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Discussion Starter #1
Im having a wheel refurbished and new tyre fitted. Im wondering if the refurb and tyre change can be done and keep the original TMPS. I think the batteries on them are good for 10 years and the last one I bought was about £50 so I dont want to fork out if I dont need to.
Apart from the actual tyre change Im guessing the TPMS needs to be renewed for the refurb, or is there a way it can be removed and replaced after its done.
(I have kept this to the Ampera/Volt forum as I believe other cars may have a different system)
Thanks
 

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If it’s a sensor based system, then I’m not aware of one yet where they can’t be removed and replaced?

The tyre fitter or wheel refurb place should be able to remove it without breaking it, and then it can be refitted just before you fit your tyre back on.
 

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There are a number of us with cars sitting on new/ refurb wheels having had the paint peeling problem. I can not recall anyone having the TPMS changed, mine has the originals refitted, as far as I can make out they are part of the tyre valve.
 
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Discussion Starter #4
Spiny and Tooks thanks very much for the info. I had two wheels with bad Michelins and paint peeling, I bought a second hand wheel off EBay and had it refurbed, it didnt come with a valve so I had to buy one. The car picked up the sensor without any configuration ok. Had a new Goodyear fitted. Put it on yesterday and the Traction Control became a little sensitive. I now have another wheel to refurb and new Goodyear. Will then fit both Goodyears on one 'axle' which sould sort out the Traction Control. BTW I always thought best tyres should be on the front but I have read some people saying best on the rear. Doesnt make sense to me as the front takes the load when braking and also are drive wheels.
 

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They are self-learning TPMS (assuming you have the right model TPMS) with a design life of 10 years, and can be removed and refitted.

In theory there is a rubber seal at the base of the valve (locates inside rim) you should replace, you'd have to inspect and decide for yourself if that is required. Might be a good idea preventatively to avoid having to remove the tyre a second time.
 

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the back front argument, simply put if the backs are worse than the fronts and the front stops hard then the poor back tyres will try to overtake the front ones. result is facing the wrong way on the road.

Car tyres advice | AA
 
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Discussion Starter #7
the back front argument, simply put if the backs are worse than the fronts and the front stops hard then the poor back tyres will try to overtake the front ones. result is facing the wrong way on the road.

Car tyres advice | AA
Thanks very much @donald for the info on TPMS I will inspect the seal as you advise. Thanks @Spiny for explaining the tyre position, I can see the sense of the tyre location now you point it out. Disappointed that a lifelong belief I held was totally wrong.
 

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I also remember from years ago being told that new tyres were best put on the front, at least with front wheel drive cars. I will also have to amend my thinking!
 
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Without wishing to sound like a contrary mary, I think the AA advice is a bit outdated.

When you think that a modern front wheel drive cars front wheels do 80% of the braking, 100% of the accelerating and 100% of the steering, sometimes more than one at a time, then I know where I’d put my ‘best tyres’.

I think that advice also stems from your ‘average’ car driver being able to better control understeer than oversteer. However, I find the idea of going forwards or backwards into a tree, hedge, car or other obstacle equally unappealing.

Fortunately, cars with stability systems help you enormously when faced with emergency situations, but they can’t defy the laws of physics, which is why I always insist I have matching tyres in brand and tread pattern on all four corners even if the ones on the rear are older.
 

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When you think that a modern front wheel drive cars front wheels do 80% of the braking, 100% of the accelerating and 100% of the steering....
Seriously, are we going to repeat this thread again!!??

The rear wheels do 50% of the steering, just as the fronts do.

If you struggle to understand that then, with respect, there's no point in discussing it.

It is true of course than in a conventional car the front controls the steering, but this is like saying the flaps on an aeroplane provide the lift, because when you actuate the flaps you change the lift. In the same way if you are driving in a straight line you still need to steer in a straight line, and both front and rear are doing the same thing at that point. Only when you turn the wheel do you normally describe that as 'steering' but actually it is just tweaking what the wheels are already doing, which is preventing/constraining motion in the perpendicular direction.

The worst possible lack-of-control situation is where the rear wheels become unconstrained and move sideways. At this point it is called 'an accident'. If the fronts move sideways you just correct the steering.
 

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Seriously, are we going to repeat this thread again!!??

The rear wheels do 50% of the steering, just as the fronts do.

If you struggle to understand that then, with respect, there's no point in discussing it.

It is true of course than in a conventional car the front controls the steering, but this is like saying the flaps on an aeroplane provide the lift, because when you actuate the flaps you change the lift. In the same way if you are driving in a straight line you still need to steer in a straight line, and both front and rear are doing the same thing at that point. Only when you turn the wheel do you normally describe that as 'steering' but actually it is just tweaking what the wheels are already doing, which is preventing/constraining motion in the perpendicular direction.

