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"The proposed contract between EDF and the UK government to build one or two new nuclear power stations, the first of which will be at Hinkley Point, is likely to run into legal difficulties, especially at EU level, and to require renegotiation. Those difficulties are largely the result of the proposed contract being too favourable to EDF. Renegotiation is therefore in the interest not only of the UK government but also of EDF itself, since otherwise EDF might find that it cannot protect its investment and might find itself holding some very large stranded assets. As part of that renegotiation, the government should address the problem that in the course of very long term contracts, not only technological, economic and political conditions are likely to change but also very legal environment on which the contracts depend. It should also address the problem that such contracts, when legally binding, restrict the ability of future parliaments to influence policy, so that excluding parliament from decisions to make them is highly questionable."

http://www.law.cam.ac.uk/people/academic/sf-deakin/22/blog/#article93
 

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Good, take the plans and put them in the shredder (and then recycle them). Create the standard for Vehicle 2 Grid today, change the law so any new building with a power connection needs solar panels on the roof to be approved from today. We no longer have an "energy gap".

Thankyou and good night.
 

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The problem with that is V2G.
1)Car batteries are expensive.
2)Car batteries have a limited number charge/discharge cycles.
3)Car batteries take a long time to charge (and will get longer as packs get bigger).
So where's the benefit for the owner of the car in V2G.

Case1.
I get home at 6 with a flat battery.
It needs to charge and will take 8 hours.
The electricity peak is 6-9pm.
How does V2G work?

Case2.
I get home at 6pm, with 30% charge.
I help the grid for a bit, depleting the battery to 15% (into the big wear zone).
How does this help me?

Unless I'm helping keep the lights on (physically due to too little peak capacity) and the power companies are going to pay me over the odds for the electric I've fed back or the recharge (at least back to 30%) is going to be free, then all I'm doing is wearing the battery pack out even faster than by driving the car.

Using a worn out battery pack is another matter, when my Leafs battery pack has 50% of it's original capacity it won't be much use in the car, but, say,10kWh of capacity with easily run my home for a couple of evenings/nights.
 

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1) but people are buying them already, and they are getting larger, cheaper and more popular.

2)ok, but they can already provide "life of the car" cycles, and are getting better.

3) perhaps the benefit is initially financial for the driver (since load balancing saves power generators money), but eventually it becomes a legal requirement.

If your case 1 is a regular occurrence (arriving home at close to 0% charge) then I don't think you should buy an EV in the first place! Arriving anywhere with a SOC so low is a bad idea. For case 2, depends how big that 30% is!

My personal suggestion would be a small buffer within the pack that's not accessible/seen by the driver. Something like 4kwh from the 85kwh pack of the tesla would be about right. So when you plug in at 6pm that 4kwh can help feed your oven and Eastenders until bedtime, when your car then starts sucking juice from the grid. It tops "your" charge first and then the grid buffer. If you're plugged in at the office during the day that 4kwh can be used again if needed, and when solar peak time happens fill it back up.
 

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1) True
2) I don't thick that's been proved yet. 鈽
3) I think making it a legal requirement is going to be tricky/impossible.
I take your point about case 1.
I've heard that idea before, but fundamentally it means I have carry around 4kWh of battery pack, for 10,000 miles a year, that I'm not allowed to use, and have to pay for electricity to push it around. It would be better to just have one of Ecotricitys 'Black boxes' and be done with it.
 
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