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is it woeful though? granted i only have UK experience but there are lots of pretty good chargers out there. Now that intavolt / gridserve / osprey have built their networks up, I dont think its fair to use 'woeful' as a descriptor. If you expect all chargers to be equal and dont engage in planning prior to longer journeys then maybe.
 

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I thought the article was very accurate of the network the author chose to use...

"I picked up the car in London and went to my nearest recharging point, an Ubitricity outlet in Richmond, southwest London. The point was behind a resident’s parking bay, and in Richmond they’re always taken. Even with an extra-long lead it was unusable. I took advice from electric car owners. Download the apps in advance and always leave enough range to get to the next charge point, and preferably the one after that. One of the better apps, I was told, was BP Pulse. I downloaded that and put £50 on it."​

BP Pulse... probably his first big mistake. He even went on to mention this in the article:

"I eventually found another on a street corner in Hounslow and spent 90 minutes catching up on emails while pondering how much commitment an oil company has to helping the demise of oil."​

I liked the bit about "Funded by the UK Government"...

"The BP app showed Worcester to be well served with chargers. All six at St Martin’s Gate car park had covers on them indicating they were out of use. Around the corner in Crowngate Shopping Centre there were two in a dark corner of a multistorey. One was occupied, so I squeezed into the next bay. The charger sported a Union Jack bearing the legend “Funded by UK government” and it was broken, all three cables spread forlornly in the dirt. With the other chap only at 40 percent it looked as though it would be a long wait, so I set a course for the Malvern hotel six miles away, where the app showed a 50kW charger free. Alas, by the time I got there it was taken."​

He apparently had a successful charge from Gridserve at Moto Lancaster but he did say it was an Ecotricity. Maybe the branding hadn't been updated yet.

His conclusion was, at best, a reflection on the sorry state of the charging network which we, on here, tend to not notice because we usually know what to look out for. For anyone moving over to an EV, it can seem like a mistake after experiencing the charging network.

"An hour and a half later I had enough power to get home. I glided into Bodmin soon after 7 pm having been on the road for 12 hours, of which almost six were spent charging or hunting for charging points. As I collapsed into bed I pondered that, on the basis of discussions with other drivers, my experience was the norm. Electric cars would be perfect if you charged them overnight with a home wallbox, then used them only to run around locally before repeating the process. Or if you drove them only within the battery range of the vehicle. Beyond that, you’d better be prepared for delays and disappointments."​
Overall, a good article that highlights the woeful state of the charging infrastructure. His biggest mistake was probably going for the BP Pulse app and loading it with £50.

"As to cost, I’m confused. Before I left I put £50 into the app, and it’s still there — BP Pulse debited my credit card for the juice. The cost was £7 in Hounslow, £10.67 in Cannock, £3.10 in Lancaster and £13.37 in Gloucester. Plus a bottle of Châteauneuf."​
Who was the eejit that told him that BP Pulse was one of the better apps to use?
 

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Who was the eejit that told him that BP Pulse was one of the better apps to use?
He obviously hadn’t done any proper research…about right for a journalist!
 
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Kia E-Niro 2021 4+
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Our two week summer trip with the Niro was a joy. Never had to queue, all chargers working, complete range from Instavolts to 7kW coin operated destination point. I had done my research, listened to advice on here, religiously checked on ZapMap and Plugshare to see if charge points had been used successfully in the last 48 hours. A bit of planning required but otherwise a seamless and happy experience. In summer hols. In the Lake District and along major trunk routes. If we’d set out without a plan or doing any prior reading it may well have been different…
 

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Seems like a fair story and BP pulse is sometimes OK. Three of my longer distance visits to relatives are made possible by nearby BP Pulse rapids that haven't let me down yet, but two of those trips would be easier if BP had actually got around to switching on multiple charger sites that were installed more than a year ago. It's a good thing to shame the oil companies pretending to provide charging. I did a quick survey of the Shell Newmotion chargers a coupe of months ago and about a third of them were offline. Would Shell put up with a third of their petrol stations being shut for no good reason?
 

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Our two week summer trip with the Niro was a joy. Never had to queue, all chargers working, complete range from Instavolts to 7kW coin operated destination point. I had done my research, listened to advice on here, religiously checked on ZapMap and Plugshare to see if charge points had been used successfully in the last 48 hours. A bit of planning required but otherwise a seamless and happy experience. In summer hols. In the Lake District and along major trunk routes. If we’d set out without a plan or doing any prior reading it may well have been different…
rigorous checking seems beyond most of the population. Im lucky enough to be going for a longer range car (e niro) with a home charger so mostly wont need public charing 90% of the time. But im still concerned about the next 3-5 years where ownership will explode but charging wont keep pace, leading to some pretty bad experiences.
 

