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Has this idea ever been kicked around by EV developers? It would essentially do away with the range anxiety for consumers because by being able to simply take out the dead/dying battery and plugging in the juiced up one, there is no charging time required. It would be like fueling up. Or like changing out your propane gas tank.

I'm not that familiar with setups for EVs. I'm assuming the batteries are large and heavy. Perhaps there's a way to engineer them so that only a certain part of the battery would need to be switched out.
 

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Yes Tesla and other demonstrated systems to swap an entire pack and I believe Fiat were posting info about a modular battery for the Centovent I think so you added a range extending battery pack if required.

Makes sense with large slow charging battery packs but as they get more energy dense plus faster to charge I don't think it'll ever get wide usage in passenger cars.
 

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Yes Tesla and other demonstrated systems to swap an entire pack and I believe Fiat were posting info about a modular battery for the Centovent I think so you added a range extending battery pack if required.

Makes sense with large slow charging battery packs but as they get more energy dense plus faster to charge I don't think it'll ever get wide usage in passenger cars.
I don't think the speed of a charge will ever reach the level of a gas station refuel. While it's not a deal breaking barrier for me, I do think it is for a lot of potential consumers. There still is range anxiety. If I'm planning a family vacation, having to account for needing to stop every 100+ miles for an hour is not done lightly. Especially if you have infants, special needs, elderly, etc. The convenience and safety of being able to 'refuel' anywhere, anytime, within a couple minutes is most definitely an issue EV manufactures have dealt with and will need to continue to improve on and address.
 

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Has this idea ever been kicked around by EV developers?
Yes, there have been a number of trials and all have failed. Too capital intensive and there is no way to have a standard battery pack to fit in different shaped cars. And, for the following reasons, it is clear that there will be (is) no need.
100+ miles for an hour is not done lightly
The slowest DC rapid chargers are 50kW right now. At 4 miles/kWh that is 200 miles added for each hour of charging - so 100 miles in half an hour. But 100 kWh and higher chargers are being installed, which give 100 miles in 15 minutes. In practice, those speeds are fast enough, especially as anyone with a home (or office) charger sets off with full range anyway. Most of us find that there is less need to charge on a journey than we expected.
 

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If I'm planning a family vacation, having to account for needing to stop every 100+ miles for an hour is not done lightly. Especially if you have infants, special needs, elderly, etc.
When you have anything over 150 kW charging and a battery that will take you 200 miles between stops (which is around three hours of driving), charging for 30-40 minutes works well with a planned rest stop.

At least that is my experience.
 

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If I'm planning a family vacation, having to account for needing to stop every 100+ miles for an hour is not done lightly.
Most new EVs have 200 mile range or more. New cars with under 150 miles are marketed as city cars.
Recharging usually doesn't take an hour.


With family in the car, stopping every 3-4 hours isn't a bad idea.


Ford Mustang Mach-e 260 to 370 miles.
Tesla Model 3 250 to 320 miles
 

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As has been said, the charging speed that is achievable in the latest generation of electric cars is probably getting to an acceptable level.

The issue is not the speed of charging, but the current availability and accessibility of public chargers.
 

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Has this idea ever been kicked around by EV developers? It would essentially do away with the range anxiety
Tesla and Renault both had battery swap cars and swap stations. Both were commercial failures. Tesla super chargers turned out to be the right solution.
 

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The issue is not the speed of charging, but the current availability and accessibility of public chargers.
Yes. We still don't have rapid chargers covering mid and west Wales. The new single Polar rapid charger at the Royal Oak Hotel in Betws-y-Coed which both helps and points to the heart of the problem. A single rapid at a hotel is going to be in use or blocked.





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Has this idea ever been kicked around by EV developers? It would essentially do away with the range anxiety for consumers because by being able to simply take out the dead/dying battery and plugging in the juiced up one, there is no charging time required. It would be like fueling up. Or like changing out your propane gas tank.

I'm not that familiar with setups for EVs. I'm assuming the batteries are large and heavy. Perhaps there's a way to engineer them so that only a certain part of the battery would need to be switched out.
Yes, my Renault Fluence has a removeable battery. Sadly the company making the swap stations went bust before any were built in the UK.

 

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I don't think the speed of a charge will ever reach the level of a gas station refuel. While it's not a deal breaking barrier for me, I do think it is for a lot of potential consumers. There still is range anxiety. If I'm planning a family vacation, having to account for needing to stop every 100+ miles for an hour is not done lightly. Especially if you have infants, special needs, elderly, etc. The convenience and safety of being able to 'refuel' anywhere, anytime, within a couple minutes is most definitely an issue EV manufactures have dealt with and will need to continue to improve on and address.
Yes, I personally am of that view. I am unlikely to buy or hire a BEV until the real range is 350 miles, which would mean 210 miles from 20% charge to 80% charge. I am pretty sure it will come sometime in the next 5-10 years when the battery technology develops.
 

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Yes, I personally am of that view. I am unlikely to buy or hire a BEV until the real range is 350 miles, which would mean 210 miles from 20% charge to 80% charge. I am pretty sure it will come sometime in the next 5-10 years when the battery technology develops.
You can make a small contribution to air quality improvement, co2 reduction etc by purchasing new or leading new NOW. Does that interest you at all?

Appealing to your more selfish interests, do you realise BEVs are better to drive, more convenient to own. Are you prepared to deny yourself these benefits for a long time?
 

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Even on a 1,000 mile road trip I'd never need that amount of range.
I do know a few people in the US who think nothing of driving more or less non-stop for 8+ hours at a time (and I've done 600mi in a day with nothing more than a pee stop in the past on occasions too). It's rare that people want to do this, but they do occasionally. Having to stop three or four times for an extra 40 minutes each time would not be welcome in this context. But then, choice is great. Perhaps those people need to keep buying dinojuice cars, which they're then not allowed to drive past schools or into city centres?
 
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