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"No" is the long answer, it only has a setting for the initial regen for each mode.
 

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Re. Drive mode switching - is there a way of making it retain the currently operating regen setting when you change drive mode?

eg. I’ve set the initial regen setting for each drive mode to level 1. I’m driving along in eco mode and have altered the regen setting to level 3 (or 2, or 0). I then change the drive mode to comfort, and the regen setting changes to level 1. I then have to change the regen setting back to level 3 again?
No, when you switch drive mode it will always go to that drive modes default.
 

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'19 BMW i3 120Ah / '20 Hyundai Kona 64kWh
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Discussion Starter #63
Thanks both.

I’m wondering then what is the best initial regen level to set on each drive mode if I want to eliminate as much as much as the 'drive mode switching jerkiness' as possible.

If a high initial regen setting is chosen for each mode then there is deceleration lurch when driving in, for example, normal mode with regen 1 and then switching to eco mode.

If a low initial regen setting is chosen then there will be an acceleration surge when driving in, for example, eco mode with regen 3 and then switching to comfort mode.

It seems it’s a case of trying to choose the least bad option. Or, I suppose, only switiching mode when stationary or when using cruise control.
 

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Or, I suppose, only switiching mode when stationary
The modes are fairly pointless IMO. All they really do is change the throttle mapping, limit the HVAC and make pretty designs on the dash display.

I can change from Eco to Sport by moving my right foot accordingly - light for Eco, lead for sport. Infinitely and instantly variable without even needing to press a button.
I can limit the HVAC by hitting a button or two, or dialling the temp - though with a 64kWh battery it's not something I think I've ever bothered to do.
Fancy dash displays ... meh. I find looking at the road with an occasional glance at the HUD works pretty well.

It's just a car - drive it :)
 

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I'd agree with @mikegs. Each driving mode has a different go-pedal calibration and that's about it. And of course if you change modes on the fly with the pedal depressed it's going to exhibit a little bump.

I think most drivers find a mode they like and leave it there. I use Comfort simply because I want a normal speedometer.
 

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'19 BMW i3 120Ah / '20 Hyundai Kona 64kWh
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Discussion Starter #66
Sport mode changes the steering weighting. I’m fairly sure the steering weighting can’t be changed with the accelerator or brake pedals.

Previous cars of mine haven’t exhibited such pronounced and unrefined bumps when changing drive modes.

I am driving it quite a lot given the current restrictions.... I’m really just trying to work out which of the multiple mode and setting combinations are least bad for the types of driving I do.
 

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Discussion Starter #68
That even a lowly Hyundai might, by now, be able to do the basics well - as well as provide the best range of any EV for the money.

I’ll give it some time. The beauty of Onto is that if I just can’t become accustomed to its foibles then I just give it back and get something else. Glad, on the basis of my current experience, that I haven’t bought one.
 

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This morning I had a 10 mile drive and tried every combination of regen and throttle to try and get a jerky initial acceleration on SCC at speeds from 30mph to 60mph. I failed. Each initial acceleration when engaging the SCC was smooth and seamless. Not sure what I'm doing that others aren't.
 

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This morning I had a 10 mile drive and tried every combination of regen and throttle to try and get a jerky initial acceleration on SCC at speeds from 30mph to 60mph. I failed. Each initial acceleration when engaging the SCC was smooth and seamless. Not sure what I'm doing that others aren't.
I think the jerkiness is related to the difference between the set and current speed. With a considerable difference between the two, the car does jump forward a little too much when SCC is resumed.

You can avoid the jerk with resuming only when the two are close, or use of the go pedal.
 

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I think the jerkiness is related to the difference between the set and current speed.
Not sure about that. The SCC was set at 60mph, the road was clear behind me so I disengaged SCC and slowed to 30mph. When I re-engaged it accelerated smoothly back to 60mph. I tried this with 0 regen and full regen and both times I could detect no jerkiness in the acceleration. Strange.
 

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Not sure about that. The SCC was set at 60mph, the road was clear behind me so I disengaged SCC and slowed to 30mph. When I re-engaged it accelerated smoothly back to 60mph. I tried this with 0 regen and full regen and both times I could detect no jerkiness in the acceleration. Strange.
Need bigger difference? 30 to 70mph? I'm not sure, I can't complain to be honest...
 
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Discussion Starter #74
Mine does it when the gap between current speed and set speed is effectively zero - ie. even when initially setting the cruise, rather than resuming.
  1. Driving ‘manually’ on flat road at 30mph, in eco mode, regen level 3.
  2. Foot on accelerator to maintain 30mph.
  3. Press the set button whilst momentarily keeping foot in the same position.
  4. Then gently release foot from pedal.
  5. Result of these actions is the car feels like it lurches to the rear and then immediately lurches to the front.
  6. Only way to avoid the lurching is to release foot from the pedal at exact moment the set button is pressed.
Perhaps most other people are just subconsciously releasing all pedal pressure at the precise moment they press the set button - because they’re already accustomed to the system, and their muscle memory just takes over. Perhaps I’m currently just in a phase of getting used to the Kona’s system after years in cars that didn’t seem to care if there was some pedal pressure for half a second or so after the set button had been pressed.

