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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking to buy a 3 year old Outlander PHEV but I noticed that the paint is separated from the top of the rear axle cross-member in a couple of places as there is rust underneath it and also there is surface rust on the sills where the body joins the undertray. The main dealer says this is normal in their area as they are by the sea and they won't do anything to rectify it. I wanted the AA to have a look at it to see if this was something for me to worry about but apparently they don't inspect electric cars.... I can see their business struggling in years to come. Please could someone tell me if this is normal for Outlanders, should I just walk away from the car and not buy it or what is the best thing to do to rectify it/stop it getting any worse? The car seems well priced and is low mileage but I don't want to waste my money so I am prepared to walk away if necessary. I just need a bit of peace of mind before parting with the cash.

I know there is an anti-perforation warranty but presumably that only comes into effect if the rust perforates the metal completely. The condition is certainly nowhere near that stage yet and I would guess that it still wouldn't be by the time the warranty runs out as the cross-member is a big old chunk of metal, but it might devalue the car and might lead to problems after the warranty has expired.

Any comments greatly appreciated.

Thanks

Tim
 

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Wouldn't touch any car that new with visible rust anywhere like that. I'd not expect to see sill rust until Car was at least 10. Probably much older.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thank you for your responses, you may have saved me from making a big mistake.

What a shame though, I was really looking forward to getting it on Friday.

Thanks
 

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I guess my lemon of a Nissan is worse than I thought then. 2016 model and the underneath has visible rust on the suspension and bodywork.
Shame, as a first impression of an electric future I’m getting less and less impressed by the day.
 

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Actually most cars have rust on the suspension components. Especially forged or cast parts as these are often simply painted, on the basis that rust will not cause a structural problem before parts of the component, like the ball joint, fail.
On most sheet formed parts the rust starts at the edges, as the electrostaticly applied powder coat/paint does not go on as evenly at edges of a part and they can often be virtually unpainted. The same thing happens with body shells at sharp panel edges, as most body shells are now electrostatically painted so paint thickness is good/even on panels but not on edges. Many makers apply a sealant on areas such as sills so softening the edges and then increasing the paint coverage.
The penetration guarantee is all about rusting from the inside out, ie you dont know its rusting until the hole appears on the outside. If you can see it you have to get it repaired to keep the warranty valid, ie if you get a chip that rusts on the outside dont leave it because when it rusts through you wont be covered by any warranty.
With so many used vehicles being available, I think the best thing to do is to walk away, especially if its come from a salt laden environment.
Many vehicles have nothing more underneath than the dipped basecoat (the vehicle goes through a bath of initial paint material to flood all unseen areas) this is the case when you can see a coloured sealant at panel overlaps. And is actually adequate. especially in areas that are subsequently covered, ie behind fuel tanks, bayyery pack, behind arch liners.
With so many vehicles being initially owned for two or three years, bluntly who cares. Its really an issue when a vehicle is actually purchased with a view to longer term ownership. If that is you, then I would consider checking the underside, and where any signs of rust are seen, wire brush them, and at least hammerite them (Smooth not hammer). Be carefull with underbody ruberised sprays as if they dont stick properly, you can make things worse as water will get between the panel and the spray and be held there.
I have seen older Mercedes with 3mm of rubber underneath, and no metal behind, as the rubber had held moisture and the panels rotted from behind.
 

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I'm considering purchasing a used 2014 outlander and I have viewed 2 so far. I have a lot of experience running older vehicles and doing body repairs/welding on them (I currently run 2x transit vans).

The underside is standard japanese finish, not much seam sealer, not much underseal. If you buy one, it would pay to have it treated at a waxoyl/dinitrol service center who can do cavity wax injection and underbody wax spraying.

The 2 I looked at, one was starting to develop surface rust on the boot floor and the rear subframe, nothing major, but it wouldn't last 10 years without care. Lancer's also rust badly, I would expect the Outlander to be no different. I also viewed a 58 plate outlander the other week, that was pretty seriously rusty around the rear arches/steps.

Don't buy one that has a towbar, it might have been used to launch a boat. Also, try and buy one that has been used in/around middle england, as far away from the sea as possible.

The mitsubishi anti-perforation warranty is not worth the paper it is printed on - it only covers the body panels like doors/boot/wings/roof, doesn't cover anything underneath and doesn't cover damage caused by salt.
 
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What exactly does "rubberized" mean, and how does one know whether a coating product is rubberized or not? I know some spray cans include the text "rubberized", but many other products aren't as explicit.


Be carefull with underbody ruberised sprays as if they dont stick properly, you can make things worse as water will get between the panel and the spray and be held there.
I have seen older Mercedes with 3mm of rubber underneath, and no metal behind, as the rubber had held moisture and the panels rotted from behind.
 
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