Speak EV - Electric Car Forums banner

1 - 19 of 19 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,155 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I've mentioned a few times that I don't bother much with Eco or B mode, prefering to drive normally, and I still see plenty of regen, and make it home every day with plenty of spare from my 67 mile round-trip commute.

However, yesterday morning I had to take my wife to work and that meant a longer journey for me. Typically, I arrive at work, after ~33 miles, having used about 40% (give or take a % or 2). Because of the longer journey, I arrive having used 53% - so 47% remaining.

Although 47% should be enough to get me home, it didn't leave me much leeway to deal with any (unlikely, but possible) road closures or diversions, so I decided to use Eco. I then drove as normally as possible, keeping up with traffic, not holding anybody up, and turning off Eco a couple of times just to get out of tricky/busy junctions. The journey was pretty typical - not too fast, not too slow - and the temperature was up in the high teens.

To my surprise, I made it home with 17% remaining - meaning I'd used only 30% instead of my usual 40%

This morning required another 'wife to work' trip. I decided to try this in Eco too. Again, I drove normally, actually arrived earlier by about 10 minutes, and arrived with 59% remaining - an improvement of 12% on yesterday morning's identical journey.

I honestly don't know what has changed. I don't feel that I'm driving differently, I wasn't *trying* to get the best economy possible, it just happened.

So now I'm going to have to change my stock answer to "Does Eco mode make a difference?". Instead of "not really", I'll have to answer "sometimes, but when it does, it can be quite significant."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
This absolutely fits my experience! 1% per mile in these current temps. Get a lot less when driving 70 on motorway


I've mentioned a few times that I don't bother much with Eco or B mode, prefering to drive normally, and I still see plenty of regen, and make it home every day with plenty of spare from my 67 mile round-trip commute.

However, yesterday morning I had to take my wife to work and that meant a longer journey for me. Typically, I arrive at work, after ~33 miles, having used about 40% (give or take a % or 2). Because of the longer journey, I arrive having used 53% - so 47% remaining.

Although 47% should be enough to get me home, it didn't leave me much leeway to deal with any (unlikely, but possible) road closures or diversions, so I decided to use Eco. I then drove as normally as possible, keeping up with traffic, not holding anybody up, and turning off Eco a couple of times just to get out of tricky/busy junctions. The journey was pretty typical - not too fast, not too slow - and the temperature was up in the high teens.

To my surprise, I made it home with 17% remaining - meaning I'd used only 30% instead of my usual 40%

This morning required another 'wife to work' trip. I decided to try this in Eco too. Again, I drove normally, actually arrived earlier by about 10 minutes, and arrived with 59% remaining - an improvement of 12% on yesterday morning's identical journey.

I honestly don't know what has changed. I don't feel that I'm driving differently, I wasn't *trying* to get the best economy possible, it just happened.

So now I'm going to have to change my stock answer to "Does Eco mode make a difference?". Instead of "not really", I'll have to answer "sometimes, but when it does, it can be quite significant."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
137 Posts
I honestly don't know what has changed.
Nothing's changed. After >3 years driving a Leaf, I can tell you the Gid meter & BMS need to experience the Very Low Battery Warning (VLBW) situation with low cell voltages occasionally as well as the 100% SOC situation with high cell voltages in order for the Guess-O-Meter to have a better calibration of where it's at when close to zero!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
Nothing's changed. After >3 years driving a Leaf, I can tell you the Gid meter & BMS need to experience the Very Low Battery Warning (VLBW) situation with low cell voltages occasionally as well as the 100% SOC situation with high cell voltages in order for the Guess-O-Meter to have a better calibration of where it's at when close to zero!
Think Flipper was talking about the percentage guide you have on the gen 2 leaf. While still not linear fully...goes down more quickly in the 70's of per cent but more slowly in the 50's - is relatively accurate
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
I was looking for Eco mode threads - was going to ask if i was missing something and why anyone wouldn't use Eco mode if it puts more charge into the battery as I don't understand why you wouldn't?

