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E-Niro 64kWh '4' since 9/20 (was Prius)
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve just trawled the utterly useless owner manual, and unless I’m very mistaken, it says nothing about the charging capabilities of the provided USB points. I’m just interested to know what is the 5V USB supply max power rating and does it support QC2 or QC3 fast charge utilising 5/9/12V switching etc. Has anyone seen the spec or managed to measure anything on this please? Thanks.
Peter
 

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Pretty sure it does not support fast charging, normally you only see this on Samsung phone chargers and type C.

Let me know if you don't find the answer, I have a USB power tester, tests voltage and you can present up to a 5 amp load, all with digital readout.

Greg
 

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I’ve just trawled the utterly useless owner manual, and unless I’m very mistaken, it says nothing about the charging capabilities of the provided USB points. I’m just interested to know what is the 5V USB supply max power rating and does it support QC2 or QC3 fast charge utilising 5/9/12V switching etc. Has anyone seen the spec or managed to measure anything on this please? Thanks.
Peter
I have a feeling there might be a difference between the USB charging points but have been unable to discover what. Have you found a difference between the USB charging point under the dashboard and the one in the central box?
 

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Yes, actually I have 3, the "mostly on" one in the center, the one to the right of it under the cover, and the one in the armrest.

I'm pretty sure the central one has a higher current limit.

If you want to know some more, why not install an app like Ampere (android) and then run your phone down, and then plug it into each of the 3 and at least get a relative indication of current supply... My phone will take up to 2 amps charging... I don't think it shows the supply voltage.

Greg
 

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E-Niro 64kWh '4' since 9/20 (was Prius)
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks. I’m going to conduct some tests when I get a bit of time. I’ll post my findings back here In due course. I just think it’s crazy that we have do do science experiments in order to discover info like this. It should have been clearly defined in the user manual, surely?

Peter
 

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Kia Soul EV 2020
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Thanks. I’m going to conduct some tests when I get a bit of time. I’ll post my findings back here In due course. I just think it’s crazy that we have do do science experiments in order to discover info like this. It should have been clearly defined in the user manual, surely?

Peter
I'm afraid, that this is only required if it varies from the standard USB specification.

You can understand that as in "the USB is 5V at 0.9A". :(

Let's hope that the charging (dedicated) one is more powerful, but I doubt it.
 

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E-Niro 64kWh '4' since 9/20 (was Prius)
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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)
I'm afraid, that this is only required if it varies from the standard USB specification.

You can understand that as in "the USB is 5V at 0.9A". :(

Let's hope that the charging (dedicated) one is more powerful, but I doubt it.
Hmm, but what is 'standard' anymore? Original USB spec in the 90's was easy, they were all rated at 5V with current limiting set at 500mA. Now USB has evolved somewhat and there are so many different flavours of USB specs, with different Voltages, Currents and of course data rates. Many USB outlets are now labelled with the ratings supported. This car should have been so IMO.

Anyway, I did some testing, my findings are.......

None of them appear to support QC 2/3. They are all fixed at 5V AFAIK. I used a QC 9V device to attempt Voltage increase trigger but no response obtained.

Front centre. (the active data port) Seems to maintain <3Amps. It cuts right off at 3.1Amps, and self resets after a few seconds.
Front right. (under the flap) can maintain <2Amps. Anything above that the Voltage sags fast.
Rear console box. can maintain <1.35Amps. Above that the Voltage sags fast.

So there it is. They’re apparently all a good bit different.
Tested on UK E-Niro 2020 version '4'. Of course these are maximum currents obtained in my tests on my car, though I expect they’ll all be pretty similar. So noticeably faster charging may possibly be obtained when using the centre front USB (Subject to the charge current limits set inside the device being charged).

Peter
 

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If you want to know some more, why not install an app like Ampere (android) and then run your phone down, and then plug it into each of the 3 and at least get a relative indication of current supply... My phone will take up to 2 amps charging... I don't think it shows the supply voltage.
Greg
Thanks for the suggestion of using Ampere.

I have tried this and all three USB sockets charge at approximately the same. My phone normally charges at just over 3 amps but the charge available from all the sockets was around 1.5 amps and the socket on the right under the dash was just 0.020 amps more than the other two sockets.
 

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E-Niro 64kWh '4' since 9/20 (was Prius)
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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
In your situation, your phone appeared to be charging it’s battery at the almost same rate in all 3 USB outlets. That is because you did not appear to be hitting the upper current limits of the individual USB outlets. Therefore, in your test, they would indeed all charge at the same rate.

The Ampere app attempts to measure current into or out of the battery inside the device. That is definitely not the same thing as measuring the actual current being delivered by the USB outlet. So please take those app readings with a large pinch of salt.
A variable portion of the USB delivered power is consumed by the device itself. Also, the actual battery charging current is controlled and limited dependant upon battery SOC, temperature etc etc. Furthermore, the 5V USB input Voltage is converted through a D.C./D.C. converter circuit (inside the device) to the appropriate Voltage and current required by the battery. So overall, this is a fairly complex interaction of variables.

To find the current limits of each USB outlet, I used a variable electronic D.C. load and gradually increased the load current whilst monitoring both the USB current and Voltage. So my measurements were not skewed or limited by what is going on inside an active device being charged. I measured the maximum each USB outlet is capable of delivering. However, those maximum values will quite often not be achieved in many circumstances. It is very dependant upon the circumstances within the device being charged or powered.

Peter
 

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Agreeed, Ampere is reading the current coming into the battery, you can try to subtract the "running current" of the phone (look at current draw when not charging) and then add that amount to the amount going into the battery.... I thought that was clear, but the biggest problem is that Ampere is not exact, as I have used an external device to read the true current.

You can buy these for cheap...

But Peter prawlin, you did it right, of course, I'm going to post your results on my FAQs page if you don't mind, you saved me from doing it myself. You also verified what my user experience suspected... too bad about not support higher voltages.

Greg
 
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