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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all, I’m new here; just got a 7.5 GTE..

is there a target battery level I should charge to?
I understand with a full EV, its best to stick to something like 20-80%, but the battery on a PHEV is a lot smaller and will inevitably go through far more charges.

Is there a best practice, or should I just charge away to minimise ICE use?

thanks in advance
 

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Kia Soul EV 2020
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Charge and drive the car! I know it sounds stupid, but just charge and drive. The golf has sufficient buffer both at the top and at the bottom, so don't worry too much.

Something to consider is getting an extended VW warranty, if your car is out of manufacturers warranty. They are complex cars and if something breaks, it is usually expensive. Also, check if you car has had a battery recall, there were some cars that needed to have their traction battery opened and checked for leaks. In case of problems, VW changed some batteries, brand new if I'm not mistaken.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Not that stupid - I thought that was how it works.
I’ll check out the warranties, but it’s not that old yet//
It’s on a lease, so I’m not too worried about degradation, but would still rather not trash it for the sake of being a little more careful..
Thank you. 👍🏻
 

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Not that stupid - I thought that was how it works.
I’ll check out the warranties, but it’s not that old yet//
It’s on a lease, so I’m not too worried about degradation, but would still rather not trash it for the sake of being a little more careful..
Thank you. 👍🏻
I loved the car when I had it. For 4 years, charged it almost every night during the winters, as it could not do my commute in the cold. I could almost do 3 days on one charge in the hot of summer. The best I had was almost 1200miles on a tank, with people on here reporting upwards of 2000miles. No point in mentioning MPG.... :giggle: :giggle:

So, as I said: charge and drive. And don't forget: GTE stands for "Get There Early".
 

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With such a small battery you need to use the full capacity - most journeys I do I run from 100% down to 0%.

I try to leave the battery at 80% until I need it, and use departure timers to charge to 100% just before I leave.

Likewise I try not to leave the battery at 0% for extended periods.

Other than that - just enjoy it, it is a great car.
 

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Kona64
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As with Tudor, I had one for 4years and I charged the HV battery to "full" 2 or 3 times a day .

One tip ------ if you have to drive further than the HV battery will manage, chuck the car into Hybrid as soon as possible, and then when you are X miles from finishing back home, then switch back to eMode and drain the battery, getting home without the engine coming back on.
Works best for a 40mile or 200mile trip to get max mpg from the unleaded.
I'd get 55-60mpg on a long run doing this including motorways and major city centres.

The worst drive time for a PHEV like the GTE is when the HV battery has gone to 0, and the petrol engine kicks in -- on the VAG products the engine management systems tries to both drive the car and recharge the HV back up to 3-4 miles of EV range --- the mpg at this stage is crap.
If you reset the trip computer when the engine wakes up with 0 HV battery range, and you drive 5-10miles during this state, you'll see what I mean.
If you reset the trip computer when the HV has 5+ miles in it, and drive those same 5-10miles, the mpg will be much higher.

Off course you'll spend days trying to get a high miles per kWh, days trying to eek out as many miles as you can from a "full" battery --- and then ruin it all by pressing the GTE button on some cracking roads . Bliss.
 
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I understand with a full EV, its best to stick to something like 20-80%, but the battery on a PHEV is a lot smaller and will inevitably go through far more charges.
Take that with a pinch of salt, what matters is the state of charge of the actual battery cell, which is not what the car reports because manufacturers reserve some of the battery capacity. The GTE has a significant battery buffer built into it already - the Passat only lets you use ~10kWh of a ~13kWh battery (I think the mk7.5 Golf is the same). I forget exactly how the buffer is distributed, I think it's something like the bottom 10% and top 20% are reserved, so when you do a full charge, you're getting something similar to a 20-80% charge anyway. So if you limit yourself to only using the middle 60% of the usable range, you're really only using the middle 45%(...? morning maths...) of the actual battery. Sure, your battery would probably last forever if you did this, but that's because you'd be barely using it.

PHEVs tend to have much bigger battery buffers than full EVs - partly because their batteries get cycled an awful lot more, and partly because they don't need the full battery range to keep mobile. Fundamentally, the same recommendations apply to the battery regardless of what kind of vehicle it is in (VW physics is the same as Nissan physics is the same as Hyundai physics...), but how much it matters in a specific vehicle depends on how the manufacturer have chosen to use the battery. Compare the GTE usable battery to something like an ID3, where you can use something like 90-95% of the actual battery capacity - that's where you need to have a think about whether you need a full charge or not.

Also, different vehicles will have slightly different battery chemistries, which will have slightly different recommendations. There are no hard and fast rules here.
 

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One tip ------ if you have to drive further than the HV battery will manage, chuck the car into Hybrid as soon as possible, and then when you are X miles from finishing back home, then switch back to eMode and drain the battery, getting home without the engine coming back on.
I go for a slight variation on this - keep it in EV until you're on the first bit of open road, then whack it into Hybrid. When I pull out of my house, there is a slight uphill, a little start/stop (a few T junctions in quick succession) then a nice big stretch of open country road. If I immediately go to Hybrid, the engine fires up as soon as I get to the uphill and I end up using a cold engine for the start/stop. The real world difference this makes for me is next to nothing, but it makes me feel better.
 

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Kona64
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I go for a slight variation on this - keep it in EV until you're on the first bit of open road, then whack it into Hybrid. When I pull out of my house, there is a slight uphill, a little start/stop (a few T junctions in quick succession) then a nice big stretch of open country road. If I immediately go to Hybrid, the engine fires up as soon as I get to the uphill and I end up using a cold engine for the start/stop. The real world difference this makes for me is next to nothing, but it makes me feel better.
Quite agree --- nothing worse than coming to a halt at traffic lights and the engine won't cut out.
Same as arriving at home when it's just kicked in and you put the handbrake on and the darn thing keeps spouting fumes.
 

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100% charge on the GTE is around 94% real battery charge.

If you are going on a long trip fully charge the car.

For shorter journeys aim to charge 25-30% more than expected so 10 mile trip go for 13 miles charge.

This will improve long term battery pack life.
 

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100% charge on the GTE is around 94% real battery charge.

If you are going on a long trip fully charge the car.

For shorter journeys aim to charge 25-30% more than expected so 10 mile trip go for 13 miles charge.

This will improve long term battery pack life.
No! You might faff about, as you describe, in an all electric car where you can fully charge and fully discharge the battery. In a PHEV you can’t fully charge or discharge it (Golf Mk8 13 kWh total, only 10.9 kWh ever available).

Come home, plug in. Unplug when charged and drive. Simples 👍.
 

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No! You might faff about, as you describe, in an all electric car where you can fully charge and fully discharge the battery. In a PHEV you can’t fully charge or discharge it (Golf Mk8 13 kWh total, only 10.9 kWh ever available).

Come home, plug in. Unplug when charged and drive. Simples 👍.
Regardless of the protective buffer, it is still a fact of Li-Ion battery life that if you limit the peak charge the battery life will be preserved.
At 94% the pack is at 4.15V per cell. The general rule is above 4.00 ~ 4.05V the life of the pack begins to be shortened by transitioning into that higher energy state.
So in general limiting the high charge state will be better. (Very low charge is only a problem at cold temperatures.)
 

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We have been routinely charging to 100% on our 5 year old car.

When the battery condition was checked by VW as part of the recall for early cars it was deemed to be in good condition.

I know it is an imprecise measure (to say the least) but when charged yesterday, the GOM was showing 32 miles.

As others have said, just charge the car!
 
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