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Hi there!
Does anyone know where I can find the mass/weight of the battery packs for the various Tesla models? This information doesn't appear in Tesla's online literature that I can find, but I also don't own a Tesla so I'm wondering if it can be found in an owner's manual? (I also tried calling the parts/service/sales departments of Tesla with no luck so far!) -- Especially looking for info on Model 3 if anyone knows!
Thanks!
 

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I don't recall seeing the actual mass of a battery pack documented anywhere but the number of cells in each pack is known, for Model S & X anyway, so if you find the mass of an individual cell you can work out a rough value.

I don't think there are many details out there about the Model 3 which is composed of different cells anyway.
 

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What is it that you actually want to know and why? There is the mass of the cells, of the assembly, of the system with electronics? We can provide informed estimates, but without knowing what you want to do with the fact, may not be an appropriate estimate.

Whichever answer you're after there, it'll be in the range 600 to 1000kg.

The 60kWh GM Bolt battery pack is 436kg. This is a more advanced package than the Tesla skate-board packs that came before it, so I'd say they are at least 50% more than that.
 

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You could find the difference between each of the packs as the cars have a weight sticker on the door pillar. It wouldn't however give you the base weight :(

I do know mine (the original 60 pack with fewer cells) weighs enough less to specify a lower psi figure for the tyres vs a similar vintage 85.
 

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@DBMandrake the problem with Google is the official figures simply aren't released, so at best you get the most popular piece of speculation ;)

We will have to wait for the likes of Jason Hughes to actually take one apart (the Model 3 pack) and weigh it / run 3rd party tests to validate capacity :(
 

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@DBMandrake the problem with Google is the official figures simply aren't released, so at best you get the most popular piece of speculation ;)

We will have to wait for the likes of Jason Hughes to actually take one apart (the Model 3 pack) and weigh it / run 3rd party tests to validate capacity :(
It's not speculation - there have been full tear downs of Tesla packs and they have been weighed. The original 85kWh pack weighs 544Kg for example.

The information is out there for Model S and X if you do a little digging. As you say - no figure on the Model 3 yet until someone does a tear down...and that could be a while as it will probably have to wait for a wrecked car!

I wonder who will have the dubious honour of the first Model 3 writeoff...
 

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What components of the pack does that 544 figure cover?
 

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What components of the pack does that 544 figure cover?
As far as I can remember (it's a while since I researched this) it was not just the weight of the cells, it was the weight of the whole thing including the "skateboard" chassis that the cells are in.

So if you dropped the pack off the car as a whole unit that's what it would weigh. And from what I remember the weight of the chassis enclosing the cells is a considerable portion of that 544Kg - something like 200Kg, maybe more. But when you consider it doubles as a major structural member of the floor pan that provides a lot of side impact strength and would need to be provided battery or not it's not as bad as the figures look on paper.

Making the enclosure of the battery double as a structural member of the car is a clever piece of engineering.
 

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It's not speculation - there have been full tear downs of Tesla packs and they have been weighed. The original 85kWh pack weighs 544Kg for example.
Intuitively that seems implausibly light. I'm struggling to see how a Model S weighs 2.5 tonnes if the battery pack only weighs that much. The chassis and body is all aluminium so lighter than a comparable ICE car. The engine, gearbox and diff from a comparable ICE car must be >400kg. The electric motors can't be massively heavy.
 

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@BobM that was my initial thinking too. I know my car is just shy of 2t (original 60 pack), and being all aluminium (right down to the wishbones) I can't see where the missing weight is..

Even silly things like the super flimsy parcel shelf, light one piece dash, super skinny seats, lack of grab handles , missing vanity mirror lights. minimal screws and fixings (compared to something German), the extra 3-400kg (vs say a BMW 520d) of weight must come from somewhere. The obvious explanation would be the pack.

Saying that the inverters / motor / charger / cooling loop etc. must add a chunk of weight.

I think Tesla engineers worked _really_ hard hitting a 2t target for the initial brief (the pre-AP RWD S). However after they saw that no one really cared about the weight with the 0-60 times of the AWD cars, they have got progressively portlier ever since.
 

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As far as I can remember (it's a while since I researched this) it was not just the weight of the cells, it was the weight of the whole thing including the "skateboard" chassis that the cells are in.
This is where I think Teslanomics may have been applied to vehicle mass too.

The cells themselves should amount to around 350kg, this is simply from the total number of 18650 cells required for 85kWh.

I reckon wiring and internal BMS electronics modules would be around the 20~40kg range. Depends how much internal routing of the high current cables, those batteries have to deliver 1000A for the performance.

The Teslanomics will come in when trying to separate out the battery box from the chassis, as some mass will be strictly to package the cells into modules, some will be structural to hold the modules in place and some will be to stabilise and hold the whole lot rigid.

However, some of that final battery box structure will contribute to holding the chassis rigid. I suspect the car would be less than designed stiffness if the battery box isn't bolted onto it, and vice versa. Not that there is anything bad about that design principle at all, but I suspect when they want the battery to sound light when they spin the details, some of that ends up in the 'bodywork' category, and when they want the bodywork to sound light, they don't quote the part of the battery mass that helps add rigidity.

This was why I was trying to understand why the OP is asking the question.
 

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I'm struggling to see how a Model S weighs 2.5 tonnes if the battery pack only weighs that much.
It doesn't. The kerb weight of an S85 is 2108kg.

That's 413kg more than the smallest engine (front wheel drive) variant of the Audi A7, which is also aluminium bodied.

So a 550kg battery mass feels about right, doesn't it?
 

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Intuitively that seems implausibly light. I'm struggling to see how a Model S weighs 2.5 tonnes if the battery pack only weighs that much. The chassis and body is all aluminium so lighter than a comparable ICE car. The engine, gearbox and diff from a comparable ICE car must be >400kg. The electric motors can't be massively heavy.
As someone else mentioned, they are more like 2.1 tonnes. But even with a lightweight chassis, it's pretty much impossible to make an EV match an equivalent ICE on weight. Even small EVs are usually 150+ kg heavier than their ICE counterparts due mainly to battery weight. BMW made a big effort to minimise the weight of their i3 with the use of composites etc, but there isn't really an ICE equivalent of that to compare directly.
 
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