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Discussion Starter #1
well, if there was a competition for being absolutely useless, I would have a cabinet full of trophies !

the sump bolt was very tight, honest, and with age the metal has started a transition from metal into clearly a much softer material similar to chocolate. the bolt head is now considerably more round than it was half an hour ago, and the car will be seeing the mechanic to get this bolt out, I've no doubt he'll have no problems doing that, just as soon as he's finished laughing at me.

so, I seem to remember this is the engine often found in the Corsa, is the sump bolt completely standard, such that he'll have one in a drawer somewhere, or should I be attempting to get hold of one ?

if I need to order or collect one from somewhere, will a general car parts shop stock them, or is it a special order from Vauxhall ?

I should know this by now, I'm ashamed to admit that it's not the first nut/bolt I've destroyed..... and to make matters worse, I was being extremely careful too !

many thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
you've lost me there sorry, I'm dropping the oil

(just googled it, apparently you can suck the oil out the top, whatever you need for that, I don't have, so was attempting to use gravity)

..... if garages typically use this vacuum extraction method, that might explain why the sump bolt seemed to be almost welded on ! ...... and the car has seen 145,000 miles too
 

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Ampera aka IGOR
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Different to the Corsa which has a hex socket on it. Here is the part on eBay, you might need the wee rubber o ring as well. Since you have it removed you might as well change it, they are meant to be changed at every oil change.
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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It's been F-'d by the last service.

It is a steel plug into an aluminium sump.

You should have taken it straight back to the last service and accused them of doing that, because you might need a new sump now.

It is even cast onto the sump so the feck-wits don't overtighten it. 16Nm (or less on the later cars, IIRC). Virtually finger tight.

I have posted on this before and offered copious warnings more than once.

I used to ask the tech beforehand to put down the calibration date of the torque wrench he used on my car, just as a 'reminder' of its importance not to overtighten.

If the plug is still out, I recommend to call the last servicing garage before attempting to do anything else, You'll have torn the thread out of the sump in all likelihood. Aluminium sumps don't 'do' heavy tightening, nor untightening.

If you did it yourself, then get ready for a massive bill. The chance of the Al thread surviving, if you've actually managed to damage a steel nut head in the process, is basically zero.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
well, I can only tell you that it was SUPER SUPER tight, it looked very dry, there's no way it was previously tightened lightly.

I'm currently soaking it with WD40, and I'm pretty sure my mechanic will be able to get it out.... hopefully anyway.

Donald.... yes, it was me that slightly mangled the bolt head itself, but I reckon the mechanic will get this either with a removal tool, hammering another socket on, or with some creative filing.

If we don't easily get the bolt out, I guess we'll use that 'suck it up method' for the oil and worry about the bolt another time ;)

I wish I could achieve something without instantly ruining it ! I'm so annoyed :(
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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Oh, it's not even out yet? pfffttt ... new sump then.

If it is not leaking oil then leave it well alone. Sell the car, or save up for a sump replacement first if you really want to keep it.

Or, as suggested, buy a vacuum suction thing and just use that for the rest of the car's life. I used to use one on the Subaru for many years, avoided fiddling around with the under-tray. Perfectly reasonable way to do the job these days.

Seriously, do NOT get anyone to try to take that out now. I offer this as a friendly warning.
 

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I'm not crazy, the attack has begun.
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You are at liberty to do as you wish, but it should spin off with ease. I can't see how it could possibly round off before unscrewing. That's a perfectly viable nut to get off with a small pair of Stilsons, they should barely scratch the nut for all the torque that should be on it, and likewise can be used to put it back on, the torque requirement is so low.

You didn't turn it the wrong way, did you, and tighten it instead with a big torque? Lying upside down does that sometimes. If I am ever lying upside down I always hold my ratchet in my hand first and pretend to tighten or loosen, it's quite easy to get confused which way to push or pull a wrench handle when inverted.

Get a vacuum extractor. You don't get many chances in life at a second chance, you might have been lucky in not getting it off.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
ok, thank you, I'll just get the advice of the mechanic, he's a good guy, I would imagine he'll have an extractor, so probably he can do it that way. thank you for the advice, it's going in on Thursday, so I'll let you know how I get on :)
 

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Discussion Starter #13
the way I initially did the damage after realising how tight it was, was that I put a correct fitting socket on the bolt, and being obviously fully sure I was attempting to remove and not further tighten it..... I used a two foot long torque wrench ! ..... the bolt didn't move at all, just the socket round the bolt moved ! lol

oh well
 

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the way I initially did the damage after realising how tight it was, was that I put a correct fitting socket on the bolt, and being obviously fully sure I was attempting to remove and not further tighten it..... I used a two foot long torque wrench ! ..... the bolt didn't move at all, just the socket round the bolt moved ! lol

oh well
After reading that, and based on what @donald says, it's clear that it will not come out without removing the threads. Given the mileage on the car, I'd agree with the advice to use a suction remover (they come up at Lidl on a regular basis for £15 or eBay similarly) and just change the oil more regularly (they don't get it all out) which will cost a lot less than messing around with the sump.
Without having done it I don't understand why a new sump would be needed rather than using a helicoil type insert, but leaving well alone sounds best.
 

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A Pela suction extractor will do the job. Obviously the engine and oil had to be hot, but no different than when doing it by gravity.

Most new engines are specifically designed to be serviced via vacuum.
 

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I really wouldn't attempt to get that out. If you must try, give it some hot-air-gun heat & try to get as hot as poss; the aluminium expands more than steel, so just might expand away from the steel plug.

If you really, really want to be able to drain it manually from the bottom, I personally would carefully drill a 5mm hole through the middle of the plug, tap it with M6 thread, and use s standard high-tensile button-head screw + copper washer to make up a replacement mini-plug. And be prepared to wait about an hour to actually drain the oil...
 

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And where exactly will all the swarf generated go? I'd not risk there being none in the sump or rely on the filter to remove it.
 
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