I get if you have a full charge and are going 12 miles max it doesn't make any difference in terms of whether you need to, but even so, why wouldn't you?

This is a genuine question, not a rhetorical one!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
I am with you in temperament on this Neal! But I think other drivers value the performance more - and you do get dramatically quicker response in drive without eco.

That said, sometimes I use both. For instance on motorway I may use drive in case I need to get out of trouble quick. But if I see traffic slowing flick to
eco to regen more / engine brake
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
661 Posts
I think the differences in energy use in eco mode come from usage of the brakes. i.e not using them.
When I'm in eco mode I try to avoid pressing the brake pedal at all (not always possible).
Every time you engage the brakes the energy is shared between regenerating the motor and the disk brakes.
Any use of the disks equates to energy loss.
I'm pretty sure this is where most of the energy saving comes from.
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,507 Posts
I was looking for Eco mode threads - was going to ask if i was missing something and why anyone wouldn't use Eco mode if it puts more charge into the battery as I don't understand why you wouldn't?

I get if you have a full charge and are going 12 miles max it doesn't make any difference in terms of whether you need to, but even so, why wouldn't you?

This is a genuine question, not a rhetorical one!
I have to push the pedal harder to get the same acceleration and the heating is not as powerful and coasting needs you to push the pedal harder. I only use eco if I'm trying to go 60 miles or more on a charge.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
156 Posts
Oh, really? Affecting systems other than power / motor never occurred to me....!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
Didn't know that Edd. Interesting.

Might be worth putting in eco if you arewaiting in the car for it to charge at 7kw on a cold day....heating seems to slow the rate of charge!
 

·
Super Moderator
Joined
·
7,507 Posts
Didn't know that Edd. Interesting.

Might be worth putting in eco if you arewaiting in the car for it to charge at 7kw on a cold day....heating seems to slow the rate of charge!
You can't on a Gen1! The gear lever puts you in D and then put it in D again for ECO. That means when you're in P you can't be in ECO!
 

·
Are Friends Electric? - You Tube
Joined
·
41 Posts
There's no sudden increase of power available, its just that the power you do have is used in a more economical way.

As far as I understand, if you switch across to show percentage on the dash and turn Eco on, the result is more apparent miles, but no more power, it is just provided a little more sparingly when you push your foot on the accelerator. I think the way the car distributes and uses power is moderated more than when it is turned off.

Braking certainly feeds re-useable power into somewhere which then gives it you back as you ask for power again, until its used up, then you get power from your batteries again I think.

I did read somewhere recently that it is better for your batteries longevity to not drive too carefully, so is using Eco too much bad for the batteries or just not as good as not using Eco?

IPete2.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,397 Posts
W
There's no sudden increase of power available, its just that the power you do have is used in a more economical way.

As far as I understand, if you switch across to show percentage on the dash and turn Eco on, the result is more apparent miles, but no more power, it is just provided a little more sparingly when you push your foot on the accelerator. I think the way the car distributes and uses power is moderated more than when it is turned off.

Braking certainly feeds re-useable power into somewhere which then gives it you back as you ask for power again, until its used up, then you get power from your batteries again I think.

I did read somewhere recently that it is better for your batteries longevity to not drive too carefully, so is using Eco too much bad for the batteries or just not as good as not using Eco?

IPete2.
Will let you know Pete! I use my batteries very sparingly! At 29,000 so far. Much is still not known, but my nicads in my berlingo exceeded the expected lifetime at 96,000 with little range reduction. Think the danger that is known follows from heat - so leaving the battery fully charged too long and too often is not good.
 

·
Fleet Sales B2B
Joined
·
310 Posts
Hey guys,

Just thought I'd weight in on this discussion. Another key feature of Eco mode relates to the heating and climate control system. When driving in Eco, less power is used in heating and climate control roughly added 10% more range potential to your current battery charge.

With this in mind you can see how driving around in D mode without Eco on, using the climate control or heating will have a noticeable effect on your range potential.

Thanks all
 
1 - 19 of 19 Posts
Top