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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi all,
Tomorrow I'm going to have a look at & test drive of a 2018 Premium SE Ioniq.
I'm new to EVs - this will be the first I've ever driven!

I've done plenty of general EV research, but would appreciate any advice on what to look out for.
 

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The classic Ioniq 28 kWh model is pretty bulletproof over the specific EV parts of the car so you should just concentrate on the normal car buying aspects such as trim and body damage. As well as all of the normal car things like electric windows, wipers and washer. Drive close to an obstruction -back and front to test the proximity sensors.

Specifically, you will need to try out all of the EV controls to see that they work such as selecting all driving modes and all levels of regen using the flappy paddles. In particular, hold down the right-hand paddle for a second or so and experience the 'coast' feature where the car appears to be captured by a Startrek traction beam and is pulled along the road for an unfeasible distance before power is again needed. Then hold the left-hand paddle for a second or so to engage max regen and try out the one-pedal driving technique where you don't need the normal brake pedal at all as the regen regulates speed when you lift off.

Also, if possible, that the 'hold' feature and things like the adaptive cruise work. Seat and wheel heaters etc. But I would be surprised if you find any glitches. As I say, these cars appear to be pretty trouble-free over such things with hardly any mention of any common issues in forums.

I would also see if the dealer has the ability to demonstrate that the charging systems work and that the dash shows the correct available miles relative to the state of charge. Rule of thumb is that it should be showing between 1.2 and 1.3 miles per % of charge at these low temperatures. That is unless someone has been driving it hard over the last day or so that will force the estimate down. Even so, it should climb back to that kind of figure over a moderate drive period.

You should be seeing efficiency at between 4.0 and 4.5 miles per kWh on the display on a mix of urban, rural, and open road cautious test drive. Indeed, you may expect that figure to get to 5 miles/kWh if the test route is flat and low speed. Again, I would be surprised if it was much different to that and if so that would be grounds for questions to the vendor. These cars are incredibly efficient if driven sympathetically.

Good luck and please let us know here how you got on.
 

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The classic Ioniq 28 kWh model is pretty bulletproof over the specific EV parts of the car so you should just concentrate on the normal car buying aspects such as trim and body damage. As well as all of the normal car things like electric windows, wipers and washer. Drive close to an obstruction -back and front to test the proximity sensors.

Specifically, you will need to try out all of the EV controls to see that they work such as selecting all driving modes and all levels of regen using the flappy paddles. In particular, hold down the right-hand paddle for a second or so and experience the 'coast' feature where the car appears to be captured by a Startrek traction beam and is pulled along the road for an unfeasible distance before power is again needed. Then hold the left-hand paddle for a second or so to engage max regen and try out the one-pedal driving technique where you don't need the normal brake pedal at all as the regen regulates speed when you lift off.

Also, if possible, that the 'hold' feature and things like the adaptive cruise work. Seat and wheel heaters etc. But I would be surprised if you find any glitches. As I say, these cars appear to be pretty trouble-free over such things with hardly any mention of any common issues in forums.

I would also see if the dealer has the ability to demonstrate that the charging systems work and that the dash shows the correct available miles relative to the state of charge. Rule of thumb is that it should be showing between 1.2 and 1.3 miles per % of charge at these low temperatures. That is unless someone has been driving it hard over the last day or so that will force the estimate down. Even so, it should climb back to that kind of figure over a moderate drive period.

You should be seeing efficiency at between 4.0 and 4.5 miles per kWh on the display on a mix of urban, rural, and open road cautious test drive. Indeed, you may expect that figure to get to 5 miles/kWh if the test route is flat and low speed. Again, I would be surprised if it was much different to that and if so that would be grounds for questions to the vendor. These cars are incredibly efficient if driven sympathetically.

Good luck and please let us know here how you got on.
WOW, what a brilliant reply. I think we sometimes forget that one of the great things about this forum is helping people out. When I came here before ordering my first EV, I didn't know anything and asked every silly question you could imagine.... everything. Now we have our 4th EV and are 100% EV at home.

