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Discussion Starter #1
Hi,

I'm looking at a 2015 27kWh Soul, I've noticed that it had 3 x new tyres (Joyroad HP RX3 -budget tyre?) But they other the is still a Nexen on the offside front. My question is, are only specific types classed as 'Low rolling resistance' and how much affect would fitting these make in terms of miles per kWh and range, anyone had any experience with this?

I've seen people recommend various brands and models, Michelin, Pirelli etc but are these specifically low rolling resistance?

If I get the car is it worth matching the tyres up and replacing the Nexen with another Joyroad or would it be best to wait and replace the fronts with a more efficient tyre if performance isn't going to be that much of an improvement?

Any recommendations for tyres on this car would be appreciated

Cheers
 

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Makes a massive difference. Modern Low rolling resistance tyres can add noticeable mileage to range.
 

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Those tyres, which have an E rating, are around 7.5% worse in terms of energy efficiency than those with an A rating. They also have a C rating for wet grip. My advice is get rid of them ASAP, treat yourself to a better set and if they have any tread left flog them.
 

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Personally, I would replace with a decent set of tyres. We've just replaced the original Nexens with Goodyear Vector 4 Seasons (Gen 3) and the difference in grip/handling is significant. These are rated C for efficiency but we've noticed little to no difference in range... I reckon the aerodynamic losses with the Soul far outweigh any additional rolling resistance that tyres might add?

My advice would be to get a quality set of tyres that meet your needs (local climate etc.). 'A' rated tyres = less grip in poor conditions. Range shouldn't be your primary consideration, in my opinion.
 

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Hi,

I'm looking at a 2015 27kWh Soul, I've noticed that it had 3 x new tyres (Joyroad HP RX3 -budget tyre?) But they other the is still a Nexen on the offside front. My question is, are only specific types classed as 'Low rolling resistance' and how much affect would fitting these make in terms of miles per kWh and range, anyone had any experience with this?

I've seen people recommend various brands and models, Michelin, Pirelli etc but are these specifically low rolling resistance?

If I get the car is it worth matching the tyres up and replacing the Nexen with another Joyroad or would it be best to wait and replace the fronts with a more efficient tyre if performance isn't going to be that much of an improvement?

Any recommendations for tyres on this car would be appreciated

Cheers
The Joyride is likely to be a cheap tyre. Poor life, grip or rolling resistance
 

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I would suggest looking to see how much life there is on the other front tyre. Providing the nexen has plenty of tread left, drive the car sensibly and then replace both fronts at the same time with a modern, affordable tyre within your budget. Despite the adverts, there are no lap records to be had and the world is suffering from "early discarded" tyres that energy has been spent already creating. Ideally tyres should match, in the real world they should be perfectly safe.
 

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Discussion Starter #8
I would suggest looking to see how much life there is on the other front tyre. Providing the nexen has plenty of tread left, drive the car sensibly and then replace both fronts at the same time with a modern, affordable tyre within your budget. Despite the adverts, there are no lap records to be had and the world is suffering from "early discarded" tyres that energy has been spent already creating. Ideally tyres should match, in the real world they should be perfectly safe.
Good advice and that's what I was thinking of doing, from when I checked I think the Nexen had less left than the Joy road, probably about 4-5mm. I'll probably use them through the winter and look at replacing both fronts with a 'A' rated tyre. Just got to decide which are best for this car..
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Those tyres, which have an E rating, are around 7.5% worse in terms of energy efficiency than those with an A rating. They also have a C rating for wet grip. My advice is get rid of them ASAP, treat yourself to a better set and if they have any tread left flog them.
Think that's the best bet, I'll look at matching up the front tyres with a new set once I get the car, probably after winter. Where did you get the info from about this tyre btw?
 

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Based on Google and an approximation of your tyre size to find the tyre label, normally there's little between sizes for one brand:
Welcome to the Blackcircles.com Help & Support Centre
There's 9% difference in efficiency from A to G, so about 7% A to E.
I'd strongly advise against your plan. There's an (un)healthy market in 2nd hand tyres and they are generally less safe when worn, particularly in the wet. I'd recommend at least having matching fronts so if you can afford it change them, if not at least swap front to rear.
 

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I swapped all 4 of my tyres from the standard fit Michelin energy savers to cross climates. I can’t say there has been a massive difference in efficiency, had the cross climates on for nearly a year and still averaging 4.8/4.9.

