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Kona PremSe64k 2020+bluelink +ohme
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Discussion Starter #1
Okay i am a newbie at this. So please forgive me. After two days of differing results I want to know the exact steps to ensure charging happens at home. I have searched high and low for a step-by-step process to ensure charging happens, and come short. So here are the steps for my kona so far.

I apologise if you think this is all stupid, wrong. As I say I am a newbie.

I am not talking about public vs private charging, just the practical steps to get my car charging everytime.

1. Ensure engine is off and car is in park mode.
2. Lock/Close & open driver's door.
3. Open charging door by pushing on top corner. If icy you may need to remove some ice.
4. If wet remove droplets with kitchen roll first so any water does not enter the charging holes.
5. If using a non-tethered cable connect end to mains power supply first
6. Ensure both ends go in firm.
7. If using Hyundai scheduled charging then charging won't start until the scheduled charging session starts
8. if using charging cable (eg Ohme) schedule then, again charging won't charge until this system activates/permits it to charge.
9. Otherwise charging handshake happens and charging starts or is readied to start
10. The first sign is a click of the two charging ends locking into position. (Just one end if tethered.)
11. Then you should see lights begin to change inside the Kona charging door as the handshake takes place.
12. Also inside the Kona...
13. Switch on the engine and in the main dashboard there should be a red/orange cable S-shape showing a charging cable is connected.
14. On the right of the dashboard it should report charging status information.

What can go wrong?
A. Duff cable (connectors broken)
B. Wet cable connectors
C. Too cold to charge.
D. Scheduled charging (either Hyundai or system at other end of cable preventing charging at this time.) issues.
E. Connectors not pushed home fully.
F. T'other end not supplying electricity.
 

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Well....that’s a lot of steps!
11k miles in here. At home we
1. unlock car
2. press charger-door to open (not had any “frozen” moments as yet).
3. Unclip our tethered cable from it’s “port” on our Zappi2 chargepoint, unloop 2 loops, plug it in.
Light turns green, Kona charges!
If we have arrived at home and want to charge (more normal!), we:
1. stop the car, then go to step 2 above

Never worried about anything else. If the door doesn’t open, unlock the car again!

hth
 

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Plug in and walk away. For AC charging additionally:
  • If scheduled charging is set and it's outside the time range press the button for a second.
  • If you use your own Type 2 cable make sure Auto Lock is off if you want it secured.
 

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2020 Hyundai Kona Premium SE 64kWh, Ceramic Blue
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No, not unreliable, Andy is a new owner who wants to clarify every little detail to make sure he is not caught out.

Personally, I just check that the Kona socket is green (not easy in bright sunlight) and that one of the three green lights is flashing.

Will be charging mine from home solar panels in a couple of hours. A zero fuel cost option.
Well, I like to think that but the panels cost £8k to install, so it'll be a few years before it's really zero, but it feels good to think it, and then there is the planet thing too.
 

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2020 Hyundai Kona Premium SE 64kWh, Ceramic Blue
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One more step Andy, after a few minutes use Bluelink app to check car charging status, remember battery charge % and check again 15 minutes later to make sure % is climbing.

Oh, and check maximum charge limit set in car for type of charging in use. 80%, 100%, etc.
 
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Will be charging mine from home solar panels in a couple of hours. A zero fuel cost option.
Well, I like to think that but the panels cost £8k to install, so it'll be a few years before it's really zero, but it feels good to think it, and then there is the planet thing too.
Got mine charging on solar at the moment, (I've built a solar switch into an extension cable for the "granny charger") Today is going to be a good day for charging and should be able to get into the high 90's %.

I don't really think about the pay back on the panels as I used a PPI repayment to pay off the loan. However, if you are charging your car on the excess, reducing your grid usage and getting the feed in tariff, it won't be long.
 

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Kona PremSe64k 2020+bluelink +ohme
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Discussion Starter #10
The charging pattern I think I want is to ensure the car has a minimum charge, say typically a range of 50 miles. After that then I am happy to use my Ohme to get the cheapest charge possible, up to say 80%.

Actually in these early learning days I am happy to charge up to 100% but in practice I only want that when going on a long journey - typically on Tuesdays.

I have decided to ditch Bluelink scheduled charging as obsolete for my needs and let the Ohme take the strain, because that's what the Ohme is good at and what it is for... I think some of my early problems were caused by exploring the Bluelink/In-car charging schedule.
 

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2020 Hyundai Kona Premium SE 64kWh, Ceramic Blue
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Hi Andy, what I meant was that however your car is charging you can use Bluelink to check on its progress remotely as the status shows firstly whether it is charging or not and secondly the percent charged / range.

I have read somewhere that it is good to give the battery 100% once a month, but otherwise ideally charge to 80% when it gets to 20%.
 

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Kona 64
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As one of the old timers with no bluelink (Sept 2018 car) I agree with your comments. I only charge to 100% once a month unless going on a long journey or spotting the opportunity of a free charge. Otherwise I charge to 80% or as we come into summer whatever I can get from the solar PV.
Likewise I am not phased when I am down to 50 miles. I did once go down to 2 miles range after a long trip and will not be repeating that one.
 

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I charge to 90 at home. The 80 figure really hails from the decline in rate on a rapid charger when you get to that sort of level.
I generally try and stop my phone and tablet charging once they are in the 90s.
 

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Had to go to Tesco this am to do some shopping for an old person. It was a bit busy so rather than take up a normal space I parked in the charging area and plugged into the podpoint, just to be legal. It started charging but I don't have the app so knew it would terminate after 15 mins - no worries.

When I got back and started up I got a warning on the dash about charging having stopped and to check the AC charger - eh? It went away in due course but then the same message popped up on the central display. It all seemed a bit excessive - is it normal?
(No I've never had an AC charge terminated by the feed end before; always been from the car.)
 

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Kona 64
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Had to go to Tesco this am to do some shopping for an old person. It was a bit busy so rather than take up a normal space I parked in the charging area and plugged into the podpoint, just to be legal. It started charging but I don't have the app so knew it would terminate after 15 mins - no worries.

When I got back and started up I got a warning on the dash about charging having stopped and to check the AC charger - eh? It went away in due course but then the same message popped up on the central display. It all seemed a bit excessive - is it normal?
(No I've never had an AC charge terminated by the feed end before; always been from the car.)
Yes, its normal if you do not terminate in the approved way. But its only a warning and so can be ignored if you know why it happened - unless of course you have not unplugged deliberately.
 
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