Or perhaps there is just something different going on in cars manufactured after a certain date - even if earlier cars have since been updated to the same software versions via recalls and routine updates. Or perhaps there’s a fault or some sort of mis-calibration in my car.

It’s certainly a bit of an odd one - and I really did try yesterday over the course of a 2 hour drive on mixed roads to try multiple approaches and to confirm it wasn’t driver error!...but...if I use cruise control as I have done in every other cruise control equipped car that I’ve driven then it can be quite uncomfortable.

To be clear, the issue doesn’t happen if I have slowed down, do not have my foot on the accelerator pedal, and then press resume. It only happens when there is pressure on the accelerator pedal at the time when set or resume is pressed.
 

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Mine does it when the gap between current speed and set speed is effectively zero - ie. even when initially setting the cruise, rather than resuming.
  1. Driving ‘manually’ on flat road at 30mph, in eco mode, regen level 3.
  2. Foot on accelerator to maintain 30mph.
  3. Press the set button whilst momentarily keeping foot in the same position.
  4. Then gently release foot from pedal.
  5. Result of these actions is the car feels like it lurches to the rear and then immediately lurches to the front.
  6. Only way to avoid the lurching is to release foot from the pedal at exact moment the set button is pressed.
Perhaps most other people are just subconsciously releasing all pedal pressure at the precise moment they press the set button - because they’re already accustomed to the system, and their muscle memory just takes over. Perhaps I’m currently just in a phase of getting used to the Kona’s system after years in cars that didn’t seem to care if there was some pedal pressure for half a second or so after the set button had been pressed.

Or perhaps there is just something different going on in cars manufactured after a certain date - even if earlier cars have since been updated to the same software versions via recalls and routine updates. Or perhaps there’s a fault or some sort of mis-calibration in my car.

It’s certainly a bit of an odd one - and I really did try yesterday over the course of a 2 hour drive on mixed roads to try multiple approaches and to confirm it wasn’t driver error!...but...if I use cruise control as I have done in every other cruise control equipped car that I’ve driven then it can be quite uncomfortable.

To be clear, the issue doesn’t happen if I have slowed down, do not have my foot on the accelerator pedal, and then press resume. It only happens when there is pressure on the accelerator pedal at the time when set or resume is pressed.
May be worth mentioning to tech support at the dealership because that doesn't sound right.
 

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I did some tests yesterday at between 50 and 80 km/h and encountered no unexpected behaviour. And the surging issue when overriding the set speed with the go pedal was no longer present.
 

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Mine does it when the gap between current speed and set speed is effectively zero - ie. even when initially setting the cruise, rather than resuming.
  1. Driving ‘manually’ on flat road at 30mph, in eco mode, regen level 3.
  2. Foot on accelerator to maintain 30mph.
  3. Press the set button whilst momentarily keeping foot in the same position.
  4. Then gently release foot from pedal.
  5. Result of these actions is the car feels like it lurches to the rear and then immediately lurches to the front.
  6. Only way to avoid the lurching is to release foot from the pedal at exact moment the set button is pressed.
Perhaps most other people are just subconsciously releasing all pedal pressure at the precise moment they press the set button - because they’re already accustomed to the system, and their muscle memory just takes over. Perhaps I’m currently just in a phase of getting used to the Kona’s system after years in cars that didn’t seem to care if there was some pedal pressure for half a second or so after the set button had been pressed.

Or perhaps there is just something different going on in cars manufactured after a certain date - even if earlier cars have since been updated to the same software versions via recalls and routine updates. Or perhaps there’s a fault or some sort of mis-calibration in my car.

It’s certainly a bit of an odd one - and I really did try yesterday over the course of a 2 hour drive on mixed roads to try multiple approaches and to confirm it wasn’t driver error!...but...if I use cruise control as I have done in every other cruise control equipped car that I’ve driven then it can be quite uncomfortable.

To be clear, the issue doesn’t happen if I have slowed down, do not have my foot on the accelerator pedal, and then press resume. It only happens when there is pressure on the accelerator pedal at the time when set or resume is pressed.
Ben, The answers are in your post. The SCC doesn't engage in my experience until your foot is released from the pedal. So whether you are going faster or slower and you set the SCC you are still driving not the car. Therefore as you are using the most severe regen level 3 you are gently releasing the pedal you are introdrucing regen 3 slowing until the pedal is fully released. In this case the car slows aggressively until the pedal is released and then starts to build speed to get back to the set speed. I think you are slowly releasing the pedal when the SCC is set, when you are ready for the car to drive step off the pedal quickly. This should prevent the level 3 regen activating and you should get minimal lurching. Let us know how you get on.
 

