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Discussion Starter #1
So after 1 week of owning a Model 3 AWD LR, and being very careful to only charge it to 80% at night, I'm now going on a long trip so I set the car to precondition for 9am with a 100% charge limit, expecting to see the range at 348 miles as per the advert and Tesla model specification for the long range.

But no, the range is only 308 miles at 100%.

Battery is only 7 days old so no degradation.

Why is the estimated range 40 miles less than the quoted range at 100%?
 

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As cah197 says -

The car stores kWh and they just convert that to miles using a fixed ratio, they’ve used the results of the US testing process to do so not the European. What you get in real life will be different again just like the mpg you got in a petrol car wouldn’t be the rated one.

The battery management system (BMS) can drift over time especially if the car never sits for longish periods of time (ie overnight) at a variety of states of charge but doubtful that’s what’s happening here.
 

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OP, sorry to pile on the bad news, but did you really think you had 348 miles car? Always? In all weather conditions?

@Jon G beat me to it...

Trying to be more helpful: my understanding is that Tesla also has a GOM style range? Use that. As random as it is, it is still better than a fixed number from a test experiment.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Because it’s based on a fixed value related to EPA range, not the WLTP quoted.
So why quote WLTP range figures on the website but show EPA figures on the display in the car? Surely they should use the same system in both places?
 

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There will always be some sort of guideline as to what a car is likely to achieve, but there will always be an element of averages in that. If you took your M3 around the Nurburgring for a good thrash, would you expect the same Miles per Kw than a gentle bimble around the town? No of course not. We all drive differently, some more gentle, some more aggressive. You cannot account for everyone. I pretty much bimble, cruise at 65, and am currently getting 5.6 mpkw. Someone who doesn't hang around may get less than 4. Big difference. What you get depends on how you drive
 

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So why quote WLTP range figures on the website but show EPA figures on the display in the car? Surely they should use the same system in both places?
The answer is simple; all car manufacturers are required by law to quote WLTP figures when advertising in the EU.

Within the car, they use the more realistic EPA range. It's an American car after all, and the US use the EPA range as their standard.
 

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WLTP and EPA aren't actually that far apart, some models of car have a higher WLTP figure, others have a higher EPA, both are far better than the NEDC figures we used to have in Europe. So bad Tesla used to use a "Typical" figure which was nearer the current figure (and older cars still have this), but then in America they used to have an "Ideal" figure which was the range when driving at 40 mph down hill with a tail wind...really crazy figure but it looked good

I think they'd save themselves a lot of grief if they used the rated metric in the appropriate region or gave the option to show kwh available (except peopel would say "my car is meant to have a 50kwh battery, why does it only have 43kwh when full?) or a proper range based on recent driving like the trip graph screen shows (except people would have a heart attack on a cold winters morning when 3 miles down the road they're told the car only has a range of 60 miles). Other makes of EV somehow manage to do it better
 

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Trying to be more helpful: my understanding is that Tesla also has a GOM style range? Use that. As random as it is, it is still better than a fixed number from a test experiment.
Many owners use % for the main battery indicator and refer to the Energy screen when considering potential mileage. The latter is configurable for different distances, averages and instant. It doesn't sound as if anything is wrong with your car at the moment; you will acquire a better feel for what it does in different weather, road conditions, driving style etc as time goes by. I think virtually everyone becomes much more comfortable as they gain experience with the car.
 

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I have had a LR AWD since August 2019. I hope this data gives you an indication of range you will achieve realistically . I don’t drive like miss Daisy and do a mix of motorway and town driving. The 8,000 to 10,000 miles is through the coldest part of last winter if charged to 100%. During the coldest weeks I think 260 miles is realistic. Through the warmer summer months 315 miles. Again, like ICE cars it depends also how you drive.
 

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I don't understand how that chart is expected to help. It seems to be showing the rated range which is the BMS reported figure and the drift downwards suggests you need to help the BMS calibration, but that aside its showing rated which we know is just a proxy for the available kwh in the battery, The colder weather does decrease the battery capacity a bit but thats not the primary issue in winter.

The realistic range depends on the efficiency and in winter that drops but I don't see how that comes across on that chart unless I'm missing something. Drive lots of shorter journeys in very cold weather and your range will be down as much as 40% against the rated range in winter as an example.
 

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I don't understand how that chart is expected to help. It seems to be showing the rated range which is the BMS reported figure and the drift downwards suggests you need to help the BMS calibration, but that aside its showing rated which we know is just a proxy for the available kwh in the battery, The colder weather does decrease the battery capacity a bit but thats not the primary issue in winter.

The realistic range depends on the efficiency and in winter that drops but I don't see how that comes across on that chart unless I'm missing something. Drive lots of shorter journeys in very cold weather and your range will be down as much as 40% against the rated range in winter as an example.
I don’t disagree with your comment. There are so many factors to consider when calculating how far you can go on a full charge. I was trying to demonstrate how the efficiency drops off in the colder months and how initially battery degregation is higher. Personally I took more of an interest in how far I can go compared to owning a ICE vehicle because I didn’t want the hassle of having to find a charger enroute. Doing a long journey in a EV involves planning. I found ‘a better route planner’ app to fit the bill. This is my first EV and will never go back to ICE but the rated range in most people’s eyes is roughly what you should expect to get as advertised. As you said cold short runs and reduce the range by 40%.
 
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