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'18 Zoe ZE 40 R110 + '21 VW ID.4 1st
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I have seen several discussions on here lately about the accuracy of ABetterRoutePlanner, and it seems folks always like to bring up the hypothetical "drive to Edinburgh" as an example of how accurate/inaccurate ABRP likely is. Well, last week Scotland finally opened up again, and on a whim I decided to look at hotel prices. I found a nice hotel with free EV charging for less than £100/night, and so I decided to put ABRP to the test!

This was not a perfect test, and I had my family along with me and we were eager to get there, but I did my best to put as much information into ABRP as possible in order to get an accurate estimate of what the journey would look like. For reference, this was in a Volkswagen ID.4, the total trip length was 660 miles, and the weather was fairly mild (10-12 C the whole drive, bit of rain on the way back). I set ACC to 70 while driving, and only exceeded that to pass lorries a few times.

Leg 1 (Peterborough-Leeds):

We stopped to charge earlier than we needed to, mostly because we left home around 4 PM and the kids were getting hungry. ABRP said we'd arrive at the Ionity in Leeds with 39% battery, and that we should be able to make it the rest of the way as long as we charged up to 95% or so.

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In actuality we arrived at the Ionity chargers with 49% battery remaining. Average consumption was 2.9 mpkWh, and average speed was 47 mph. There was some traffic on tha A1(M) north, which would account for the lower average speed and some of the difference in battery consumption, but I was still surprised to get to Leeds with 10% more battery than I was expecting. We charged to 97% (still pulling over 40 kW!) and left.

Leg 2 (Leeds - Edinburgh):

This leg was a wash unfortunately - my wife drove for the first hour and a half, and she has quite the lead foot.... (I frequently glanced over to the dash and saw 75-80 indicated). We ended up having to stop in Newcastle for a quick 15-minute top-up (yay Instavolt!), but since both the route and the speeds were so far off what I planned, there is little point in comparing this leg. For reference, however, we arrived at the hotel with 16% battery to find the 7 kW charger occupied by another ID.4. Luckily we had brought our granny cable and the 3-pin was free, so we just plugged into that and slow-charged up to 100% shortly before leaving on Sunday morning.

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Leg 3 (Edinburgh - Thirsk):

Other than some occasional rain and a very brief AC charge while grabbing lunch, this leg went according to plan. The numbers won't be exactly right since we we did plug into an Ecotricity AC pump while popping into a Mcdonalds, but we only added 3.7 kWh (5% battery) so that can be accounted for.

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ABRP said we'd arrive at the Instavolt with 9% (14% if you include the brief AC charge). In actuality we arrived with 25%, a fairly significant difference. Average speed on this leg was 54 mph, and average consumption was 3.0 mpkWh. ABRP said we'd need at least 85% to get home with 10% remaining, so we charged up to 87% and left.

Leg 4 (Thirsk - Peterborough):

This final leg was to our dog sitter's house just outside Peterborough. It was by far the most representative for "motorway driving", as our average speed was a whopping 66 mph.

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ABRP said we'd get there with 13%, actual arrival was 25% remaining (12% difference). Average consumption for this leg was 2.9 mpkWh, which in my opinion is not great, but not terrible for a 2,660 kg family SUV on mostly motorways. 2.9 mpkWh gives a maximum range of 223 miles, though the average consumption for the entire trip was just over 3.0 giving a bit more than 230 mile range.

Final thoughts: ABRP definitely overestimates battery usage on long trips. I'd rather they overestimate than underestimate, but at the same time I wish it was a bit closer to reality given I changed all the underlying numbers to better simulate my actual driving style. ABRP's routing could also use some work - originally the route it gave me from Leeds to Edinburgh was mostly on back roads, which were definitely shorter than driving up the coast on the A1, but would have taken a lot longer.

I hope this helps folks plan longer trips in their EV's in the future!
 

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What was the target speed on ABRP?
And what was your true speed adjusting for speedometer inaccuracies (if you're aware of any)?
 

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'18 Zoe ZE 40 R110 + '21 VW ID.4 1st
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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
What was the target speed on ABRP?
And what was your true speed adjusting for speedometer inaccuracies (if you're aware of any)?
Target speed was 70 - for most of the journey I had the ACC on 70 indicated (which I've calculated to be about 68 actual). I do tend to pass early, so it didn't drop below that often, and there were stretches I'd set the ACC to 72 indicated (70 actual).
 

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ABRP has been known to assume battery degradation of 10% - did you set that parameter?
 

