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I think that's pretty impressive.
I look around my nearby streets with so many south/south-west facing roofs and wonder why there aren't more covered in panels. It's such a waste of potential resources.
 

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I am seeing more and more domestic installations happening where I live, on East and West facing roofs (as mine is) as well as South as still worthwhile. I appreciate there are upfront costs but so worthwhile in the long run, just make sure that you purchase quality products from a quality installer, do some homework first.
 

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I am not sure of the costs of the solar tiles that are coming on the market but I cannot see why planning permission is given for 4 bedroom and larger homes without solar tiles on the roof. I can understand if you building low cost homes at a low price but large homes it will be a drop in the ocean cost wise.
 

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I am not sure of the costs of the solar tiles that are coming on the market but I cannot see why planning permission is given for 4 bedroom and larger homes without solar tiles on the roof. I can understand if you building low cost homes at a low price but large homes it will be a drop in the ocean cost wise.
Even this doesn't necessarily make sense, people moving into low cost homes will benefit more from the free electricity than anyone else, and the developer could (I believe) keep the FIT payments for themselves if they liked, and put it into the purchase agreement. If it's a rental then the landlord could definitely keep the FIT payments!
 

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I agree if you look at it from a personal level but I was considering taking load off the grid, large roofs generate larger amounts of power.
 

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They should be mandatory on new build houses
Couldn't agree more. My (rented) house came with solar thermal, and the new houses behind mine have good sized solar pv, so it's happening, but this is a "premium" development so I guess not representative.

Still, even if it was legislated that 10% of new build must have them and ratchet up a few % per year it would make a huge difference. one day we'll have all 25 million homes with something on the roof, let's call it an average of 2.5kw because of flats/mansions. That's still 62.5 gigawatts, so on a sunny day will over produce the entire needs of the country. A little bit of storage from our V2G cars and we're all set for summer! Even if production is down to 25% in winter (is that realistic?) we have 15 gigawatts of the desired ~40gigawatts in daylight hours. So seasonal storage is needed, but I have also heard it gets windy in this country during winter....!
 

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Even this doesn't necessarily make sense, people moving into low cost homes will benefit more from the free electricity than anyone else, and the developer could (I believe) keep the FIT payments for themselves if they liked, and put it into the purchase agreement. If it's a rental then the landlord could definitely keep the FIT payments!
Near where I live, there is a new development on the old Gales Brewery site, among which is a block of affordable apartments, built for Guinness Trust, on the roof of which are 24 solar panels. I don't know how the electricity is used, but they're doing just as you suggest from the look of it.
 

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My brother in law is a planner and he summed this problem up as sustainability vs affordability apparently the dominant cost in house building is land prices so builders build cheap houses on expensive land. If more land was made available then the the margin generation would shift to the quality of the housing including full life costs.

I thought it was an interesting point.
 

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From my understanding the cost of land is driven up because the major housebuilders by up huge swathes speculatively and tactically to help create a false economy on that front. It seems the "self regulated" building industry is much like the oil industry in that they make massive profits, ever increasing, while asking for more and more subsidies and "help"... And UK.gov need houses built so hand over the reins and money to "stimulate the market" or whatever.

Seems very complex and quite shady all in all.
 

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What about the land banks held by the supermarket chains in locations where building a new superstore would be contrary to National Planning Policy Framework? That land could be released for housebuilding?

There's also a huge bank of extant permissions for new homes that have not yet been started.
 

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Again, they're not going to sell cheap. There's too much land owned by private co's who will squeeze the profits from it eventually either from the government to allow it to be built on or by building on it themselves eventually.
 

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Land is expensive because they have stopped making it.

All new developments generally have to meet Code 4 sustainability standards regardless of cost of housing, this tends to mean solar pv , so it's not true to say the developers are unregulated.
 

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Interesting report and amazing number of installations. Effectively one in 50 of all homes in uk have solar pv - which, if you rule out all flats, listed buildings etc makes for an impressive number.
However the report states that generation figures are estimated as there is no central register of pv generation. This is not true as all fit payments and meter reads are recorded by ofgem so accurate figures would be easy to come by.
 
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