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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am excited at the new expansion that Shell Recharge is pushing out at the moment! I am very surprised they have not announced the new expansion that is on-going either! They seem to be using the tritium which also support unto 100kw chadmeo speeds and proved to be very reliable as well!

So far I have found the following:

Shell Saxondale - A46 - 2x 150kw units installed and live!
Shell Markham Moor - A1 NB - 4x 150kw units and live! (This replaced the 50kw unit)
Shell Buckden - A1 SB - 4x 150kw units installed - not live yet
Shell Hayle - A30 - 4x 150kw units installed - not live yet
Shell Penhale A30 - 2x 150kw units installed and live!

I am happy with 0.39p per kWh as no subscription. I have used these units and my Leaf 62 e+ charges around 76kw speeds! This will make the Cornwall summer holiday very easy indeed!

Has anyone else seen any expansion plans?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I do not think 39p per kWh is a big ask. They are installing multi-rapid sites, ultra fast rapids at 150kw speeds. Its higher cost justifies the service of these new units. If you do not like it, try and risk looking for a single 50kw rapid unit somewhere. Just not worth the stress imo!
 

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2018 Nissan Leaf 40kWh Tekna - love it
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Do they/will they take contactless bank cards?
For people who mostly charge at home, reliability and convenience trump price - well for me they do. As long as its not Ionity prices.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Do they/will they take contactless bank cards?
For people who mostly charge at home, reliability and convenience trump price - well for me they do. As long as its not Ionity prices.
Absolutely I agree! Yes they do!
 

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Ioniq 5 Ultimate Long Range RWD in Gravity Gold, Eco & Tech packs
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I am excited at the new expansion that Shell Recharge is pushing out at the moment! I am very surprised they have not announced the new expansion that is on-going either! They seem to be using the tritium which also support unto 100kw chadmeo speeds and proved to be very reliable as well!

So far I have found the following:

Shell Saxondale - A46 - 2x 150kw units installed and live!
Shell Markham Moor - A1 NB - 4x 150kw units and live! (This replaced the 50kw unit)
Shell Buckden - A1 SB - 4x 150kw units installed - not live yet
Shell Hayle - A30 - 4x 150kw units installed - not live yet
Shell Penhale A30 - 2x 150kw units installed and live!

I am happy with 0.39p per kWh as no subscription. I have used these units and my Leaf 62 e+ charges around 76kw speeds! This will make the Cornwall summer holiday very easy indeed!

Has anyone else seen any expansion plans?
I thought that 1 of the Penhale chargers is up and running?
 

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Audi e-tron 50
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This is good news, no question. On the cost... you pay your money and take your choice - and more choice is good.
I've an inefficient e-tron that can charge at nearly 125 kW so these are exactly the things I want when I occasionally go up north.
OK, it's not the best news for those who have efficient cars that can't make the most of the power on offer while having to pay more for the energy than you normally would but even so, it's not that expensive unless you use them often.
For die hard pessimists who are still looking for a silver lining, consider that these will tend to keep my watt-waster off your preferred cheaper 50 kW chargers where I would be sitting blocking them for far longer than you would to accumulate the same amount of range.
 

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At 39p/kW it's not too bad. Obviously if one of them was very close to an Instavolt, you'd go there instead, but I'd certainly use Shell instead of say BP Pulse or Ecotricity. As well as being more likely to be working, I know on a higher powered unit, my car would take on its maximum 50kW rather than the 42kW maximum that Ecotricity pump out, so the time saved on its own would be worth it.
 

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MG ZS EV
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I just wonder how long it will be before price competition becomes a thing. Braintree Gridserve at 24p and prices of around 25p seem realistic to me. The price paid for electricity is going to be about 8/9p kWh so the margin of 10p per kWh before vat is added ought to be enough except in the most out of the way locations. If a charger dispenses 300 kWh a day (in use for 6-8 hours at 50 kw) that is £10k per year which over 7 years should cover the capital, back office and maintenance costs surely? In these early days costs may need to be higher but once the customer base builds up prices should fall.
 

