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Hi all,

just after some advice really,
I have owned my Tesla Model 3 Performance since Sept 2019 and after numerous visits to the SC, Tesla have been unable to resolve a leaking boot.

So far they have replaced the boot seal
Adjusted the boot door (damaging some paint in the process - no repaired)
Sealed the boot to close of any gaps from missing factory bonding glue etc

What are my options?

Kind regards,

Riz
 

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Hi all,

just after some advice really,
I have owned my Tesla Model 3 Performance since Sept 2019 and after numerous visits to the SC, Tesla have been unable to resolve a leaking boot.

So far they have replaced the boot seal
Adjusted the boot door (damaging some paint in the process - no repaired)
Sealed the boot to close of any gaps from missing factory bonding glue etc

What are my options?

Kind regards,

Riz
Just a few thoughts ... I assume that your boot has leaked since Day 1 and therefore Tesla don't consider it to be a potential faulty accident repair. My comment to Tesla (and I expect you have already said the equivalent) is that 'A £50k car should not leak, therefore please do whatever is necessary to fix it'. As a layman, I see the fault as one or more of a misshaped body area around the boot opening, a misshaped or misaligned boot lid, faulty or incorrectly fitted seals or a hole in the boot itself.

I guess that the leak results in water gathering in the boot well. Either because that is where it enters the boot or because it is the lowest point in the boot. I would check for any dampness on any of the felt anywhere in the boot. If the only wet area is the boot well then I would check the various rubber seals in the boot well. I suggest (either you or Tesla) removes the felt liner for the boot well and everything in the boot, then place soft paper (kitchen towel or the blue paper used to wipe things in the workshop) over the seals. Then spray their car cleaning hose at the footwell from underneath. Then check the paper for any wet areas.

My final but polite request to Tesla is that clearly the boot leaks, either fix it or replace everything to make it fixed. I would also suggest that they consider replacing the body around the boot area if necessary, implying that they replace the car. I'm not suggesting or expecting them to actually do that but my comment would be intended to help them focus on the point that it must be fixed and soon. I always remain polite but make it clear that the issue WILL be resolved properly, whatever it takes. I would also suggest to them that I am happy to talk to any other Tesla branch or 'Head Office'; if they are unable to fix it locally. I think you know what I mean by this. But they are people too and have good days and bad days so I always try to bring out the best in the them, to help them to help me. :)
 

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With my leaking boot it would only leak when on a steep hill, They replaced the glass. that was there first port of call. No re ocurrance.
I take it they haven't tried that solution?
 

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Sorry to hear of the issue and it is a shame that it has gone on so long. Personally I would have taken stronger action within 6 months, but you are where you are.

If you have proof of the fault soon after delivery, you may still have grounds to reject the car but I would use that as a threat rather than action it. See link below
There are some good suggestions above, but another option would be to try and get them to swap car for equivalent used model, but you would then have a 2 owner car. Also, after this amount of time and with less legal recourse, they may not be keen to help. Check your car insurance legal cover to see if it helps, some include taking action against a dealer and a letter from a solicitor to them may help your cause.

Good luck.
 

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Hyundai Kona, Halfords bike
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What are my options?
A claim under the sale of Goods act "not fit for purpose" This has to be with the retailer.

We've had a couple of successes with these types of claims, resolve without having to go to small claims even.

In the first case it was Citroen, after updating software five or six times in 3 years they had to admit there was an inherent fault with the gearbox they couldn't fit. A rep from visited us to negotiate a solution and in the end offered a buy back at a price half way between new and the book dealer selling price. So on a 3 year old car with a book price of £11000 they have us £16000.

The main dealers are mostly very scared of the manufacturer, in another case I can't go into the exact details of, we had a compliant with the dealer who did nothing until we contaced the manufcaturer with all details of the issue and what the dealer hadn't done (including saying they would contact us and didn't). Once the manufacturer contacted the dealer they suddenly jumped to it and made us a very decent buy back offer.

It sounds like your car is just a lemon, unless you can find others with the same issue.
 

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Hyundai Kona, Halfords bike
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A claim under the sale of Goods act "not fit for purpose" This has to be with the retailer.

We've had a couple of successes with these types of claims, resolve without having to go to small claims even.

In the first case it was Citroen, after updating software five or six times in 3 years they had to admit there was an inherent fault with the gearbox they couldn't fit. A rep from visited us to negotiate a solution and in the end offered a buy back at a price half way between new and the book dealer selling price. So on a 3 year old car with a book price of £11000 they have us £16000.

The main dealers are mostly very scared of the manufacturer, in another case I can't go into the exact details of, we had a compliant with the dealer who did nothing until we contaced the manufcaturer with all details of the issue and what the dealer hadn't done (including saying they would contact us and didn't). Once the manufacturer contacted the dealer they suddenly jumped to it and made us a very decent buy back offer.

It sounds like your car is just a lemon, unless you can find others with the same issue.
Often just mentioning "not fit for purpose" will do the trick, otherwise small claims is not expensive or complicated.
 

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A claim under the sale of Goods act "not fit for purpose" This has to be with the retailer.

We've had a couple of successes with these types of claims, resolve without having to go to small claims even.

In the first case it was Citroen, after updating software five or six times in 3 years they had to admit there was an inherent fault with the gearbox they couldn't fit. A rep from visited us to negotiate a solution and in the end offered a buy back at a price half way between new and the book dealer selling price. So on a 3 year old car with a book price of £11000 they have us £16000.

The main dealers are mostly very scared of the manufacturer, in another case I can't go into the exact details of, we had a compliant with the dealer who did nothing until we contaced the manufcaturer with all details of the issue and what the dealer hadn't done (including saying they would contact us and didn't). Once the manufacturer contacted the dealer they suddenly jumped to it and made us a very decent buy back offer.

It sounds like your car is just a lemon, unless you can find others with the same issue.
Of course in this case the dealer is the manufacturer.

Certainly the OP should ask what options he has left if they can't fix the problem.
 
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