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I have a Renault Zoe and am about to take delivery of an XC90 T8 plug-in hybrid. I just found out that they supply a three pin plug cable (???). Can I use my Zoe type 2 cable until I get another for the Volvo? Would there be any difference?

On a separate note, why can the Volvo not charge faster than a 3.6kw charger? I had been thinking about a three phase rapid charger to use with both cars but that’s pointless with the Volvo!

Thank you
 

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I have a Renault Zoe and am about to take delivery of an XC90 T8 plug-in hybrid. I just found out that they supply a three pin plug cable (???). Can I use my Zoe type 2 cable until I get another for the Volvo? Would there be any difference?

On a separate note, why can the Volvo not charge faster than a 3.6kw charger? I had been thinking about a three phase rapid charger to use with both cars but that’s pointless with the Volvo!

Thank you
The Type 2 cable will work fine on either car.

No real need for three phase charging - 7 kW is more than enough as the Zoe doesn’t have a huge battery.
 

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Does the XC90 have a standard battery size (either gross or useable)?
Looking at ads on AutoTrader and I'm seeing variations from 9.2kWh, 10.4kWh to 11.6kWh.

If there are variations, are they dependent on year built, spec or paid options.

Could do with a handy guide/review that has the info?
 

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It depends on when it was manufactured. Volvo increased the battery capacity to 11.6 kWh (with 9.9kwh usable from memory) as part of the MY20 update in around May/June 2019.

The earlier model had 10.4 kWh batteries. I have the 10.4 kWh battery in my car. In the winter I get about 16 miles in Hybrid mode (18-19 miles in Pure model) on an urban commute. In the summer it increases to about 25 miles In Hybrid mode for the same commute. In both cases the car is driven in B.

If you have any questions about the car, feel free to ask
 

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It depends on when it was manufactured. Volvo increased the battery capacity to 11.6 kWh (with 9.9kwh usable from memory) as part of the MY20 update in around May/June 2019.

The earlier model had 10.4 kWh batteries. I have the 10.4 kWh battery in my car. In the winter I get about 16 miles in Hybrid mode (18-19 miles in Pure model) on an urban commute. In the summer it increases to about 25 miles In Hybrid mode for the same commute. In both cases the car is driven in B.

If you have any questions about the car, feel free to ask
Thanks.

In Hybrid mode I assume it’s assisted by the ICE? I know it’s a heavy lump of a car and not very aero dynamic but it’s not a lot. Might just be enough. I imagine the ICE isn’t very efficient for long journeys either.
 

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In hybrid mode, yes though on my daily commute in summer it runs purely off the battery (commute is about 18 miles round trip). I usually get home with a quarter of a battery to spare.

I used to have a weekly 250 mile commute. When the battery was fully charged, the car is relatively efficient given its 2.5 tonnes and has a petrol motor. Fuel economy was usually around 40-45 mpg. I get better economy from the XC90 then I did from the 520d before it. If the battery is flat then I would get about 35-38 mpg.

Its’s a lovely car and hugely practical. The new XC90 will go on sale in 2022 with a full electric variant. Those models will be built in the US rather than Sweden.
 

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I’ve seen (online, not in the flesh) an XC90. It’s late 2015, R Design, in Bursting Blue. Looks real nice and has some nice kit.

There’s a reason it’s cheap though, it’s covered nearly 170k miles. Being sold by an independent garage.
It’s had one owner and FSH but I’ve yet to request some more info.

One the one hand, I’m thinking it’s cheap if can get it for just under £20k. But then it’s out of warranty and after spending that much I wold be pretty miffed if I had large repair bills the coming years.

Given the high mileage (avg 42k miles/yr), I suspect the battery wasn’t used much - so somebody had a high fuel bill!!
Therefore there will have been a lot of use on the ICE. A lot depends on story behind previous owner and the TLC/maintenance under his/her ownership.

Our own use case will be mostly sub 20 miles so should get by on battery only. If a turbo or supercharger or any other untold number of problems occurred then hopefully it’s still driveable until I’m ready to repair it.

Obviously the chassis, suspension, wheels, brakes etc will still need attention. The previous MOT advisories show that.