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Thats a bit of wishful thinking. It would be very informative to see the amount of use each "pump" gets in a day (rapids only). There must be some algorithms out there that can determine the optimum number of chargers per site based on current and future predicted EV use. Then from that you could also determine the likely income per charger. The best we might end up with is charging sites on main trunk routes with say 2 to 6 chargers to meet current usage but on sites that can be easily expanded. This is likely to be a strategy that BP, Shell etc would adopt.
Its a bit of a shame really because some of the Instavolts that we like and rely on now might become unprofitable. (if in fact they are now)
 

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Thats a bit of wishful thinking. It would be very informative to see the amount of use each "pump" gets in a day (rapids only). There must be some algorithms out there that can determine the optimum number of chargers per site based on current and future predicted EV use. Then from that you could also determine the likely income per charger. The best we might end up with is charging sites on main trunk routes with say 2 to 6 chargers to meet current usage but on sites that can be easily expanded. This is likely to be a strategy that BP, Shell etc would adopt.
Its a bit of a shame really because some of the Instavolts that we like and rely on now might become unprofitable. (if in fact they are now)
I suspect the future reality will be subtler and more complicated than you suggest but that you're thinking along the right lines.
Companies like Shell and BP ought to have data that inform them well on how we'll charge or cars based on how we currently fuel ICEs. After all, BEVs and ICEs are all just vehicles moving people around using energy. But into that mix they have to consider the balance of how BEV users will charge - home versus public chargers (they probably can infer / predict this based on how many times given ICEs fill up locally versus remotely). That suggests that local rural ICE filling stations will become less profitable because, as we shift towards BEVs, they will be competing against our home chargers.
But then they'll also have to consider the car users who will struggle to have home chargers - typically city dwellers. Here people will be driven away from cars towards public transport, cycling and walking. I guess here they'll try to somehow maintain peoples' car use as best they can because that's how they may make money.
As far as Instavolt goes, I'd hate to see them suffer because right now they are one of my go to options for charging away from home. I like their strategy of putting good chargers a bit away from motorway services around Starbucks and the like so the charging wait is pleasant.
At the end of the day (or at the end of this post, at least), I'm not clever enough to figure out exactly how things will pan out.
And that's before any hydrogen infrastructure develops...
 

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Yes, those without home charging are the proverbial fly in the ointment, but this could and should be mitigated by provision of workplace charging. There seems to be little move towards this at the moment and the NHS, you would think, would be very keen to implement it. The two hospitals near me have two chargers on one site and none at the other.
Charging where people leave their cars while working, like railway stations or town centre car parks are also good alternatives. And, yes, bikes and clean public transport have an important and increasing role.
 

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I do my best to avoid single charger sites where possible - risk of being in use or faulty. I suspect a lot of other people do too. So I hope providers aren't relying too much on how much use they're getting before deciding to increase to 2 or 4!
 

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Yes, those without home charging are the proverbial fly in the ointment, but this could and should be mitigated by provision of workplace charging. There seems to be little move towards this at the moment and the NHS, you would think, would be very keen to implement it. The two hospitals near me have two chargers on one site and none at the other.
Charging where people leave their cars while working, like railway stations or town centre car parks are also good alternatives. And, yes, bikes and clean public transport have an important and increasing role.
Just throwing robotaxis and car sharing into the mix. Most cars spend most of the time parked up doing nothing. If full self driving ever becomes reality, we won’t all need personal vehicles. So the same number of miles would be done, but by less cars. These automated EVs could charge up overnight at their bases, and top up if necessary by rapid charging at dedicated charging hubs not accessible to the public. So less need for reliance on home or public charging.
 

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Just throwing robotaxis and car sharing into the mix. Most cars spend most of the time parked up doing nothing. If full self driving ever becomes reality, we won’t all need personal vehicles. So the same number of miles would be done, but by less cars. These automated EVs could charge up overnight at their bases, and top up if necessary by rapid charging at dedicated charging hubs not accessible to the public. So less need for reliance on home or public charging.
It’s quite possible that the extra miles spent by self driving cars repositioning themselves would cause gridlock. Have you not seen the commotion caused by the Boris Bikes in London being repositioned. It’s not pretty.
 
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