So, this is just to recognise a great reply. The only other thing to add is that the car has a 5 year warranty, so as long as this is done: "Ensure that the vehicle is serviced in accordance with the manufacturer’s specified service schedule ensuring genuine Hyundai supplied parts are fitted." major issues should be fine.
 

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ACC in 2018 Ioniq is a fairly old fashioned radar only system, whereas I believe newer models got the Kona/Niro system which uses cameras to detect cut-ins etc. Same with the “autosteer” - if it’s labelled “active LKAS” it’s an older system with no traffic follow in the absence of lines, and NO DISENGAGE NOISE, so good luck with that. Newer systems used the term “LFA”.
 
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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I am now the proud owner of a white Ioniq BEV!
I drove it 110 miles back from the dealers. It actually looked as though it would make it, but decided to do my first rapid charge en route. It was an Instavolt unit, very easy to do apart from a bit of trouble getting the car into position. The cable didn't seem very long & was on the opposite side of the charger to my car socket.. It was also dark which didn't help.
Thank you for your help especially @Hitstirrer.
 

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I am now the proud owner of a white Ioniq BEV!
I drove it 110 miles back from the dealers. It actually looked as though it would make it, but decided to do my first rapid charge en route. It was an Instavolt unit, very easy to do apart from a bit of trouble getting the car into position. The cable didn't seem very long & was on the opposite side of the charger to my car socket.. It was also dark which didn't help.
Thank you for your help especially @Hitstirrer.
Great. And thanks for the update. Your Instavolt experience is normal. They tend to come in pairs of course and the trick is to reverse into the first bay and use the plug from the second unit. Then hope that nobody else turns up. Or, park as far on the left of either bay as possible - certainly with wheels on the left white line or beyond if possible so that the cable will reach round to the Ioniq socket. But of course you have already discovered that. Later Instavolt units have a swivelling top to allow both cables to reach either side, which rectifies that annoying issue for many cars. See image.

143592
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Great. And thanks for the update. Your Instavolt experience is normal. They tend to come in pairs of course and the trick is to reverse into the first bay and use the plug from the second unit. Then hope that nobody else turns up. Or, park as far on the left of either bay as possible - certainly with wheels on the left white line or beyond if possible so that the cable will reach round to the Ioniq socket. But of course you have already discovered that. Later Instavolt units have a swivelling top to allow both cables to reach either side, which rectifies that annoying issue for many cars. See image.

View attachment 143592
That certainly looks better. I was also wondering why they don't have a parallel park style layout like petrol stations? Perhaps because the Leaf has the socket in the nose?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Next thing to organize is a charger.
I'm leaning towards an Ohme unit. I'm not clear if it will read the current state of charge on my Ioniq?
I'm thinking of using "Smart Home Charge" to install it - anyone used them, or have better suggestions?
I'm in Somerset if that's relevant.
Thank you.
 

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Life's too short to wait for a Kona .....
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Next thing to organize is a charger.
I'm leaning towards an Ohme unit. I'm not clear if it will read the current state of charge on my Ioniq?
I'm thinking of using "Smart Home Charge" to install it - anyone used them, or have better suggestions?
I'm in Somerset if that's relevant.
Thank you.
I have the same age Ioniq, and happen to have a ‘dumb’ Podpoint which is absolutely fine, and can be now used as a smart charger on their new app. I have seen good and bad about Ohme, but nothing to put me off them (about to move house so need to buy something). What I will say, depending on your circumstances, the Ioniq has perfectly adequate onboard charge settings...I have mine set up to charge between midnight and 4am on 7kw=28kw, so still a full charge if ‘empty’. This version 1.0 method may be all you need...if on Octopus Go tariff, that’s at 5p per kw, so damned cheap:). See link below if you need to use. £1.40 for a full tank suits me anyway. Only thing to consider with smart solutions like Ohme and Zappi etc, is that if your WiFi drops out, some(not all) can fail to charge. Not a scenario that’s likely to happen, but just to consider (I prefer simplest solutions but everybody has different likes and priorities). Enjoy the car...mines a keeper.
share.octopus.energy/alive-mink-412
 