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Our two week summer trip with the Niro was a joy. Never had to queue, all chargers working, complete range from Instavolts to 7kW coin operated destination point. I had done my research, listened to advice on here, religiously checked on ZapMap and Plugshare to see if charge points had been used successfully in the last 48 hours. A bit of planning required but otherwise a seamless and happy experience. In summer hols. In the Lake District and along major trunk routes. If we’d set out without a plan or doing any prior reading it may well have been different…
The point is you don't need to do the same with petrol stations. I can type 'petrol station' into Google on my phone and come across a station which almost certainly will sell unleaded for my PHEV.

However if I type charging station in (let's pretend for now I've got a BEV), while I will get a list of rapid chargers I will not have any idea as to whether network X is better than network Y.

Neither will I know in advance if I need a charging network app, with pre-credit, or something else like an RFID card, before I go. I can just insert my credit card in the petrol pump, so I should be able to do the same at every other EV charger.

I recently had a BMW i3 while my GTE was being repaired (accident repair), and I thought it would be interesting to see how the charging network for BEVs was. Trip from St Neots to Southwold. On our journey we decided to stop at Bury St Edmunds to charge while eating lunch

  • 7kW BP chargers in the multistorey were out of service
  • one 50kW at the petrol station had a queue of three e-taxis backed up, all Leaf 40's, so I knew it would be some time and went elsewhere
  • 3kW AC points at Waitrose were in service, but with a 90 minute max stay, it seemed a bit pointless

When we continued onto Scole, we found the 3-bay BP Polar station to be in good order, and charging was as fast as the i3 could accept, but the poor gentleman next to me couldn't figure out half the strange screens that it was flashing through about apps and RFID. He just had a contactless card and wanted to charge. Even though I consider myself a tech savvy person it took the best part of five minutes to get charging. That's the length of an ordinary petrol stop.

At our destination both the AC charge points were ICE'd, which meant a 65 mph drive home as we only had 70% left on the battery. Arrived with 5%.

Must be better!

We need things more like MFG, Gridserve stations and Instavolt where we just have banks and banks of fast chargers that are maintained well and we can just pay with contactless.
 

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Everyone who is new to EVs immediately seems to take a long trip to the West Country for some reason.
Funny you should mention that... it's exactly what I did during my first week of EV driving 🤣
(from London to Exeter and back, plus day trips to Cornwall, Bristol, Totnes, Dartmoor park, and the Jurassic Coast, for a total of about 1,400 miles, all on public charging and with no prior experience!)
 
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Our two week summer trip with the Niro was a joy. Never had to queue, all chargers working, complete range from Instavolts to 7kW coin operated destination point. I had done my research, listened to advice on here, religiously checked on ZapMap and Plugshare to see if charge points had been used successfully in the last 48 hours.
Why the hell should we have to do any reasearch? We should be able to rock up to any rapid charger, expect it to be working, present our contactless bank card or phone and buy some electrons just like ICE drivers do now with petrol or diesel.
 

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Why the hell should we have to do any reasearch? We should be able to rock up to any rapid charger, expect it to be working, present our contactless bank card or phone and buy some electrons just like ICE drivers do now with petrol or diesel.
Well really I couldn’t agree more.

But it’s not quite like that (yet). We took on an EV knowing it would take a little more thinking than an ICE but the reality is it’s about 10 minutes while working out a route somewhere when we go out of range (3-4 times a year max). So, for us (and I don’t speak for every EV driver) the way things are at the moment is bearable, in the knowledge it will improve.
I’m about to start a project for my local council (they don’t know it yet) about increasing EV ownership locally and making our town (which is a lovely tourist spot on a major trunk road, but currently sh1t for charging) attractive to passing EVs for a charge and the associated footfall that would bring as well as people deciding to stay here on holiday etc.
 

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Of course we would like to have reliable chargers and hopefully that is the direction of travel. At the moment this is only an issue for me personally a few times a year (with a holiday coming up this will be one of them and then doing some homework is not much more than having to plan where I stop for a coffee). The rest of the time it is a nonissue because unlike having to visit a garage and paying 140p a litre I fill up at home. So when the lorries do not deliver petrol (after all we have a driver shortage !!!) the unions blockade a refinery or the garage closes for the night Iam still able to keep my car running.

I know why journalist run these stories (two camps here..the ones who genuinely want EVs to be adopted so keep pressing for improvement and the others being lobbyied by the oil and car industry to slow things).

Like the former..
 

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I've had very little problems with charging over the last 4 years but this summers holiday wasn't straight forward as the local charges were mostly bp/cyc and we only found one rapid in the area that was working, and that was over 10 miles away so wasn't convenient very often.

Looking on zapmap etc. I thought charging was going to be easy as Derbyshire has lots of charge points but we weren't parking in places where the destination chargers were situated very often and most of the rapids were broken and had been for months.
Getting there and back was easy but keeping the car charged during the week wasn't so simple.
 
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