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Interesting what he said about hydrogen I know there s lots of views on that but can't get away from the fact that fuel is running out and there appears no long term fix in action. Always thought that hydrogen would be an effective energy carrier from off shore / remote generation, whether that be wind / solar / tidal etc. But he's wrong about electric cars. Surely demand from Electronic cars is by it's nature during off peak times so is an effective leveller of power peaks and troughs if managed correctly.?
 

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Surely demand from Electronic cars is by it's nature during off peak times so is an effective leveller of power peaks and troughs if managed correctly.?
Pretty much. Most cars are in use for commuting during the morning and afternoon peaks, so charging is less likely then. However, peak electricity demand in winter is between 4pm and 8pm – which could coincide with EV owners returning home and putting their cars on charge. (Probably not those with E7 meters).
 

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I can't believe he liked it that much.:)
The only really stupid comment's being the hydrogen and PHEV ones. I wonder if he not made so may negative coments in the past if he would be ready to go out and buy one
 

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@Robwiz my point is that most EV's have a communication infrastructure in place (such as Carwings) so it is feasible for energy companies to communicate with the car and adjust charging times to suit the demand troughs. If I were to give the car an instruction such as 'I need 80% by 7 am' then with the right algorithms charging could be turned on and off remotely as required by the network then if the required charge would not be reached by a certain time eg 3am then enough time would remain for the car to over ride and charge constantly for 3 hours until the required charge were met. I think there 's loads of development that could be done in this area (provided there were attractive tariffs in place to suit ;-)
 

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I have said it before but its worth saying again. EV's could be a cure for the power station shortage, as long as you have the correct protocol in the car. They can be used as massive storage buffers, drawing power out of the cars during peek demand to be replaced during the night.
 

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There is lots of academic research into micro generation and using car batteries effectively to manage demand and power shortage. My thesis was looking into using market algorithms to manage clearing of electricity grid markets.

I believe ecotricity are deploying "Black Boxes" to customers with micro generation, which are essentially grid batteries for a fraction of the cost. They can then remote charge or discharge them depending on their renewable output, your renewable output or current market rates - so for instance ecotricity could store there wind energy out of the grid until peak rate later in the day and make more money.

It also makes more sense as you don't have as much transmission loss as you try and use as much power as you can within a small local area (micro-grids) Nissan also have a prototype leaf, that can be rigged up to work in a similar way.

There are lots of cool things you can do if proliferation into the market is high enough, but even if there isn't the market pressure on battery prices mean it becomes feasible to install a battery pack with your PV array regardless of having an EV or not.
 
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