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I live on a new estate where installation of home chargers is not possible, and in the area west of Brighton which was a public charger desert. Despite this I was attracted by the half price leasing offers for the BMW I3 four years ago, and arranged with Chandlers of Portslade, about 5 miles from home, to use their bank of 7kw chargers. After my 2 year lease finished I decided that, although I loved driving the car, giving up about 6 hours once a week to charge the car outweighed the benefits, and changed to a Yaris hybrid. However, I was impressed by the recent What Car award for the new Renault Zoe, and had another look at my local Zap Map, and found both a home charger listed as available just round the corner from my house, plus the installation of a Shell Rapid at a garage on the edge of town. My current lease ends in about a years time.
I’ve contacted the house owner of the home charger, who tells me he would be happy to allow me to use his charger during the day, when he’s normally at work, whereas I’m retired. He hadn’t decided on what to charge, but I wondered if 15p per kw would be about the going rate. The Shell rapid Is 34p per kw, which seems a bit steep, but I suppose you have to expect to pay a premium for a Rapid charge. I thought I would need this back up for the inevitable days when my neighbour is at home during the day, or when I was short of time.

Is anyone else relying on a good neighbour for their charging, and are there any pitfalls?

Any thoughts on either of the charging rates?
 

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They probably can't reliably see how much power you're using in each charge, so paying per kWh probably isn't going to work so well other than guess work.

Id probably just work out how much a full charge would cost on an average tariff (bearing in mind their power is likely cheaper off peak and more expensive during the day when you'll be using it) and then round it up and put a little extra on top if you want to sweeten the deal for them.

If you're working on the cost of a full charge that's an incentive for you to plug in with as low of a battery charge as possible and go to full, meaning you're visiting their house as little as possible.

Remember to come up with alternative plans too. Your neighbours circumstances may change. They may simply change their mind. Or they may move away. If you can't charge there anymore is there an alternative? Are you happy to pay Shell prices every time? What if the Shell charger breaks down? Could you maybe charge at home with an extension cable and a cable cover/ramp over it on the path outside? Have you considered contacting the council to see if they could help with a solution?

If your local area is as bad as you say for public charging, you're taking quite a risk. While I understand your desire to go back to electric, your best option for now may be to look into PHEV, or picking up a used i3 Rex unless more charging options become available.
 

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Cool niebours are cool.
Maybe he has a Zappi? You get metering for free then.
Councils should have a process off installing cable drains(at owners cost obviously). I think the Goverment should get some guidance in place.
 

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It entirely depends on what he's paying for his power (for price) and what chargepoint he has (for metering).

I think 15p per kWh would likely be his daytime incremental cost for power. I think mine's currently 14.8p, so it depends on if you feel you should be contributing to things like the installation cost of the chargepoint, standing charges, or even just paying a penny or two extra because he's being a good neighbour.

If you do do it per kWh, be sure you're taking numbers from the chargepoint or his electricity meter, and not what the car reports going into the battery. There are losses in the charging process from AC (10-20%) and if you don't account for this he'll end up out of pocket. A number of the smart chargepoints will show the energy used on an app or web page. Mine shows it on a little LCD on the chargepoint (as well as a web interface).

If accurate metering is tricky, it might be better to agree a fixed price per 25% of battery (or something similar). A new Zoe is apparently 52kWh capacity. So 25% would be 13kWh. Add on 2.5kWh of charging losses and you're at 15.5kWh. 15.5 * 15p is £2.32 for 25% charge.

Or, do it by time. Maximum rate is ~7.6kW, so every hour would be 7.6 * 15p, or about £1.15.

Basically, make sure that whatever you agree he doesn't end up losing money for being a good neighbour.
 

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Get one of those wireless clip on Electricity meters, and put it round the live or neutral chargepoint lead in the fusebox.
 

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I think Scott 20p per unit then a little more for the inconvenience. I give my neighbour £5 for s as partial charge overnight just because I’m glad of the chance for my leaf to try and balance its battery.

Im a doctor who sometimes works at Brighton hospital and I’m currently looking into drive way renting, you can pay daily or monthly and some driveways in Brighton and Hove include charging!

I worked it out that even if I use only the shell rapids, it’s still half my weekly petrol cost!
 

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I didn't realise thepoint made about only reselling electricity at cost made by Ian. Charge points installed with OLEV grants have some form of metering - either a simple meter or via an APP - so that it is certainly possible to directly charge for it. The alternative is to just charge based upon time which allows the owner to make a profit if they wish - it is more a matter of the complexity that people are willing to go to.
Being tight I'm not sure that I'd want to pay more than £1/hour for parking even if it came with free electricity as that would be close to £10/day for me, but I have the luxury of being able to charge at home and hence can use cheap off-peak electricity.
I can see this sort of arrangement becoming more common, particularly when it combines with parking for commuters.
 

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Question I have is why can't you get a home charger installed?

And why not use a granny lead at home instead overnight?
 

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In the future it will be a requirement but a previous Government took away the requirement for parking places on new developments so there will be lots of people in a similar situation.
There are also side benefits for the driveway owner - having someone popping around randomly during the day is an effective burglar deterrent.
 

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Reselling of electricity must be made at the same cost as the purchaser pays. Might be worth a read of this.
Interesting, but this is really consumer protection to stop landlords and such-like not making mark-ups on electricity, and there's quite a lot of wiggle room for estimating prices given imprecise metering and/or variable electricity costs.

As long as no-one is profiteering on the resale (and I really doubt an agreement between two neighbours is going to end up with that situation) then I don't see why anyone should fall foul of this. OP would have to file a complaint against his neighbour who is helping him out.
 

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Reselling of electricity must be made at the same cost as the purchaser pays. Might be worth a read of this.
Interesting, it says "person" so I take it this doesn't apply to businesses profiting from their chargers?
 

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I explored doing this as my charger sits idle all day, i.e. I am the neighbour in your scenario. I decided against it because of the issues around reselling electricity. They don't want people acting as mini electricity supply companies. But if your neighbour did go ahead then in addition to the tariff you have to add on a share of the standing charge, the green levy and VAT at the reduced rate. Then you need to add some more to compensate the neighbour for the whole hassle of doing this, i.e. the admin cost of running this mini business, or else why do it. Its one thing to help someone with a one-off emergency charge, something else altogether for a daily top-up.
 

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Charge a tenner a week for parking with unmetered access to the charger (within reason).
 

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That document is designed to protect tennants etc and enforcement is only via the aggrieved party complaining. I'm pretty sure it's a red herring here.
 

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Consider 15p as standard price per kWh. Make that 20p after you include the losses from charging. Round that up to the nearest pound each time you charge. Add to that some thanks to a really nice neighbor in your own way, whether it's cooking dinner, offering a pint, or making their portrait with pasta.
 

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I can’t see how the electric resale rules would apply, for the same reason as Source London are not caught - you are supplying the use of a powered charger, not just electricity. “Person” generally means a legal person, so including a company; where the meaning is human beings statutes say “individual”.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
Many thanks for all your replies, much food for thought there.
I have an allocated parking space outside my house, but across a well used pavement. It is of course illegal to run a cable over a pavement, and although I might myself be occasionally tempted to do so, my very safety conscious wife would not allow it. No charging point installers would agree an installation in such circumstances.
It would of course be my intention that my neighbour was fully compensated for his kindness. I assume he placed his home installation on Zap Map because he wanted more use to be made of it.
I’ve got the rest of this year for further thought before I have to make an order.
 
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