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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
@IoniqHugh I've been with Octopus for a year or so on their standard fixed tariff. I have now switched to Octopus Go.
I believe the Ohme charger uses a mobile signal rather than WiFi which may be good for me. I don't think Octopus Agile would work for me. So far I'm very happy with the Ioniq.
 

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Next thing to organize is a charger.
I'm leaning towards an Ohme unit. I'm not clear if it will read the current state of charge on my Ioniq?
I'm thinking of using "Smart Home Charge" to install it - anyone used them, or have better suggestions?
I'm in Somerset if that's relevant.
Thank you.
The Ohme app will read the current state of charge of the car (mine's a 2020 Ioniq) but it's not very reliable (the app, that is). Sometimes it communicates without any issues; sometimes it times out, claiming that the car can't be reached. The BlueLink app successfully connects to the car every time so I know it's the Ohme app. This is a minor problem, though, since I can get the same info from BlueLink.

Yes, the Ohme uses a mobile signal rather than WiFi so make sure you've got coverage where you want to put the charger.

I used Smart Home Charge and I have no complaints at all. One caveat: they subcontract the installation work.
 

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Next thing to organize is a charger.
I try to keep out of the wall box debate as there are so many variables that make the selection of model and features highly personal. But I would mention that I recommend deep thought over the tethered or socket choice of whichever unit you choose. Over this aspect, I do have strong opinions and I always recommend a tethered unit as a loose cable can soon become deeply irritating in use. So much so that many people who chose a socket version of a wall box eventually end up buying a second type 2 to type 2 cable as they leave one permanently plugged into the wall socket and carry the second one around with them. They then have to cobble together some form of security for the loose cable to simulate the tethered unit that they regret not fitting in the first place.
 

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Life's too short to wait for a Kona .....
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I try to keep out of the wall box debate as there are so many variables that make the selection of model and features highly personal. But I would mention that I recommend deep thought over the tethered or socket choice of whichever unit you choose. Over this aspect, I do have strong opinions and I always recommend a tethered unit as a loose cable can soon become deeply irritating in use. So much so that many people who chose a socket version of a wall box eventually end up buying a second type 2 to type 2 cable as they leave one permanently plugged into the wall socket and carry the second one around with them. They then have to cobble together some form of security for the loose cable to simulate the tethered unit that they regret not fitting in the first place.
This is a good point...and I agree with this being a potential issue as I went with untethered and then bought a second lead, mainly because of regularity of putting in a wet, and sometimes dirty lead back into the boot. I probably will go tethered in the new house if I can store it tidily enough....choices choices....
By the way, some useful information available on youtube about Rolec chargers, that although cheap and cheerful, appear to be particularly unreliable, and burn out a lot...doesn't look like a choice for you anyway, but others might be looking too. I discounted this particular make.
 

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The item that fails on Rolecs is the RCBO. It's a £25 job to diy swap that for a decent item, and you then have a simple EVSE that can be maintained & repaired by anyone happy to swap out electrical items. No PCB to fail, as found in Podpoints & most other EVSEs. But the plastic case isn't the worlds toughest item, so if you want a diy repairable item, but with solid metal case & top quality components throughout, look at a Viridian on ecoharmony.co.uk . You can use a Viridian ECU (brains controller module) to replace a broken Rolec ECU, if that fails, and it's a cheaper & more versatile item as well. I have one in my Rolec, 'coz the car developed a short circuit in the charge port when damp got in, and this blew up the Rolec ECU connected by low-voltage 12V wire that got fed 240V. £85 to replace with Viridian equivalent.

