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Discussion Starter #1
Hi - can anyone speak to the availability of the usual assortment of BEVs throughout the UK? Are all BEvs available at virtually all dealers throughout the country, or are there notable limitations?

In the US, a BEV may be for sale in California, but this far from guarantees that it will be for sale in many states and at many dealerships. Two examples for the moment are that the Kona EV and the Niro EV are not for sale in some parts of the country. Even when good BEVs are for sale, the deals on those vehicles may be less attractive than in California or a few of the other areas.
 

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Given that the UK is smaller than most states there isn't usually much geographical difference except in thinly populated areas like the Scottish Highlands.
Availability at the individual level is usually down to if there is a dealer for the manufacturer nearby and what their attitude is for what they sell.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Given that the UK is smaller than most states there isn't usually much geographical difference except in thinly populated areas like the Scottish Highlands.
Availability at the individual level is usually down to if there is a dealer for the manufacturer nearby and what their attitude is for what they sell.
Thanks, this makes sense. During ZEV round one, around 1997-2003, it was pretty obvious that the automakers were failing to make the vehicles available at more than a handful of dealerships, mostly in California, but a few in other states. They also kept a lid on sales by usually refusing to sell them at all (with a few end-of-program exceptions they were leased, not sold) and I suppose there might have been other measures that I've forgotten.

Scroll ahead to today, and the measure outright-refusal-to-sell is not employed as often (though I think still sometimes), but the only-for-sale-in-some-states supply limitation and inconvenience and expense is still very much there for some of the vehicles.

A quick list of the limitations that constrain the sales of the longer-range BEVs in the US:

  • Kona EV: not available in many states
  • Niro EV not available in many states
  • Bolt: aside from inventory supply limitations I've seen happen, there is the question of the fact that some dealerships will not sell it (they are not outfitted to do so, including the dealership 10 miles away), and the fact that it is positioned as a practical somewhat spacious econocar at around $40k msrp, in a country that is not particularly into that type of vehicle at that price, versus the better-handling more-powerful legitimate entry level luxury positioning of the Model 3.
  • Leaf: it has developed a reputation for battery degradation (and related depreciation) in hotter areas. Also, it cannot be road-tripped as readily due to rapidgate. Also, my limited understanding is that it also is simply not in the same league as the Model 3.
So: what will be the first non-Tesla under-$50k long-range new-vehicle BEV widely and readily available for purchase in the US without any of the above limitations? Have I missed it?
 

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Renault ZOE R135 ZE50 GTLine July 2020 (Sold: R90 ZE40 i Dynamic Nav June 2017)
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One issue for the US is that global warming doesn't exist in some of it apparently (around the White House?). In contrast, legislation in Europe (as in California I believe) is penalising manufacturers with excess fleet emissions. As a result, Hyundai and Kia are diverting the Kona and e-Niro to Europe (and presumably California etc.) to meet fleet emissions targets and avoid large penalities.
 

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Renault ZOE R135 ZE50 GTLine July 2020 (Sold: R90 ZE40 i Dynamic Nav June 2017)
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The US and EU EV markets are very different at present. Data for plug-in EVs (including hybrids) below from EV-Volumes - The Electric Vehicle World Sales Database. US seems to be flat this year, with EV sales at about 2% of total sales. EU looks as though it will have reached 4% to 6% of sales towards the end of 2019. Tesla make over half of sales in the US (so seem very dominant from there) whereas they make less than 25% of sales in the EU, although growing strongly with the Model 3. But that is a big car for many European cities and competes with the like of a 50kWh Renault Zoe (about £25k for a top end model on the road) compared to about £40k for a Model 3 SR+ on the road in the UK.

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You need to remember that the whole of the UK is smaller than many individual US states. For example, Alaska is seven times as big as the UK, Texas is three times the size, and California is nearly double the size. There are some regional differences between the countries that make up the UK, but mostly it's treated as a single territory for availability of goods and services.
 

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But has a population of about 75,000.
In many ways California is close to European states with 40 million-ish, though still over a larger area, and similar environmental attitudes.
Just wish we could have their climate :) ... sometimes.
...and Tesla ship around half of their production to the US - the majority to California. So there’s a supply issue for BEVs.

The real step change will be the introduction of electric trucks (pickups) as these are a significant source of pollution in the US.
 

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UK versus USA, as others already pointed out, may not be the best representation, but EU vs USA probably yes. Eastern European countries definitely don't have EVs available in as much diversity and number as Western Europe (purchasing power is much lower in Eastern Europe).

UK is special also because their steering wheels are positioned differently (although on the right side) and for some car manufacturers this small issue may delay the availability of their cars from between 3 months (Renault) to 1 year (Tesla).

I believe Western Europe (Norway/Switzerland/France/Germany/Netherlands) would be the areas with the largest assortment of EVs available, whereas Bulgaria/Romania/Hungary... yeah, I don't think they have statistics on this.
 

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UK is special also because their steering wheels are positioned differently (although on the right side) and for some car manufacturers this small issue may delay the availability of their cars from between 3 months (Renault) to 1 year (Tesla).
Not that special - there are plenty of other countries that have the wheel on the right. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Thanks for the responses. The points about the smaller more population-dense geography make sense. I suppose even if an automaker wanted to play some games as to availability, it would be harder in a market where a buyer can simply go nearby to another dealer. I don't know roughly how many folks here have a sense of how long, and to what extent, these games have been going on in the US.

I wish there were something like a 50 kWh Renault widely available for sale here, though it would be hard to say if it would miss on some points (especially battery cooling and related DCFC).
 

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Thanks for the responses. The points about the smaller more population-dense geography make sense. I suppose even if an automaker wanted to play some games as to availability, it would be harder in a market where a buyer can simply go nearby to another dealer. I don't know roughly how many folks here have a sense of how long, and to what extent, these games have been going on in the US.

I wish there were something like a 50 kWh Renault widely available for sale here, though it would be hard to say if it would miss on some points (especially battery cooling and related DCFC).
FYI - the 50kW Zoe as supplied in Europe has air-cooled batteries, and an optional 50kW DC charging module.
 

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I ordered the egolf in December, arrives in a few weeks. The dealer had a couple ready to go including the shop floor vehicle which had some options but not the ones I need. At the time the wait was two months but it’s much longer now, it’s looking like 16 weeks. With the Chinese factory shutdowns and europe about to start closing up, I’m hoping the wait isn’t much longer
 
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