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Discussion Starter #1
Still getting used to my GTE and find myself constantly switching in an out of B mode (regen engine braking) instead of braking normally, i.e. when approaching queues, junctions, roundabouts. As soon as i pick up speed again I flick it back into D to allow coasting, which seems to work brilliantly.

On faster A/B roads and motorways I use adaptive cruise (best feature ever, period) in D mode 90% of the time, but will sometimes disengage cruise and switch to B mode when slowing down for a roundabout or lights, especially when travelling downhill.

Are others using B as often as I do, or do you guys have a different approach? Appreciate i’m very much an e-newb so keen to pick up some tips.
 

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Golf GTE owner rather than Passat, but for me I think it comes down to personal preference.

The consensus seems to be that always driving in D mode is more efficient. When you use the brake pedal it initially used regen braking until you press harder / regen reduces at which point the friction brakes start to work.

Personally I just use B mode all the time.
 

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I do the same, switch between D and B mode. Becomes second nature after a while. It's amazing how far the GTE can coast when in D.

Note that if B mode is slowing you too quickly you can reduce it with the throttle. It's obvious but something I had not picked up on until mentioned on this forum.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Interesting about using the throttle to lessen the regen braking, will definitely give that a try, cheers.
 

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I do the same, switch between D and B mode. Becomes second nature after a while. It's amazing how far the GTE can coast when in D.

Note that if B mode is slowing you too quickly you can reduce it with the throttle. It's obvious but something I had not picked up on until mentioned on this forum.
Agreed, I use to find that 95% of the time I would use D mode and then pull back on the shifter to get b mode if I needed the car to slow down more quickly with out the need to touch the brake until the last few yards.
Loved playing the "Regen Game".
After a bit of practice you are able to judge it just right !.
It is not too different in a pure EV.
You just don't have to keep pulling back on the gear selector on most EV's.
Instead, you learn to feather the rate of how quickly you remove your foot from the "GO" pedal if you are in max regen mode.
I don't think the strength of the regen can be TOO strong really, you just have to get use to driving that way.
One pedal driving is brilliant.
 

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Don't use B mode at all personally. Far more efficient to step off the gas earlier and coast for longer if you know you need to stop/slow down.
 

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Don't use B mode at all personally. Far more efficient to step off the gas earlier and coast for longer if you know you need to stop/slow down.
Although I do totally agree with your favoured use of “D” mode to allow the car to coast longer to increase efficiency, this could also be improved further by incorporating the manual use of “B” mode.
By allowing the car to first coast in “D” mode, then manually increasing the reduction in speed by applying max regen in “B” mode, will increase the efficiency by almost cancelling out the use of the foot brake.
The friction brakes will then only be required to finally bring the car to a complete stand still.
Using max regen firstly over any use of the fiction brakes, has the added advantage of increasing efficiency and the reduction in the wear of fiction linings materials.
On a BEV the regen is usually of a much stronger standard ( unless manually adjusted ) and requires a much tighter control of your releasing of your foot from the “Go” pedal.
I think that the brake friction material on most EV’s will out last the car itself !.
 

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Gentle braking with brake pedal engages battery regen so is the same as using B mode (without having to mess about with the lever). The AID shows this. End result is the same whether you use brake pedal or gear shift to put into B mode.
 

