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I *think* it sounds as though E7 would make sense for us...
I would agree, plus it gives you the option to fill your battery from E7 in the winter when you'll get almost no solar - you should just check that the Duracell battery has that option.

At the risk of stating the obvious or of 'teaching grandma to suck eggs':
1. It sounds like you're using a ton of electricity - do you have an opportunity to cut down in parallel with introducing your solar? For example, tumble dryers can take a stack of electricity; you could be taking all day to fill your battery with solar, then emptying in just an hour or so once you put on the tumbler.
2. Try and get your head around units as it all then starts to make sense. Power is measured in kW, energy in kWh. If you have a Leaf that can store 30kWh, and you charge it with 3kW power, then it will take 10 hours to fill. Your Duracell battery can hold 3kWh; if you use it to run a 1.5kW tumble dryer then it will be empty in 2 hours. kWh is the size of the bath, kW is the speed of the water going in or out.
 

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If you run a tumble dryer that often definitely look into a heat pump tumble dryer. They are *much* more efficient than "ordinary" traditional ones.

Edit: also almost impossible for them to go on fire, unlike traditional ones...
 

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solar works well with E7, as the solar means you dont use too much peak rate power. An E7 tariff generally charges more during the day than a standard one. For instance mine is currently 15p during the day and 8p at night, vs 13p all the time on the normal tariff. With the majority of the car charging at night, that often means its worth the slightly higher day rate to get the much cheaper night rate.

The battery your quoted on seems very small, almost small enough not to be worth it. I would be looking at other systems. Get a quote from Trevor above if you havent already too.
 

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If you are considering the quote from Project Solar, take a look at some of the comments on the MSE forum.

Have solar panel quote, need advice - MoneySavingExpert.com Forums

The general opinion is that the costs are high and include items that are not really required.

The advice is always make sure you get competitive quotes from a number of companies.
 

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Discussion Starter #25
If you are considering the quote from Project Solar, take a look at some of the comments on the MSE forum.

Have solar panel quote, need advice - MoneySavingExpert.com Forums

The general opinion is that the costs are high and include items that are not really required.

The advice is always make sure you get competitive quotes from a number of companies.
Yeah, I have seen those. I don’t know whether the dislike of the company is more the fact that they weren’t the cheapest (often the primary focus for MSE) or that they aren’t the best value in terms of what you actually get. Hard to separate genuine benefits and claims from sales patter at times.
 

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Discussion Starter #26
I would agree, plus it gives you the option to fill your battery from E7 in the winter when you'll get almost no solar - you should just check that the Duracell battery has that option.

At the risk of stating the obvious or of 'teaching grandma to suck eggs':
1. It sounds like you're using a ton of electricity - do you have an opportunity to cut down in parallel with introducing your solar? For example, tumble dryers can take a stack of electricity; you could be taking all day to fill your battery with solar, then emptying in just an hour or so once you put on the tumbler.
2. Try and get your head around units as it all then starts to make sense. Power is measured in kW, energy in kWh. If you have a Leaf that can store 30kWh, and you charge it with 3kW power, then it will take 10 hours to fill. Your Duracell battery can hold 3kWh; if you use it to run a 1.5kW tumble dryer then it will be empty in 2 hours. kWh is the size of the bath, kW is the speed of the water going in or out.
Our usage is fairly standard I thought... 3200kWh per annum for 5 (2 adults; 3 kids including one in reusable nappies - ie extra washing/drying). The car would obv jack that up a lot, but be offset by the lack of diesel costs and road tax.

Btw have just been on the phone to FuelIncluded for a quote so thanks for that.
 

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It sounds like most of you don't live in a busy household. If you have 3 children a tumble dryer is very useful. Our washing machine is on at least once a day, the tumble drier the same, it's a time saver as well as saving space.

If you at doing 20k a year you will save quite a lot on fuel. My wife does similar and our Golf is doing 2000 miles a month. Since the 25th June we have used 1868kWh to charge that from home plus some more a rapids. Probably about 2000 units in 4 months/8000 miles.

You don't need to jump straight into E7 if you use a lot of electricity during the day. You sound like you monitor it already and of you get an app with the solar you'll able to see what you use and at what times. My wife finds it annoying to have to think about when she puts the washing on, she just wants to get the job done and move on to the next load so doesn't appreciate me telling her it's costing twice as much if she uses it during the day! I just do mine at night.
 

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Discussion Starter #28
If you run a tumble dryer that often definitely look into a heat pump tumble dryer. They are *much* more efficient than "ordinary" traditional ones.

Edit: also almost impossible for them to go on fire, unlike traditional ones...
We have a washer-dryer and no spacer for two separate machines... do heat-pump washer dryers exist? Ours is only a couple of years old too and rated A+ for energy but haven’t checked the kw on it.
 

