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2020 Kona premium SE
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Discussion Starter #1
With all the rain we have been having it got me thinking about wading depth as we tend to have a lot of floods round where i live when it rains bad.

Ive looked in the manual and it says

“Driving in Flooded Areas
Avoid driving through flooded areas unless you are sure the water is no higher than the bottom of the wheel hub.“

Ive not measured that but it does seem low compared to the ICE Kona that (apparently) has a wading depth of 500mm (saw that on a review so might be wrong)

Anyone have and experience with wading though fords, floods ect?
 

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So basically they are saying "don't get the battery wet". :)
The battery is lower than that.
They are saying don't get the wheel bearings under water, which is what most manufacturers say for their road cars - EV or ICE. It's also usually the level at which the bottom of the door reveals is getting below the water and for ICE the exhaust can plug if the engine revs drop too much.

For 'off-roaders' intended for such conditions then different advice will apply.

There is also the small matter that as the water rises up the sides of the car it will start to float. This is often fatal to the occupants.
 

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The issue for ANY car and for every driver is, do you know how deep the water is. If not do not proceed. If the car in front drives through and makes it the chances are its safe to follow. If the car in front stops, you see him climbing onto the roof or the car floats away then No.

The rules are no different for any car or van and Hyundai in their advice can not legislate for the actual conditions or driver stupidity. They can only ask you to use common sense.

I speak as someone who dealt with motor claims and lives near a local ford where drivers constantly ignore the warnings and the depth gauge.
 

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Kona PremSe64k 2020+bluelink +ohme
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Having had an ICE which went into a flood and went up in flames... Take care whatever the car.
 

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Kona64
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There is also the small matter that as the water rises up the sides of the car it will start to float. This is often fatal to the occupants.
This is the bigger risk, with cars having better door seals - just see the videos from Japan tsunami, or the Red Car in a UK city this week.

watch other vehicles , see what happens to them, else Turn Around.

If I did have 4 overweight rugby players in the car plus bricks in the boot I expect a BEV could submarine through.
But, as a SAR Tech with Lowland Rescue , our training warns us the Snorkel Landy can still whack into unseen objects in water and needs a human checker foot escort If it is not following a fire engine / army truck etc. You have seen clips of water erupting from a drain that has become dislodged - hit that at 15-20 mph in the wrong direction and game over. Same fallen tree in murky brown 30cm deep.
 

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Wading depth?! High voltage battery under the floor? :)

I think any wading is bound to be a disaster isn't it? I'd restrict myself to not wetting the actual wheel IIWY.
 

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Kona64
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So the question is really 'How do I find out how deep the water is?'
You watch someone else, or walk it yourself.

Remember the old Landrover Camel Trophy events? Exactly what they do.
 

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Submarines have high voltage batteries and they manage OK. ;)
I believe they achieve this by keeping the batteries inside the hull and the water on the outside.

Don't quote me, I may have that the wrong way round...
 

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I believe they achieve this by keeping the batteries inside the hull and the water on the outside.

Don't quote me, I may have that the wrong way round...
I think you are quite right.
I rather thought that the hefty metal case with sealed connectors that most car makers wrap round their battery packs constituted a waterproof 'hull'.

The difference is that in a submarine the battery and humans usually survive submersion ... in a car it'll just be the battery that comes out still live :eek:
 

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2020 Hyundai Kona Premium SE 64kWh, Ceramic Blue
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I watched a Tesla S drive through what looked like 500 mm last February. I didn't follow.
 

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An EV can wade to far greater depth than a combustion-engined vehicle as all electrical components are sealed, whereas you have air intakes and an exhaust pipe in an ICE. However that's just in terms of the propulsion parts of the cars... the bigger problems are water ingress through other seals and the 12V battery wiring starting to go bonkers if it gets into the fuse box and so on.

If you try wading through 500mm of water in anything other than a snorkel-equipped off-roader, you're an idiot and deserve everything you get!
 
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Discussion Starter #18
I wasn’t really meaning deep deep floods, im not crazy. The depths ive seen near me are probably maxing out at 200 - 300 mm range. Id be turning round as it approaches 300 any way. Before my kona i had a jeep so never really had to worry.

not really sure how to Measure to the bottom of the hubs without taking a wheel off ? But then the car would be jacked up so it would be wrong anyway. And cant find an actual ground to bottom of hub measurement anywhere. Ill try and see if i can work out how to do that measurement some point this weekend.
 

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Cars don't have hubs these days. I suspect that hub advice has been carried over from a 1950 manual somewhere. Along with how to service sticking semaphore indicators.
 

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The battery's vent will be in the disconnect/fuse plug under the rear seat and likely determines the immediate fate of the EV.
 
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