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When travelling in "D" mode and then coasting, by removing your foot from the "Go" pedal to reduce your speed, then manually engaging the max regen by pulling back on the gear selector ( prior to using of any fiction brakes ) this is maximising ALL of the regen the car as to offer, this has to be a more efficient way to protect / preserve the small amount of electrical range the car has to offer in the first place I think.
E.g. - You are leaving a motorway by taking a long slip road and are reducing your speed by coasting in "D" mode, as you approach the next junction / round about at the end of the slip road.
If you pull back on the selector to engage the max regen EARLY to reduce your speed quickly, you are purely using the electric motor here to reduce the cars speed, and therefore NO friction braking from the manual foot brake of the car is used to decrease the car speed.
Pulling back on the lever JUST at the right time ( which is the main aim of the regen game ) eliminates the use of any use of the foot brake, until the very last second of course and then ONLY if you are forced to bring the car to a complete stand still.
Give it a go, the regen game is used by many GTE owners, but beware it can become additive !.
I do understand that by hitting the footbrake, that it does increase the regen, but trust me, it is not the same as manually engaging "B" mode early.
After owning a GTE for over four years, I can truly say it does not come even close in my book.
Okay, look at it this way.
You are on a flat section of road and have been travelling at just under the speed limit of 60 Mph for a while.
You then approach a very steep down hill section in the road, with a long gradual decent lasting over a few miles.
What are you going to do, you are currently travelling in "D" mode and as the steep decent increases, so does your road speed.
You are now quickly approaching the max speed limit for that section of road.
Are you going to cover the foot brake to decrease the speed by using the fiction brakes ?.
Or alternatively you could reduce the speed slightly, and as a bonus collect some range on the GOM - by pulling back on the lever and therefore engaging the "B" mode function.
NO friction material as been used here and you may have just collected a few extra miles of electrical energy in the process, when you reach the bottom of the decline.
At this point you have already returned the car to "D" mode once again.
It is worth noting that when travelling in EV mode only, in this situation the car detects the speed is increasing and if regen is not available ( HV pack almost fully charged ) it will automatically induce the ICE to provide engine braking to reduce the cars speed due to the steep incline.
The GTE has a pretty small HV pack and therefore ANY opportunity to grab some recuperation should be taken full advantage of.
I understand that some GTE owners can not even be bothered with plugging in their cars on a regular basis !.
Well, for these type of folks, non of this make ANY sense what so ever.
They probably bought the car for a alternative reason in the first place anyway.
Treat using the fiction brakes as the very last resort.
This is the way pure EV drivers use their cars all of the time.
 

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You then approach a very steep down hill section in the road, with a long gradual decent lasting over a few miles.
....
NO friction material as been used here and you may have just collected a few extra miles of electrical energy in the process, when you reach the bottom of the decline.
Over a "gradual descent lasting over a few miles", in my experience, will not "collect a few extra miles of electrical energy". It takes many miles to regen 1 or 2 miles extra electrical energy. Also, on a gradual downhill the B mode will slow the car too much, meaning that I have to use the accelerator which in turn uses up petrol/electric energy. It's more costly/inefficient to use more petrol in order to generate the odd extra mile of electric.

I find coasting, with gentle braking if necessary, more efficient.

Maybe I am doing something wrong?
 

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If the gradual decent is short and NOT very steep then yes, you are better using “D” mode to coast.
But when the decent is long and steep, use “B” mode.
It depends on your surrounding and if you have declines steep enough to use the facility.
The strength of the regen in “B” mode will be determined by a few factors.
The steepness of the decline and also the current SOC of battery.
If the battery is almost full, then there is no room for the extra recuperated energy to go.
If the battery is almost empty, then the regen braking will be high.
Because you have manual control, you can regulate the strength by popping in and out of “B” mode by using the level, or engage “B” mode then feather the “Go” pedal to control the strength with your right foot.
You have to experiment really to get the most from the settings.
It’s a personal thing really, just putting the car in “D” mode and driving it is fine, but you are missing out on an important feature.
Trying to conserve your electric range with tools that the car has installed, can all appear to be a lot of trouble if you have the back up of an engine under the bonnet.
When you drive a full EV your focus switch’s, but in a good way.
There is no right and wrong way which mode you favour.
Some folks never ever use “B” mode, some folks ALWAYS use it.
Over four years, I found that you switch to suit either the conditions or your personal driving style.
Another question, how many people use the “Battery Hold” function on the car ( assuming your car has the feature ) or just do you let the car decide ?.
Purely speaking for myself, the battery hold function has to be one of the best features of the car.
Allowing the driver to use the HV battery how and when he / she feels is brilliant.
The GTE is a brilliant piece of technology packed with loads of features that I am sure many drivers fail to explore.
 

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Another question, how many people use the “Battery Hold” function on the car ( assuming your car has the feature ) or just do you let the car decide ?.
Purely speaking for myself, the battery hold function has to be one of the best features of the car.
I'm preferring the "battery reserve" feature on the car (based on less than 2 weeks of ownership). Let's you set a limit on how much it'll discharge the battery, and then you can let the car decide what to do with the electricity you're allowing it to have. I knew I had a bit of EV driving to do around town over the weekend, so when I set off from home, I told the car to reserve 75% of the battery and let it decide what to do with the other 25% for the drive in. Not sure when they introduced the feature, but it's great.
 