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On E7 you could potentially set the dryer to come on at 6am and fit a smoke alarm where it is located for peace of mind. In the summer a 4kW PV array should generate enough to run it if it is sunny. I would fit the most PV panels you can but only bother if you are planning to stay where you are for 10 years or so, otherwise the next buyer will get the benefits you have paid for.
 

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We have a washer-dryer and no spacer for two separate machines... do heat-pump washer dryers exist? Ours is only a couple of years old too and rated A+ for energy but haven’t checked the kw on it.
AEG certainly had one. Looking on John Lewis there's an A+++ rated Hoover washer dryer, but looking at the specs it looks to me like it's quite efficient for washing (1.2kWh) but not so much for drying (5.4kWh for complete wash/dry cycle).

That does also suggest your small 3kWh battery wouldn't really cut it.

BTW, don't just go with "4kW" of panels - the system will (almost) never generate that. Get a few more panels, so the inverter can get closer to its rated output for more of the time. And/or split panels East/West if you can, to get a better time distribution of generation through the day.
 

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BTW, don't just go with "4kW" of panels - the system will (almost) never generate that. Get a few more panels, so the inverter can get closer to its rated output for more of the time.
Definitely. The inverter is a significant fixed cost: it will cost the same however many panels you have. Likewise, labour, scaffolding, wiring etc. So twice as many panels will cost only, say, 50% more. Get as many as you possibly can.
 

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I’m in the solar industry but don’t know Project Solar. I’m sure they are a reputable company but I have taken a look at their website and I would exercise caution. For example they make a number of claims such as ’welcome to the UK’s leading solar energy provider’, ‘we provide the finest solar panels’, ‘largest and most experienced installers in the UK’. I would doubt all these claims without evidence.

I’ve never heard of evolution max modules but they are certainly not a leading manufacturer. You would be better going with modules from leading Chinese, Korean, Japanese or US brands that manufacture GWs of modules per year, are chosen by leading investors, and have a strong chance of being around in the future to honour their warranties. Also always choose an installer who is happy to provide you with local examples of their prior work or better still seek recommendations from others.
 

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Personally, I would space out any capital expenditure on solar until a year after the BEV purchase. Its amazing how much insight you will get after living with the car over a winter, spring and summer. That gives you time to properly understand your own requirements, get a range of quotes and generally not be rushed. For the car charging, I would keep it simple (KISS).
 

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Yeah, I have seen those. I don’t know whether the dislike of the company is more the fact that they weren’t the cheapest (often the primary focus for MSE) or that they aren’t the best value in terms of what you actually get. Hard to separate genuine benefits and claims from sales patter at times.
The cheapest quote I had for a 4.2kWp (14x300w panels) system was ~£4600, with 10 year inverter warranty. Just FYI..
 

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On E7 you could potentially set the dryer to come on at 6am and fit a smoke alarm where it is located for peace of mind. In the summer a 4kW PV array should generate enough to run it if it is sunny. I would fit the most PV panels you can but only bother if you are planning to stay where you are for 10 years or so, otherwise the next buyer will get the benefits you have paid for.
In summer, a drying line is a much better solution (safer, more hygienic, more environmentally friendly) than any PV powered dryer, so make sure you budget for one of those old tech devices too.

In winter, wind power will achieve the same result.
 

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Discussion Starter #37
Personally, I would space out any capital expenditure on solar until a year after the BEV purchase. Its amazing how much insight you will get after living with the car over a winter, spring and summer. That gives you time to properly understand your own requirements, get a range of quotes and generally not be rushed. For the car charging, I would keep it simple (KISS).
Thanks - the only issue is that the government feed-in tariffs are ending in March 2019, so any additional financial incentive (above general savings on leccy bill) disappears. I definitely want solar at some point, so now seems like the best time to do it.
 

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Discussion Starter #38
In summer, a drying line is a much better solution (safer, more hygienic, more environmentally friendly) than any PV powered dryer, so make sure you budget for one of those old tech devices too.

In winter, wind power will achieve the same result.
Agreed. In the summer, we never run the dryer (unless there's a nappy-based emergency happening and even then, the magical bleaching power of the sun still wins out ;) ) and I want to rig up an undercover line to make use of outside drying in rainy weather to reduce need for tumble drying further.
 

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Thanks - the only issue is that the government feed-in tariffs are ending in March 2019, so any additional financial incentive (above general savings on leccy bill) disappears. I definitely want solar at some point, so now seems like the best time to do it.
You can always nail the solar in now, and do the battery later. The battery doesnt count towards the feed in tariff.
 
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