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For our third statistics release we’re going to focus on November, and we’ll see the impact of the first month of GMT and dropping temperatures. It's hard to avoid extra energy usage during the winter months, and that’s where V2G will be particularly effective in balancing the grid.

Once again, and of particular interest for those who guessed a total export figure - the closest guess will be revealed later in this post!

To give clarity and provide information on our V2G trial, we’re releasing these stats and only include units which were installed for the whole of November.

Another 35 trialists joined in November and, if you’re one of them and reading this now, welcome and thank you for helping us develop and understand energy solutions of the future! Installs have continued through November, with more than 150 V2G units installed since the trial began.

Note: When looking at the following figures, it’s worth remembering that totals include solar exports, as we’re paying 26p/kWh for solar exports in addition to the V2G exports.

The figures make for interesting reading. As the nights draw in, the effectiveness of solar panels during the evening begins to drop, and the demands from your own home begins to increase as lights are turned on.

Maximums

As a collective, our trialists exported 17,126 kWh of energy - enough energy to power a Nissan LEAF for over 70,000 miles!

The highest individual export from one of trialists was 552 kWh. The total export credit was an amazing £161.39!

The maximum non-solar trialist export was 463kWh, and this resulted in an export credit of £156.18!

Averages

For balance, the average export payment for our solar trialists was £80, and £71 for non-solar trialists. That’s £960 and £852 a year respectively!

The averages again demonstrated that, even with daylight hours reducing, the benefits of solar pay off when exporting: Our solar average was 274Wh, and the non-solar average export was 208kWh.

With an answer of 16,666kWh, our trialist Denzil submitted the closest prediction in our “Guess the Export” competition, and they will be the recipient of a £50 voucher!

If you have a LEAF and would like to speak to the team, find out more about the trial or get an insight into the potential benefits that V2G could give to you, visit www.ovoenergy.com/v2g , email [email protected] or call 0330 102 7423.

OVO Energy
 

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Hi

interesting stuff. I have some queries

1. Is it true ovo are buying sse energy (gas and electric)
2. Do other energy providers offer money for giving energy back when they want?
3. Is the majority of electric infrastructure for housing able to ‘export’ energy? Sorry if I’m asking something too basic here. I’m familiar with systems where it’s either one or both directions. I’d like to understand how the electric physically exports from the house to it goes next.
4. Are you in partnership with the national grid in order to help even out demand?

thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Hi

interesting stuff. I have some queries

1. Is it true ovo are buying sse energy (gas and electric)
2. Do other energy providers offer money for giving energy back when they want?
3. Is the majority of electric infrastructure for housing able to ‘export’ energy? Sorry if I’m asking something too basic here. I’m familiar with systems where it’s either one or both directions. I’d like to understand how the electric physically exports from the house to it goes next.
4. Are you in partnership with the national grid in order to help even out demand?

thanks.
1) Details on OVO Energy and SSE can be found here: https://www.ovoenergy.com/ovo-and-sse

2) Some energy suppliers offer export tariffs, mainly aimed at people with solar or other micro-generation. These tend to be at the level of 4-5p/kWh. No other energy suppliers offer an export rate as high as 30p/kWh - which we can offer because our Kaluza platform can intelligently choose the times to export.

3) Yes, the majority of domestic electric infrastructure is able to accommodate energy being exported back to the grid. You just have to notify / request permission from your local Distribution Network Operator (DNO). Whilst it works slightly differently, you can think of the flow of electric power just like the flow of water or gas. If the home is generating more electricity than it's using, the excess power flows out back onto the grid for use elsewhere.

4) Kaluza, the smart platform that operates our smart charging and V2G hardware, is in conversations with both National Grid and the DNOs about providing services to help even out demand. We are engaged in trials such as the UKPN Shift project (link: https://www.current-news.co.uk/news/ukpn-to-launch-trial-into-scalability-of-ev-smart-charging) that are already doing this.
 
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