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They have almost no data for an id4 so far. So your results are not that surprising, at least as you say it is pessimistic, which is way better than stranding you somewhere! Once they collect some more data from users real journeys they will build a model for the id4 and it should provide better predictions. Your experience demonstrates the reason why the constant trotting out of abrp with regards to brand new cars to me seems a bit silly really.
I should have a trip to Scotland (Edinburgh as it happens) coming up for a family wedding later this year (for some reason it got postponed last year), so if there's any top tips re cards I must have etc please do share!
I will be using abrp to suggest the route I should follow, I think their Kona consumption model is more mature, so fingers crossed it comes up with something semi sensible.
 

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Hope you enjoyed your trip, Edinburgh is a great place!

And the ID.4 did not disappoint, I'm assuming?
 

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Similar for my Soul - ABRP is way pessimistic (better that way round!) - hence why I say that despite what it says the Soul is a genuine 200+ mile car at motorway speeds in ALMOST all weathers....
 

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The claimed WLTP range is a factor between mixed city driving and fully highway driving until battery depletion.
The city portion of the test has lowspeed cycle and high speed city driving.
They also factor in cold battery vs the battery after having reach its opperational temperature.
Im pretty sure that if you dig hard enough somewhere is writen what is the full HW range
 

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VW ID.3 Worst Edition & Tesla M3 LR
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The claimed WLTP range is a factor between mixed city driving and fully highway driving until battery depletion.
The city portion of the test has lowspeed cycle and high speed city driving.
They also factor in cold battery vs the battery after having reach its opperational temperature.
Im pretty sure that if you dig hard enough somewhere is writen what is the full HW range
This is a good point, and one that a lot of people miss in their rush to put the boot in to XYZ brand.

What range/economy you get from your car is almost as individual as you are.

If you drive your car in a similar way to the WLTP test cycle, you’ll get similar efficiency to the WLTP test results, and why wouldn’t you?

If, like me, your typical journey is 7 miles to the A1/M-way, then 160 miles of running at the NSL followed by another 7 miles of A roads, then you’ll get less.

Unless I knew how people drove and on what roads in what conditions, I wouldn’t dare to make a proclamation about efficiency.
 

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In the good old days the company's would display loud and clear the City and HW fuel consumption values.
And while the test got quite outdated the highway value was quite reasonable.
Nowadays they generally display only the combined WLTP value which while more reasonable doesn’t tell anything for the consumers!! After all now we can't calculate our own average based on our own mix!
 

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I'm confused - the OP said that the real range was about 230 miles, whereas the claimed spec says 310 miles - how is that better?
[/QUOTE.]

According to this Website the cold weather (-10c and heating on) range for HW is 295 km (183mi) and the mild weather (23c and no AC) range is 375km (233 mi)

So I would say that the OP experience was quite inöine with what can be expeted.
 

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They have almost no data for an id4 so far. So your results are not that surprising, at least as you say it is pessimistic, which is way better than stranding you somewhere! Once they collect some more data from users real journeys they will build a model for the id4 and it should provide better predictions. Your experience demonstrates the reason why the constant trotting out of abrp with regards to brand new cars to me seems a bit silly really.
I should have a trip to Scotland (Edinburgh as it happens) coming up for a family wedding later this year (for some reason it got postponed last year), so if there's any top tips re cards I must have etc please do share!
I will be using abrp to suggest the route I should follow, I think their Kona consumption model is more mature, so fingers crossed it comes up with something semi sensible.
They build in a 10% buffer on new cars or any other cars for which they don’t have a lot of live data collected - which is probably most cars that aren’t a Tesla.

For the Kona, I use Premium ABRP and set reference consumption to 4.0 - 4.1 and it’s extremely accurate, IME.

Rapid charging in Scotland north of Glasgow and west of Perth is where the problems are and where you absolutely (currently at least) need to have a ChargePlace Scotland RFID card as that’s literally the only option. The chargers are often neglected and it seems to be pot luck as to whether the one you want / need to use will actually be operational - just check out some of the locations and comments on ZapMap/PlugShare.

Charging in the central belt will generally be fine - I’d just go to an Osprey / Instavolt to be honest and ignore the rest unless needs must.
 

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310 miles according to VW...
Immaterial, however, as the original meaning has now been clarified.
VW, in line with all manufacturers, are just quoting the official tested WLTP figures.

Real world range will be in the region of 185 to 270 miles, dependent on a lot of factors.

As the OPs journey will have been nothing like the WLTP test, he quite understandably got nothing like the WLTP figures.
 
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