised settings and I would rather sacrifice a little ride comfort for the better handing that the slightly lower profile tyres give.
Sorry, didn't notice you were driving the 62 E+, of which I have no direct experience having only driven my 30. (I was hoping to get a chance to drive a 40/62 loaner when I had mine serviced recently but Nissan botched up the courtesy car leaving me to catch a bus to work...and even if they hadn't I would have probably got a Juke or similar...)

While I doubt it would ride as well as a Xantia (not much does..) it may ride better than the Leaf 30, I have no way of knowing.
This tyre review site is useful for comparisons:


For all season tyres, the Cross Climates don't do to well, being 5th out of 10, poor for noise and comfort, as well as expensive. Goodyear's Vector came first.
Interestingly I watched many of tyre reviews videos before buying the Cross Climates as he did recommend them quite favourably in many other comparison reviews - that specific video you linked to was released after I'd already bought them... and it does still rate very highly in many of the performance metrics.

The problem with an overall rating is it doesn't take into account what you want from the tyre - for example do you want an all season tyre that performs very well in the summer, or performs very well in the winter? Better to look at the individual categories and make your own weighted decision based on that.

Would I buy the same CrossClimate's again? No, because I value ride comfort too much. Would I consider buying them if they brought them out in 91 instead of 95 XL? Maybe...
 

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Sorry, didn't notice you were driving the 62 E+, of which I have no direct experience having only driven my 30. (I was hoping to get a chance to drive a 40/62 loaner when I had mine serviced recently but Nissan botched up the courtesy car leaving me to catch a bus to work...and even if they hadn't I would have probably got a Juke or similar...)

While I doubt it would ride as well as a Xantia (not much does..) it may ride better than the Leaf 30, I have no way of knowing.

Interestingly I watched many of tyre reviews videos before buying the Cross Climates as he did recommend them quite favourably in many other comparison reviews - that specific video you linked to was released after I'd already bought them... and it does still rate very highly in many of the performance metrics.

The problem with an overall rating is it doesn't take into account what you want from the tyre - for example do you want an all season tyre that performs very well in the summer, or performs very well in the winter? Better to look at the individual categories and make your own weighted decision based on that.

Would I buy the same CrossClimate's again? No, because I value ride comfort too much. Would I consider buying them if they brought them out in 91 instead of 95 XL? Maybe...
Some tyres work better on some vehicles than others so you need to read as many reviews as possible to arrive at a consensus.

It's always the case that once you made a choice, something better goes on sale a week later.

The Goodyears look good but I'm not convinced that you can make a tyre that combines the best of a summer and a winter one. They are a compromise it seems to me, and even this winter, the Dunlop & Michelins were fine.
 

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Some tyres work better on some vehicles than others so you need to read as many reviews as possible to arrive at a consensus.
Yep, did all that, watched many reviews from many sources, canvased drivers on here for opinions etc... nobody even mentioned harsh ride in any reviews so it was a major let down driving away from the tyre shop to find that the ride was much harsher than the Dunlops they replaced... the difference was not subtle.

Also disappointing as I'm a long time Michelin fan, have Michelins on the Xantia and have never bought a "bad" Michelin tyre before.
The Goodyears look good but I'm not convinced that you can make a tyre that combines the best of a summer and a winter one. They are a compromise it seems to me, and even this winter, the Dunlop & Michelins were fine.
Looking at the "winner" of that comparison, Goodyear Vector 4Seasons Gen 3, there is a major problem.

Not available in 215/50/17! :confused: (At least not via Blackcircles or a couple of others I've checked)

It is available in 205/55/16, in both 91 and 94 XL load rating. (given my experience I would absolutely go for the 91 variant for ride comfort)

The choice of tyres in the Tekna 215/50/17 size is very limited, and this is a good example. Many of the other possible candidates I can rule out simply because they don't come in this size.

Changing the car to Acenta rim sizes would open up a much larger choice of tyres and typically at half the price.
 

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Yep, did all that, watched many reviews from many sources, canvased drivers on here for opinions etc... nobody even mentioned harsh ride in any reviews so it was a major let down driving away from the tyre shop to find that the ride was much harsher than the Dunlops they replaced... the difference was not subtle.

Looking at the "winner" of that comparison, Goodyear Vector 4Seasons Gen 3, there is a major problem.

Not available in 215/50/17! :confused: (At least not via Blackcircles or a couple of others I've checked)

It is available in 205/55/16, in both 91 and 94 XL load rating. (given my experience I would absolutely go for the non-XL variant)

The choice of tyres in the Tekna 205/50/17 size is very limited, and this is a good example. Many of the other possible candidates I can rule out simply because they don't come in this size.

Changing the car to Acenta rim sizes would open up a much larger choice of tyres and typically at half the price.
Yes, I'd be sick if the new tyres were harsher than the previous.

I originally ordered some Bridgestones,which were A,A,70 but only available in 91H rating. I thought, wrongly, that as the max speed of the Leaf is well under the 113mph of a H rated tyre, they be fine. Kwikfit said no - not possible to fit tyres of a speed rating lower than Nissan specify in the owmers manual, which is Y.

I was a bit surprised to find a car as heavy as a Leaf E used 91 non XL load rated tyres. The C5 (v6 auto) and my Brera (3.2V6 awd) both needed 98XLs.
 
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