Would like to keep the car for 5-6 years

What are common problems with earlier version of the T8? Is there a way to check battery health?
 

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Our own use case will be mostly sub 20 miles so should get by on battery only.
Why buy a vastly overweight and under electric powered PHEV for that? :unsure:

It is stupidly overpriced for the very limited life that is left in the ICE components, particularly the transmission. Avoid it as a long-term purchase. (n)
 

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Why buy a vastly overweight and under electric powered PHEV for that? :unsure:

It is stupidly overpriced for the very limited life that is left in the ICE components, particularly the transmission. Avoid it as a long-term purchase. (n)
7 seats. Don’t have the budget for a Tesla and the NV200 won’t suit us
 

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7 seats. Don’t have the budget for a Tesla and the NV200 won’t suit us
A difficult predicament. I would be willing to bet that over the nominal 5 years of ownership the Tesla would cost less.
What about a Toyota Prius+?
 

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A difficult predicament. I would be willing to bet that over the nominal 5 years of ownership the Tesla would cost less.
What about a Toyota Prius+?
It probably would but I just don’t have the upfront capital for the Tesla.

My thoughts are that the XC90 has taken the brunt of the depreciation, by over £40k or 60%.
If we do less than average mileage over 5-6 years then by the time we come to sell
A) mileage will be average for age
B) ICE only cars will be disincentivised through road tax and congestion charging
C) PHEV/EV will become more ubiquitous and people will just “get it”. There’ll still be a need for 7 seaters.

So I would have some capital in car that would still be saleable in a few years time. Would be nice to be able to straight upgrade battery to whatever goes in the MY21, if not MY20.

Check me on my understanding but aren’t the Priuses not really that economical as they still burn petrol to charge battery and that battery doesn’t get you far on its own?
 

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It probably would but I just don’t have the upfront capital for the Tesla.

My thoughts are that the XC90 has taken the brunt of the depreciation, by over £40k or 60%.
If we do less than average mileage over 5-6 years then by the time we come to sell
A) mileage will be average for age
B) ICE only cars will be disincentivised through road tax and congestion charging
C) PHEV/EV will become more ubiquitous and people will just “get it”. There’ll still be a need for 7 seaters.

So I would have some capital in car that would still be saleable in a few years time. Would be nice to be able to straight upgrade battery to whatever goes in the MY21, if not MY20.

Check me on my understanding but aren’t the Priuses not really that economical as they still burn petrol to charge battery and that battery doesn’t get you far on its own?
You're right about the Prius+, it's only a standard hybrid (non-plug-in) so negligible electric range, something close to diesel-like economy I suspect. We looked at one soon after they launched but the 3rd row seat space and boot space was poor, far less than the Touran we had at the time, a complete non-starter or us.
I'm in a similar position to you in considering a used XC90 as a replacement for our Passat GTE when it comes to end of lease; we only have occasional need for 7 seats, but even for our family off 5, with three teenagers, I get regular complaints from the one stuck in the middle of the rear seat today as being too uncomfortable, especially on longer journeys. A Model X is a pipe-dream unfortunately, a used Model S might make more sense for us but our stretch budget won't reach far down the Tesla site used list at all... and the thread on here about Model S 85's supercharging speeds doesn't fill me with confidence for a private buy.
An XC90 T8 with big chunk of depreciation written off might make sense for us for the next 4 years or so, even taking a hit on petrol for longer journeys, then wait and see what's available after that.
BTW I don't think a battery upgrade is likely to be viable; perhaps from (say) a 2016 to 2020 model, where battery is same physical size I think but only gives a modest increase of 2kWh or so. Anything coming later will undoubtedly be a substantially updated model, probably the all electric variant from 2022.
 
