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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi,

I just got a home charger installed. I've dealt with a cowboy electrician before, so I'm trying to be extra careful about getting the right paperwork, but I'm finding it hard to determine what that should be exactly.

The company that did the install is registered with NICEIC – I've confirmed this on electricalcompetentperson.co.uk.

They have now emailed a "Domestic Electrical Installation Certificate".

Questions:

1. Is an emailed copy enough or do I need a signed scan or even signed original? The emailed copy has names but no signatures.

2. The name "For the DESIGN, the CONSTRUCTION, and the INSPECTION AND TESTING of the installation:" is not to my knowledge the name of the young man installing the charger. No one from the company came to my house other than the guy doing the install. I'm wondering if this means that they're having a registered electrician signing off on a non-registered junior electrician's work or something, without actually seeing it. Is that something to just accept as the way it's sometimes done, or is it worth raising with them? On a side note, I can't find the name that signed it on electricalcompetentperson.co.uk, but perhaps it's enough that the company shows up?

3. Should I also expect a "Building Regulations Certificate of Compliance"? I assume I could verify that one via NICEIC Online Certification when/if it's issued? They haven't mentioned one yet but I planned on asking for one. I can't figure out whether one is needed or not if the electrician is competent and can self-certify.
 

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It's getting increasingly common for companies to be members of a Part P body, not their staff or sub-contractors. I met someone from one of the fairly big electrical contractors a few weeks ago, doing some remedial work on a house I'd done an EICR on a while ago (the owners asked me over for a cup of tea whilst the chap was there). Nice enough lad, ex-army and part way through doing an adult learner route into the trade. He was under a year in, just done his 2365, so maybe a couple of years away from being qualified.

To be fair, his work looked fine, but he wasn't happy about doing Part P work on his own, with his boss signing off his work without seeing it. My view was that his boss was taking the piss, as he seemed to be charging normal rates for someone that was earning a pretty low wage, because they were, in effect, an adult apprentice.

My guess is that some of the companies installing charge points are probably doing the same, sending out semi-skilled people to do work under the umbrella of the companies membership of a scheme. Tough for a properly qualified electrician to compete with companies cutting corners like this.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you, @Jeremy Harris! FWIW the guy who did the work seemed to know his stuff, but he did seem young.

So do I understand you correctly that this is a bit of a grey area - not completely by the book but also not necessarily something to worry about?
 

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Needn't be anything to worry about, as it seems you've got an EIC. Sadly, there are installers around that aren't giving customers a copy of the EIC, which isn't good practice, IMHO. The fact that you've been given a copy tends to suggest they are probably OK.
 

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Hi,

I just got a home charger installed. I've dealt with a cowboy electrician before, so I'm trying to be extra careful about getting the right paperwork, but I'm finding it hard to determine what that should be exactly.

The company that did the install is registered with NICEIC – I've confirmed this on electricalcompetentperson.co.uk.

They have now emailed a "Domestic Electrical Installation Certificate".

Questions:

1. Is an emailed copy enough or do I need a signed scan or even signed original? The emailed copy has names but no signatures.

2. The name "For the DESIGN, the CONSTRUCTION, and the INSPECTION AND TESTING of the installation:" is not to my knowledge the name of the young man installing the charger. No one from the company came to my house other than the guy doing the install. I'm wondering if this means that they're having a registered electrician signing off on a non-registered junior electrician's work or something, without actually seeing it. Is that something to just accept as the way it's sometimes done, or is it worth raising with them? On a side note, I can't find the name that signed it on electricalcompetentperson.co.uk, but perhaps it's enough that the company shows up?

3. Should I also expect a "Building Regulations Certificate of Compliance"? I assume I could verify that one via NICEIC Online Certification when/if it's issued? They haven't mentioned one yet but I planned on asking for one. I can't figure out whether one is needed or not if the electrician is competent and can self-certify.
I'd ask the installer for a copy of the DNO notification (to inform the DNO that there is a charger installed at the address). It contains details of the earthing, maximum demand, supply fuse etc
If its a EVHS Grant funded installation, I'd ask for a copy of the claim form for that.
Last one from me is a fully filled out warranty form detailing the EVSE model and serial number.
 

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I got an Electrical Installation Certificate and Building Regulations Certificate of Compliance plus a confirmation direct from the DNO that they had recorded my Charge Point installation.
 

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You can check that the Part P notification has been done by checking on the Council’s planning portal. I did that and found mine had be done ok.

Years later I discovered that the DNO notification hadn’t been done but there was no way of checking that at the time. From my experience of WPD, they seem quite approachable so might be happy to confirm that the proper process has been followed.
 

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I sent 9 documents to my last domestic client on handover for an EVSE install;

RA
MS
ENA Application Form
DNO confirmation email
EIC
Building regs compliance cert
EVSE Comissioning sheet
Manufacturer's Manual
Letter of findings and recommendations

As a minimum you should at least get an EIC and building control cert. It should be signed, but as a non techinical person this is something you need not to snag.
 

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I sent 9 documents to my last domestic client on handover for an EVSE install;

RA
MS
ENA Application Form
DNO confirmation email
EIC
Building regs compliance cert
EVSE Comissioning sheet
Manufacturer's Manual
Letter of findings and recommendations

As a minimum you should at least get an EIC and building control cert. It should be signed, but as a non techinical person this is something you need not to snag.
You missed out the crucial document, An invoice!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you everyone :)

I contacted NICEIC (which this company is certified via) and they said:

the NICEIC register the company and not individuals.

However, each registration will have a Qualified Supervisor (QS) in place.

It is the QS who we assess each year and who will review and sign off any certificates.

However, the QS would not necessarily have to be on site in person to sign the certificate.

They should be able to verify the work from the test results and/or photos provided on the certificate before they sign off.
So regarding my question #2, that part seems like it might be by the book.
 

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Thank you everyone :)

I contacted NICEIC (which this company is certified via) and they said:



So regarding my question #2, that part seems like it might be by the book.

This is the process that I think needs looking at, and is as described in post #3 above. It means that these companies can employ semi-skilled people to do a job that really should be done by someone fully qualified.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Right – I just wasn't clear on whether the "boss signing off without seeing" part was them doing something they were not supposed to. I assumed it was not allowed for someone to "inspect" the work without being there, but apparently NICEIC thinks it is. I agree it seems problematic.
 

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Right – I just wasn't clear on whether the "boss signing off without seeing" part was them doing something they were not supposed to. I assumed it was not allowed for someone to "inspect" the work without being there, but apparently NICEIC thinks it is. I agree it seems problematic.

It's fine if you happen to get someone competent and who takes pride in their work, the system only falls over when you get someone that is either out of their depth, in terms of competence, or who just doesn't care about doing a good job. Most of the time I'm sure it's fine, but having had to go around and sort out a fair few installations done by incompetent monkeys I'm just a tad biased!
 

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I’m surprised NICEIC allow what is effectively 3rd party certification.

Me too, but I saw this first hand a short time ago, with someone a year in, just qualified as an electrician's mate, working on his own doing notifiable work. His boss was going to remotely sign off his work without having seen it. It's an abuse of the system, IMHO, and as you say, it is, in effect, a third party sign off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Regarding signatures for the EIC and the building regs cert - I asked NICEIC about that as well and they said:

Contractors have the option to issue electronic certificates or hard copies.

I can confirm electronic copies of your certificates are sufficient and these will have an electronic signature, no further copy would be required.
 
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