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Has any one in a Leaf or Zoe experienced Tesla destination charging?
Whist the rapids are exclusive to Tesla I have heard that the destination type 2 are not.
 

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They won't be of use to Leaf drivers, as they are tethered type-2. Should be useful to Zoe drivers however.
 

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So I've seen (online) that its just a standard 7kw (or maybe 22kw) unit with a tethered type 2. No need to swipe a card, just plug in and feed! Not sure if Tesla will be putting up big signs saying TESLA only though and quite how they'll police it.
 

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So I've seen (online) that its just a standard 7kw (or maybe 22kw) unit with a tethered type 2. No need to swipe a card, just plug in and feed! Not sure if Tesla will be putting up big signs saying TESLA only though and quite how they'll police it.
The units they are using appear to be the same as the units they're going to sell. Someone posted a link to the instruction manual which had a dial that allows you to specify the available circuit power. That dial has a load of extra positions that are marked as unused. I suspect that those other settings might be a Tesla only option, or possibly a custom firmware update that locks it to Tesla only. I'm pretty sure I read somewhere that at each site with multiple bays, a certain percentage of bays will be Tesla only.
 

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The hardware is a tethered type2 point capable of up to 32A three-phase, depending on the available power. They can also be installed in groups of up to four, sharing the available power depending on the demand from the cars currently plugged in. So a typical install would be a couple of points sharing 22kW between them, such that you'd get 22kW if you were the only car charging. Some sites have less if there's no three-phase or limited power overall - there's one hotel on the map in the far north of Scotland that apparently has 2 points with only 4kW shared between them!

It's up to the site how they control access, and most of them are "customers only" - which is reasonable for a destination charging facility.

Apparently there is a contract between the site and Tesla whereby they are supposed to give some degree of priority to Tesla drivers but are free to allow other customers to use them ("reserve some of the capacity for Tesla drivers" was the phrase he used, but I don't know what the actual contract wording is). It's fairly clear that there's no actual Tesla-only feature built into the hardware. It was also said that hotels would normally allow you to book use of the charger with your room, though it's up to them how they organize it.

The ones announced so far are mostly at high-end hotels and the like, though it was promised that there's lots more locations already signed up and going through installation, with more affordable locations among them.

Map here if you haven't seen it - you can click on the black markers and see power ratings and access arrangements:

Find Us | Tesla Motors UK
 

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The general format is 2 Tesla marked bays, and 1 general EV marked bay, they are capable of 22kW and are load balanced.

The Tesla marked chargers will not work with normal Type-2 vehicles, they use a modified pilot signal that doesn't behave with a i3 for example.

When using the "Normal" EV unit, you need to remember to press the button on the top of the handle that will set the protocol going.
 

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The general format is 2 Tesla marked bays, and 1 general EV marked bay, they are capable of 22kW and are load balanced.

The Tesla marked chargers will not work with normal Type-2 vehicles, they use a modified pilot signal that doesn't behave with a i3 for example.

When using the "Normal" EV unit, you need to remember to press the button on the top of the handle that will set the protocol going.

That's a bit faggy of Tesla. All of these chargers are ours, we might through you a crumb though. Oh and all those other chargers we contributed sod all too we'll happily abuse too.
 

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Just to reiterate these adapter cables are not standards approved. The connectors might be approved, but how they have made them up is definitely not.
On their website it says:

Certification & Safety:
  • Europe - CE, TUV approval
  • USA - UL approval
Does that not mean that they are standards approved?
 

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On their website it says:

Certification & Safety:
  • Europe - CE, TUV approval
  • USA - UL approval
Does that not mean that they are standards approved?
The connectors and cables may be individually, but the way they have been assembled is not.
 

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Not sure what you mean. What is wrong with their assembly? And how can they sell them legally without type approval?
A 13A UK mains plug is "approved" but if I connected the live pin to a piece of metal and sold it to you it wouldn't exactly be safe :rolleyes:

That supplier is taking a huge risk as if someone was electrocuted they would be liable and I doubt have valid product liability insurance.

Product liability and safety law - GOV.UK
 

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Not sure what you mean. What is wrong with their assembly? And how can they sell them legally without type approval?
The issues that immediately come to mind:
  • The standards are written such that any combination of the permitted cables is fool-proof: with cars/cables/chargepoints that meet the standard, any combination that you can physically plug together will work safely, automatically reducing the current to whichever has the lower capability of those three elements. The adapters we are talking about here break that arrangement (they chargepoint has no way of knowing the current rating of the adapter). You can use it safely if you have carefully selected the adapter to match the charging capability of your car (and make sure nobody borrows it to use with one of different capability), but you've taken away one of the protections offered by the standards and made it no longer 'foolproof'.
  • The standards provide for the connectors to be locked such that you can't pull them out while under load. Furthermore, the standards provide a 'proximity' circuit that's designed to cut off the power quickly if the connectors do start to disengage (it has a shorter pin). These adapters do not lock, and (I believe) do not pass through the proximity circuit. They do pass through the control pilot, so power will eventually be cut off, but this is likely to be slower than the PP.
  • These connectors are not designed to be waterproof; instead, they have drain holes so that rainwater etc. can drain out if they are used in the appropriate orientation. These adapters are using the connectors hanging on the end of a piece of cable which is not how they are intended to be used, and at least potentially have an issue with water running down the cable, though I am not sure how serious (if at all) this actually is in practice.
So in summary, the adaptors are not disastrously unsafe, but they certainly offer a lower level of safety than that envisaged by the standards.

As for whether they can be legally sold, IMO this is a slightly grey area. So far as I am aware (without having researched it in detail) there isn't any specific legislation that invokes the IEC standards for EV charging, so products like this are just covered by general product liability law. In these circumstances, it's a good defence under the law when things go wrong if you can show that your product follows national or international standards - you have demonstrated that you took reasonable precautions to make it safe. If it doesn't follow standards, the burden is on you to show that the design is adequately safe.

A similar issue arises if you consider using one of these for workplace charging - under the Electricity at Work regulations, the employer has an obligation to prevent danger to employees and again following standards is the easiest way to demonstrate that you've carried out your obligation.

Personally, I'd be happy to use one of these adapters occasionally under my own close supervision, but I'd be wary of issuing them to staff or allowing them to be used routinely with the risk that they may be 'borrowed' for an inappropriate use.
 

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Yes - how is this any less safe than for example the Tesla Chademo adaptor that many Tesla owners use? That also carries much larger current.
 
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