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Sounds very much like a newer version of “Battery Hold”.
Some models around 2016 had the “Battery Hold” feature completely missing from the menu ?.
It then got returned to the car when the 7.5 model was introduced.
I strongly considered upgrading to another GTE before I took the plunge and went full EV.
But IF the later cars did not offer
manual control of the electric power usage, then I would have dismissed the car straight away.
Only VW knows the reason why they removed it for a while, stupid omission of a brilliant feature.
I want to decide when and how I intend to use my electrical range, I don’t want the car to dictate it’s usage to me.
When travelling similar routes regularly, you can calculate when and how you are going to use that small range to the best effect.
Doing this regularly will soon display which is the most economic way to use the modes in the car.
Unless you like to instantly switch to GTE mode for every single fast trip that is !.
 

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The newer GTEs still have battery hold, it's called "Maintain" in the manual. Basically hitting "Hybrid" lets the car use the full battery as it sees fit. You can then use up/down arrows to select a level - if the level is above the current battery state, it'll charge from ICE to that level then hold, if it is below the current battery state, it'll use down to the level you've selected then hold. You can also hit the equals button to hold the current state (i.e. "Maintain" or "Battery Hold"). So you have quite a lot of control over it.
 

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I look at it this way, you can never recover the same amount of energy that it took to get going in the first place. So any braking, friction or regen, is wasted energy. Range/mpg is maximised by minimising braking. E.g. 20% of a journey spent coasting is (probably) more efficient than doing the same journey with 20% regen and no coasting. Obviously road conditions will determine whether coasting at every opportunity and minimising braking is suitable or not.

Battery hold is extremely inefficient (in terms of energy use) but is useful if you need to build up some charge for whatever reason e.g. stopping somewhere with no charging facility and wanting to use pre heat/cool later on.
 

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I do understand that by hitting the footbrake, that it does increase the regen, but trust me, it is not the same as manually engaging "B" mode early.
My experience suggests the opposite - i.e. that it is exactly the same, up to the maximum amount of regen available (or "brake energy recuperation" as the manual terms it). In either D or B mode, provided you keep the green bar short of the marker you are not using any friction braking at all; whichever method you use: lift off the accelerator in B or pressing the brake pedal in D or B. It's not until you get to the maximum available regen or very low speeds that the brake pedal will engage the friction brake; so far as I can tell.

For me B mode is way too much - to use it routinely it would always require me to feather the accelerator anyway. I find it way easier to approach a junction by lifting off the accelerator to perhaps coast a little while covering the brake pedal followed by gentle action on the brake pedal to bring the speed down. Adding in switching between D and B modes feathering the accelerator (and then switching back again) seems like an unnecessary added complication. I suppose in an ICE I would have also used engine braking with downshifting, so maybe it's not that different; but I prefer to let the automatic get on with being automatic now I have one.

Unless, of course, I'm in the mood for the GTE button when I might be a tiiiny bit more aggressive with both pedals. Still haven't used the "flappy paddles" ever, though.

Ultimately, so long as you plan ahead and slow down such that the green bar is around full you're getting the most energy recovery you can; irrespective of D or B mode. I guess my variation to the "regen game" is anticipating the road such that I can coast then progressively brake up to the maximum regen, but not beyond, while coming to a smooth stop (or appropriate speed) in the right place.
 

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Hi. Please excuse me posting (just joined) but I am planning on getting a GTE estate soon.
Couple of comments/Q's.
Are the +/- on the gears tick for adjusting the regen or changing gears as per traditional dsg?
What happens if you use the paddles in EV mode or coasting in D? In my head it would either kick the ICE in or increase the regen as per other EVs.

Coming from an oil burning Octavia and never even driven an ev apart from a play in a twizzy.
 

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Are the +/- on the gears tick for adjusting the regen or changing gears as per traditional dsg?
It changes gear :) Motor drives wheels through the gearbox.
What happens if you use the paddles in EV mode or coasting in D? In my head it would either kick the ICE in or increase the regen as per other EVs.
Interesting question - not tried that yet. My guess is it would just change gear. I'll give it a go this evening and let you know (unless somebody already knows and answers before I'm back from the shops).
 

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What happens if you use the paddles in EV mode or coasting in D? In my head it would either kick the ICE in or increase the regen as per other EVs.
Interesting question - not tried that yet. My guess is it would just change gear. I'll give it a go this evening and let you know (unless somebody already knows and answers before I'm back from the shops).
So I was coasting in D and flicked the "-" paddle, and the car shifted down and started regen-ing to slow me down, flicked it up and it coasted again. Basically shifting down does what you'd expect an ICE to do, but using regen instead of engine braking. I don't know how much it would have slowed me down, got to a corner so had to stop experimenting. Forgot to try manual gears in EV mode, will try that tomorrow.
 
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