We've seen people in here with broken EVSEs being quoted £400 or more for repairs by the mfr, and the best fix we're finding is sending them off to Martin at evbitz.uk who rebuilds these for <£200. Guess what, he bins the PCBs and puts a Viridian EVU in, an RCBO/RCD, a contactor or two, an over-temperature cutout, job done. You end up effectively with a Rolec/Viridian clone. There's a lot to be said for this simple modular approach used in Viridian, Rolec, and OpenEVSE designs.
 

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Earlier I said that I normally don't get involved in advice over EVSE wall boxes but have to say that I concur with @HandyAndy there. My own preference has always been to avoid complicated units and opt for simple units that are equally simple to fix once they're out of warranty.

I realise that some people prefer to spend megabucks on an all singing all dancing unit that enables them to micro manage and time shift charging and prices by the half hour with an aim to reduce the Kw price from 14p to 5p. The payback time by saving 9p per unit is around 36,000 miles driven. I prefer to keep the excess cash between a simple unit and a pretty and sophisticated unit in my own control. And at the same time avoid the umpteen hours of plotting and planning involved in achieving those savings. But then again I have always been a fan of the KISS principle.
 

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Earlier I said that I normally don't get involved in advice over EVSE wall boxes but have to say that I concur with @HandyAndy there. My own preference has always been to avoid complicated units and opt for simple units that are equally simple to fix once they're out of warranty.

I realise that some people prefer to spend megabucks on an all singing all dancing unit that enables them to micro manage and time shift charging and prices by the half hour with an aim to reduce the Kw price from 14p to 5p. The payback time by saving 9p per unit is around 36,000 miles driven. I prefer to keep the excess cash between a simple unit and a pretty and sophisticated unit in my own control. And at the same time avoid the umpteen hours of plotting and planning involved in achieving those savings. But then again I have always been a fan of the KISS principle.
Good advice. I guess we agree....I just use the onboard facility on the Ioniq but won’t pass up on the 5p as it still meets the KISS test!
I think I need to revisit potential Rolec/Viridian chargers based on @HandyAndy has shared. It fits my preference to a dumb charger if I can find a reliable one. Never had a problem with Podpoint mind, but may have just been lucky. Hopefully the OP now has some good ideas to consider (got a great car which is a good starting point)
 

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I'd just add a mention that the electrical regs for EVSEs got tightened up recently, and new ones now have to have extra earthing protection in. As my Rolec was about 3 years older than the regs, it lacked this, so I decided to upgrade it to latest spec with all the bells & whistles. I used Viridian's latest ECU which understands this stuff, added in the 2nd Contactor needed to isolate the Earth (as I don't have a ground rod, and car is outdoors when being charged), plus the extra (optional but wise-to-have surely) 6mA DC leakage testing gizmo that Viridian sell alongside their latest ECU. Managed to squeeze all this into my Rolec case. Cost of parts was £250.

There are some whizzy RCBOs/RCDs that may do this DC leakage test, so possibly I overdid the components, and it may be possible to arrange a different set of items to achieve the same end. But I found it easiest to simply follow Viridian's excellent wiring diagrams, rather than spend days analysing & researching to the nth degree. Anyone with an ancient Rolec or even a broken other-make can do the same, and it's exactly the same process that Martin uses to repair broken EVSEs from what I've seen of his repairs. Here's the link to my own efforts.
Rolec Dumb Charger upgraded with DC Leakage Protection...
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Good advice. I guess we agree....I just use the onboard facility on the Ioniq but won’t pass up on the 5p as it still meets the KISS test!
I think I need to revisit potential Rolec/Viridian chargers based on @HandyAndy has shared. It fits my preference to a dumb charger if I can find a reliable one. Never had a problem with Podpoint mind, but may have just been lucky. Hopefully the OP now has some good ideas to consider (got a great car which is a good starting point)
Yes, plenty of food for thought.
 
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