The car is so cheap to charge and run, the safety of all season tyres was worth any range offset.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Based on Google and an approximation of your tyre size to find the tyre label, normally there's little between sizes for one brand:
Welcome to the Blackcircles.com Help & Support Centre
There's 9% difference in efficiency from A to G, so about 7% A to E.
I'd strongly advise against your plan. There's an (un)healthy market in 2nd hand tyres and they are generally less safe when worn, particularly in the wet. I'd recommend at least having matching fronts so if you can afford it change them, if not at least swap front to rear.
I'll probably ask the dealer if he can swap the tyres front to back when I get the car then, then look to replace the odd rear pair for a decent set, but have them put on the front(!?!) haha... Do people 'actually' buy odd second hand tyres.... can't imagine a single £45 part worn tyre would be worth much, I've always just left them with the tyre fitters in the past.
 

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I'll probably ask the dealer if he can swap the tyres front to back when I get the car then, then look to replace the odd rear pair for a decent set, but have them put on the front(!?!) haha... Do people 'actually' buy odd second hand tyres.... can't imagine a single £45 part worn tyre would be worth much, I've always just left them with the tyre fitters in the past.
Yes, as you suggested for a cheap MoT pass or a puncture replacement avoiding two new tyres or mismatched depths.
 

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I have the 2020 Soul, so obviously a much increased range in the first place, but I swapped off the Nexens before I even took delivery as they are terrible tyres. Now got Goodyear Efficient Grip P2's all round.

I suspect that there is a slight hit in terms of rolling resistance and therefore efficiency but "fuelling" the car is so cheap, I couldn't care less if it knocks 10 or even 20 miles off the range. It's far more important to me that I can feel confident driving around in the winter and frankly, I didn't feel that I would be confident if I had the Nexens, and that one wrong move would result in a trip to a local ditch. The GY's are night and day better than the Nexens - I can feel the difference, they feel stuck to the road.

I would hate to think I had odd tyres on the front with different tread patterns and levels of wear. Its asking for trouble if you ask me. Just not worth it. Don't go into the winter months with that setup.
 

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Discussion Starter #16
I have the 2020 Soul, so obviously a much increased range in the first place, but I swapped off the Nexens before I even took delivery as they are terrible tyres. Now got Goodyear Efficient Grip P2's all round.

I suspect that there is a slight hit in terms of rolling resistance and therefore efficiency but "fuelling" the car is so cheap, I couldn't care less if it knocks 10 or even 20 miles off the range. It's far more important to me that I can feel confident driving around in the winter and frankly, I didn't feel that I would be confident if I had the Nexens, and that one wrong move would result in a trip to a local ditch. The GY's are night and day better than the Nexens - I can feel the difference, they feel stuck to the road.

I would hate to think I had odd tyres on the front with different tread patterns and levels of wear. Its asking for trouble if you ask me. Just not worth it. Don't go into the winter months with that setup.
Yeah, definitely going to ask for them to be rotated so the matched pair are at the front and then swap them to another matched pair ASAP...
 

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Sputnik sounds a sensible chap looking for peace of mind. Beyond this thread, at the absolute level this is all good advice however, sensible drivers aren't driving at 9/10ths+ of the limit. The law holds that it's a legal requirement to ensure that tyres of different construction types are not fitted to opposite sides of the same axle, the two main tyre types are radial and cross-ply, and these must not be mixed on the same axle (easily googled). Anything about mixing brand and tyre pattern are marketing to encourage purchases and could result in unneeded expense and a waste of perfectly good tyres. Think tyre size, tread depth and load ratings first. Oh and tyre pressures.
 

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Discussion Starter #19
Sputnik sounds a sensible chap looking for peace of mind. Beyond this thread, at the absolute level this is all good advice however, sensible drivers aren't driving at 9/10ths+ of the limit. The law holds that it's a legal requirement to ensure that tyres of different construction types are not fitted to opposite sides of the same axle, the two main tyre types are radial and cross-ply, and these must not be mixed on the same axle (easily googled). Anything about mixing brand and tyre pattern are marketing to encourage purchases and could result in unneeded expense and a waste of perfectly good tyres. Think tyre size, tread depth and load ratings first. Oh and tyre pressures.
Surely if it's a legal requirement then a car with non matched tyres (on front or back) wouldn't pass an MOT?
 

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The matching only has to be of the construction type - crossply or radial. 99% of car tyres sold today are radial.
 
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