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Discussion Starter #1
I thought I'd share how I automated keeping track of my home charge sessions with my granny charger! I don't qualify for the OLEV grant and my car can only charge up to 3.7kw anyhow, so not a huge advantage for me either way.

However, I wanted to know how much I was spending so that I could keep track of it.

In order to do this, I've leveraged SmartThings, WebCore, Microsoft Power Automate (Flow), and Excel Online (using Onedrive Business in Office 365 E3). I'm an automation engineer, so of course I had to go a bit overboard, lol.

I have 2 basic things I'm tracking: individual charges and the total monthly cost. I clear the kwh counter at the beginning of each month when I add the total to my monthly spreadsheet table.

Individual Charge Tracking:

This data is all coming from an Aeon Labs wall plug (or generic clone) with power metering...

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This then goes into Microsoft Power Automate....

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Which finally sends the data into my spreadsheet...

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Monthly Cost Tracking:

Once again, start out in WebCore (using SmartThings data)...

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This is then picked up by Microsoft Power Automate (Flow)...

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And then finally into my excel sheet...

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As a bonus, I also created a virtual device that will set off my smartthings siren if someone were to cut the cable when I'm sleeping:

This basically updates the state of a virtual contact device, which is then monitored by SmartThings' Smart Home Monitor.

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Final note is that I had some issues lining up the variable names as Microsoft Power Automate doesn't like leading @ symbols in the JSON object... but I eventually managed to manually override the property names and it works. Also note: I've blanked out or anonymized all my personal URLs / file paths.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
What granny charger does it works with?
Literally any granny charger.

Just make sure you don't run beyond the capacity of the smart plug (presumably zwave or zigbee) that you are plugging through. I've now gotten a granny charger that I can set to lower amperage after melting the plug on my extension lead. (Yes, I knew from the beginning that 13amps over extended periods was probably going to result in this, but it did work for 2 months before I was forced into getting the replacement that can do 8/10amps).
 

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Discussion Starter #4
What granny charger does it works with?
Also if you are in France, you can probably get away with a higher charge rate than in the UK... it seems the fuses in our plugs cause them to warm up a bit faster!
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Also... this could probably be safely adapted to monitor a full-blown wall-mounted EVSE without built-in monitoring by using a heavy-duty current monitor.

If you used this device, you could go up to 40amps: Heavy duty Z-Wave switch for indoors & outdoors

You could probably go above that by using current monitoring clamps, but at that point, we are probably talking 3 phase power, and that's a whole other can of worms. ;)

Here's what I use:

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Nice work! I have a TP-Link smart plug with energy monitoring built-in. It has a web api which I've yet to play around with but I plan on keeping track of kWh used and monthly costs at some point.
 
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