The worst possible lack-of-control situation is where the rear wheels become unconstrained and move sideways. At this point it is called 'an accident'. If the fronts move sideways you just correct the steering.
Seriosuly, are you going to read my posts properly anytime soon or just continue to be argumentative for what sounds like the sake of it?

I used the 100% figure for steering to illustrate a point, I should have added initiating to that, and I note you have conveniently ignored the braking and accelerating parts of the same sentence. The front tyres in a modern front wheel drive car have a far harder life and have to cope with far more than the rears, check wear rates for that. Also, your engineering brain will know that a tyre has a finite amount of grip, and will have less latitude for assisting directional changes when it is also steering, braking or accelerating. You might think that the rear of a car becoming unconstrained is an ‘accident’, but then so is the front. I can’t imagine how knackered the rear tyres on a car would need to be for that to be a significant factor, but I’ve attended accidents where a car has scrubbed wide on a left handed bend and hit the poor bugger coming the other way head on, the tyre marks showing the desperate ‘simple steering correction’ the driver was trying to make.

The AA advice needs updating from the 1960s where it was conceived, probably by somebody called Paddy Hopkirk, who incidentally as a rally driver would never have put his only set of new tyres on the back of a front wheel drive car. Sorry to bring rally driving up, but it’s as relevant as aircraft flaps...

I know you seem to have a problem with me generally, so just move along if you disagree. Thanks.
 

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I did read your post, but accelerating and braking is not as important as losing control from loss of steering at the rear. There is no recovery possible at that point. You can crash on a completely empty road.

The AA advice is correct. Simple as. Nothing more to discuss.
 

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No, the AA advice is outdated and overly simplistic.

Would putting a new pair of ‘Wanchung Ditchfinders’ on your rear axle be automatically safer than leaving the part worn premium tyres on there?

I’m really surprised that you accept without question advice that if you really think about it cannot possibly be the best option in every circumstance...

As you say, probably nothing to discuss in that case.
 

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No, the AA advice is outdated and overly simplistic.

Would putting a new pair of ‘Wanchung Ditchfinders’ on your rear axle be automatically safer than leaving the part worn premium tyres on there?

I’m really surprised that you accept without question advice that if you really think about it cannot possibly be the best option in every circumstance...

As you say, probably nothing to discuss in that case.
You put your best tyres on the back, the ones which are most capable of retaining a perpendicular (cornering) load.

If you are saying that this hinges on an error declaring 'new' tyres go on the back, then I would tend to agree with you.

Irrespective of age or wear, one way or the other, the tyres most capable at cornering grip go on the back.
 

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But your grippieat tyres might not be the new ones? This is why I hate mixing brands and tread patterns, irrespective of age. I’ve been know to replace four tyres when I can’t get two new ones that match the other pair I’d be leaving on.

As for any advantage gained by having the tyres with most grip on the back, you can make an equal argument for having them on the front instead. For example, new tyres generally help a car stop more quickly, so the fronts would be best as that’s where most braking force can be applied. That could be the difference between an accident or not.

And that’s just one reason why I beliwe the advice is too simplistic and needs reviewing.

You think differently, which actually is fine by me.
 

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But your grippieat tyres might not be the new ones? This is why I hate mixing brands and tread patterns, irrespective of age. I’ve been know to replace four tyres when I can’t get two new ones that match the other pair I’d be leaving on.

As for any advantage gained by having the tyres with most grip on the back, you can make an equal argument for having them on the front instead.
I agree about the tyres and matching, but no the arguments are not equal. An ABS/stability system will control the car if the front wheels start sliding around, but if you lose the rear wheels then no control can recover them.

Basically, you are actually confirming the problem; if your fronts can stop quicker than your rears, where do the rears go? They will overtake the fronts whether you like it or not.....
 

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I agree about the tyres and matching, but no the arguments are not equal. An ABS/stability system will control the car if the front wheels start sliding around, but if you lose the rear wheels then no control can recover them.

Basically, you are actually confirming the problem; if your fronts can stop quicker than your rears, where do the rears go? They will overtake the fronts whether you like it or not.....
But, if we’re allowing stability systems now, then they will also try to control an oversteer. It does that by braking one of the front wheels, so the front right for a back end heading to the right etc.

What tyre would you want the most grip on then...?

As for no recovery possible from ‘losing the rear wheels’, a corrective steer and a boot full of throttle (in a front wheel drive car anyway) will do wonders.
 

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Newer tyres should be fitted in pairs to the rear axel, this is not something made up by the AA. It’s basic physics.

Exceptions to this rule are manufacturer says not to, or you run staggered width tyres.
 
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