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Maybe I live a sheltered life in a leafy Essex cul-de-sac but I came across one of these delivering to a few houses near me. It was a Mercedes-Benz panel van in UPS livery.
I waved at the driver and he stopped, looking quite puzzled. I just said "Nice electric van". He seemed pleased and said "Thank you very much and have a nice day".
Driving an EV does seem to have a beneficial effect on people's behaviour.馃槆
 

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Unlike their diesel brethren.

Not worried about you cycling into anyone, but do you have some kind of monitoring for your drivers not doing this? I wouldn't expect you to, but with delivery becoming more important and drivers often being paid per delivery, I'm not sure whether to blame the company or the driver. As I rather rate you and you're in the business, I'm wondering how you feel about it.
 

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Not worried about you cycling into anyone, but do you have some kind of monitoring for your drivers not doing this? I wouldn't expect you to, but with delivery becoming more important and drivers often being paid per delivery, I'm not sure whether to blame the company or the driver. As I rather rate you and you're in the business, I'm wondering how you feel about it.
Good question.

We have our bikes camera'd up, so a basic front and rear facing system recording continuously on loop. Obviously if there is a bump it's reliant on the rider owning up first for us to become aware if the car etc is left unoccupied. Realistically, the cameras are for evidence if our bikes/riders are hit or victims of punishment passes from impatient drivers, as some of the bikes are quite big and drivers regularly don't realise how big until they are alongside.

As for the "last mile" deliveries, the big problem is that most drivers are on price per parcel. I know of Amazon drivers who've been expected to deliver 150+ parcels a day on the run up to Christmas at under 拢0.80 per drop. Realistically, you can only manage 12 drops an hour, so that creates extremely long working days, so mistakes are certainly more likely.

For my part we pay our riders a guaranteed hourly rate based on the Living Wage Foundation minimum cost of living which is currently 拢9.50/hour outside of London, but still with the option to increase earnings dependent on the number of deliveries each day. Therefore if a rider has a bad day it doesn't affect their whole week, just the day in question. All of my staff are fully employed, have access to Workplace pensions, can join a union, get paid holidays and time off in lieu/additional pay for working Bank Holidays, while I, the employer pay the correct Employers National Insurance too.

We do quite a bit of Public Sector work too. The tenders have a stipulation written in that you must be a Living Wage Foundation employer to have any chance of getting the work.

Your staff are the most important asset of the business. Looking after them and paying a fair wage/salary for the work they do should be a prerequisite. Without staff there is no business.

Amazon and their ilk are on a race to the bottom where cutting costs to the bone is regarded as normal. Going back to the article at the start of the thread, it isn't Amazon themselves who are putting electric vans on the roads but their delivery partners i.e. the contractors they are working with. All that Amazon do is facilitate the leasing of the vans at a price that makes them comparable to diesel vans once tax, maintenance and fuel savings are taken into consideration.
When they want you to supply up to 50 vans as a delivery partner, but only expect profits to be between 拢100-150K/annum across those 50 vans it's a very one sided partnership.

I wouldn't open my eyes, let alone get out of bed for the meagre profits Amazon pay their contractors. They make a big deal about their technology, but there are plenty of pay by the use apps out there that do the job just as well if contractors weren't tied into their ecosystem.
 
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