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Nice to know I'm not the only one!
There's a fair few EVs/PHEVs out there but they cover the middle segment of the market. Will be some tiem before we see outliers such as 7 seaters, off roaders and roadsters with more choice.
You're right about the Prius+, it's only a standard hybrid (non-plug-in) so negligible electric range, something close to diesel-like economy I suspect. We looked at one soon after they launched but the 3rd row seat space and boot space was poor, far less than the Touran we had at the time, a complete non-starter or us.
I'm in a similar position to you in considering a used XC90 as a replacement for our Passat GTE when it comes to end of lease; we only have occasional need for 7 seats, but even for our family off 5, with three teenagers, I get regular complaints from the one stuck in the middle of the rear seat today as being too uncomfortable, especially on longer journeys. A Model X is a pipe-dream unfortunately, a used Model S might make more sense for us but our stretch budget won't reach far down the Tesla site used list at all... and the thread on here about Model S 85's supercharging speeds doesn't fill me with confidence for a private buy.
An XC90 T8 with big chunk of depreciation written off might make sense for us for the next 4 years or so, even taking a hit on petrol for longer journeys, then wait and see what's available after that.
BTW I don't think a battery upgrade is likely to be viable; perhaps from (say) a 2016 to 2020 model, where battery is same physical size I think but only gives a modest increase of 2kWh or so. Anything coming later will undoubtedly be a substantially updated model, probably the all electric variant from 2022.
 

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It probably would but I just don’t have the upfront capital for the Tesla.
You and me both! But loans are relatively cheap at present and the depreciation and maintenance is likely to be considerably less.
My thoughts are that the XC90 has taken the brunt of the depreciation, by over £40k or 60%.
If we do less than average mileage over 5-6 years then by the time we come to sell
A) mileage will be average for age
It is you that is taking the risk, but have you considered the cost of a replacement engine or transmission? That mileage is very high even by V90 D5 standards, most of which break expensively before or around then.
Check me on my understanding but aren’t the Priuses not really that economical as they still burn petrol to charge battery and that battery doesn’t get you far on its own?
You are correct - they are the dreaded misnamed self-charging hybrid, but their economy and longevity is very good by ICE standards - 50-60 mpg. If you get a mile out of the battery you are doing well.
 

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You and me both! But loans are relatively cheap at present and the depreciation and maintenance is likely to be considerably less.

It is you that is taking the risk, but have you considered the cost of a replacement engine or transmission? That mileage is very high even by V90 D5 standards, most of which break expensively before or around then.

You are correct - they are the dreaded misnamed self-charging hybrid, but their economy and longevity is very good by ICE standards - 50-60 mpg. If you get a mile out of the battery you are doing well.
I'm reluctant to take any loan. Trying to pay them off - which begs question why I would shell £20k on a car, that is 2nd hand.

On epf my previous cars,, not so long ago was a car I bought for £4k at 115k miles. 9 years later, when it was on it's last legs it had 250k miles on. I did have to spend some money along the way, not huge amounts in one go but still average a few £hundred a year. So my experience, by exception has meant high mileage cars aren't that bad. Especially if it's high mileage in a short period of time.

So a lot depends on what I can find out about previous owner rather than just sales patter.

A possible expensive repair bill has crossed my mind. No way to minimise that risk other than hop to drive mostly on battery.

I'm not 100% convinced just yet that this would be the right car. Have some time to mull it over.

The alternative would be to lease a new Skoda Kodiaq (no good deals at mo) or a Seat Tarraco.

In fact if I stretched to about £23-£25k I could by a brand new Kodia via DriveTheDeal - but I'm not sure on residuals.
 

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On epf my previous cars,, not so long ago was a car I bought for £4k at 115k miles. 9 years later, when it was on it's last legs it had 250k miles on. I did have to spend some money along the way, not huge amounts in one go but still average a few £hundred a year. So my experience, by exception has meant high mileage cars aren't that bad. Especially if it's high mileage in a short period of time.
Likewise, I have taken previous turbo diesels to around 250,000 miles with low expenses, but a highly stressed supercharged and turbocharged 2 litre petrol in such a heavy/unaerodynamic car has worked a lot harder to achieve that many miles in such a short period of time. The Aisin gearboxes in previous Volvos used to come unstuck around this mileage so I'd worry about that also. 170k miles driven by someone else is very different to 115k and then you taking it over. I wish you luck - you'll need it!
In fact if I stretched to about £23-£25k I could by a brand new Kodia via DriveTheDeal - but I'm not sure on residuals.
So in four years time you think that a 60k miles Kodia will be worth less than £5k more than a 230k miles 9 year old XC90, even assuming that you have no big bills with the latter? PHEVs will have to be very popular!
 
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