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Discussion Starter #78 (Edited)
Ben, The answers are in your post. The SCC doesn't engage in my experience until your foot is released from the pedal. So whether you are going faster or slower and you set the SCC you are still driving not the car. Therefore as you are using the most severe regen level 3 you are gently releasing the pedal you are introdrucing regen 3 slowing until the pedal is fully released. In this case the car slows aggressively until the pedal is released and then starts to build speed to get back to the set speed. I think you are slowly releasing the pedal when the SCC is set, when you are ready for the car to drive step off the pedal quickly. This should prevent the level 3 regen activating and you should get minimal lurching. Let us know how you get on.
Thanks - it’s Bill btw - but also, I do already know all of this. As I’ve said earlier in the thread, I know how to avoid the issue.... by removing all pedal pressure at exactly the same moment as I press the set button. The conundrum is surrounding the fact that multiple other people are saying that they are unable to replicate the lurching and surging issue, even if they follow the steps I outlined to deliberately try and invoke it, and I’m saying that in no other car I’ve ever driven has it been necessary to time removal of pedal pressure with such accuracy, or in a specific manner, in order to ensure a smooth drive. In particular, the i3 had strong regen by default and did not behave this this.
 

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Sorry for getting your name wrong Bill.

You don't have to synchronise to release of the pedal and setting the SCC.
Until you release the pedal you are control the car not the SCC. You can set it and continue driving or if you are running on SCC you can depress the pedal to gain more than the set speed for an overtake say. The SCC will wait for you to release the pedal, After several minutes with your foot still on the pedal the SCC will automatically cancel.
You can tell if you are driving or the SCC is driving by the cruise control section on the driver display, if that part of the display is flashing you have your foot on the pedal and you are in control of the speed.
Try this
Once set and you are ready for the car to take over take you foot directly off the pedal not gradually because if you do you are then inducing regen and acceleration which is what you have described
Try this test get a clear road drive at 40mph turn on cruise control by selecting set, keep your foot on the pedal. Increment the speed on SCC to 50mph, foot still on pedal count to 10
I suspect the following will be happening the cruise speed will be flashing on the display you will still be going 40mph, now quickly remove your foot from the pedal, SCC takes over and starts accelerating.
It is the speed that you are taking your foot off the pedal which is causing the slow down when you have L3 regen.
So in conclusion the SCC is temporarily disabled if you have you foot on the pedal whether it is switched on whilst the pedal is depressed or the pedal is depressed whilst SCC is already in operation.

Hope this explanation is clear enough
 

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Discussion Starter #80 (Edited)
Sorry for getting your name wrong Bill.

You don't have to synchronise to release of the pedal and setting the SCC.
Until you release the pedal you are control the car not the SCC. You can set it and continue driving or if you are running on SCC you can depress the pedal to gain more than the set speed for an overtake say. The SCC will wait for you to release the pedal, After several minutes with your foot still on the pedal the SCC will automatically cancel.
You can tell if you are driving or the SCC is driving by the cruise control section on the driver display, if that part of the display is flashing you have your foot on the pedal and you are in control of the speed.
Try this
Once set and you are ready for the car to take over take you foot directly off the pedal not gradually because if you do you are then inducing regen and acceleration which is what you have described
Try this test get a clear road drive at 40mph turn on cruise control by selecting set, keep your foot on the pedal. Increment the speed on SCC to 50mph, foot still on pedal count to 10
I suspect the following will be happening the cruise speed will be flashing on the display you will still be going 40mph, now quickly remove your foot from the pedal, SCC takes over and starts accelerating.
It is the speed that you are taking your foot off the pedal which is causing the slow down when you have L3 regen.
So in conclusion the SCC is temporarily disabled if you have you foot on the pedal whether it is switched on whilst the pedal is depressed or the pedal is depressed whilst SCC is already in operation.

Hope this explanation is clear enough
Thank you very much - that is very clear, and I will try as you’ve suggested (once the roads become clear of snow and ice!).

I will be very pleased if a quick release, even if my foot has been on the pedal for several seconds, reliably does the trick...although, that still wouldn’t be quite like other systems I’ve used where they just ignore pedal pressure once the system is set - unless that pressure is more than equivalent to the automated/simulated pedal position. I do find it odd that setting cruise and then applying light pressure (which would result in a slowing of the car) is not just simply ignored by the system.

I’m also now intrigued to test whether the following would work:
  1. Driving at 30mph with pedal in requisite position.
  2. Press set - SCC target speed defaults to 30mph - but keep foot on pedal to prevent immediate activation of SCC and maintain speed / keep up with traffic flow.
  3. With pedal pressure still applied (and speed controlled by my foot), increase (or decrease) the SCC target speed to the desired level.
  4. Quickly release pedal pressure to ensure smooth handover to SCC.
  5. SCC accelerates (or decelerates) to set target speed.
If this works for setting target speeds which are either higher or lower than the current speed, then it may be a decent workaround to the slight deficiency which I think is caused by the Kona having fewer cruise control buttons than many other systems.
 
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