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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I go to the supermarket 2/3 times a week for bread milk etc. I park 500 yards away at the 50kw charger walk in and walk back taking around 40 mins or so and will return with the shopping then nip to another shop to make it an hour at the charger if i need medicine etc for the wife. I have noticed that the highest i have seen the charge rate in the car is 24kw. Is it the car or the charger that sets the rate?
Does the 20% - 80% sweet spot apply when charging as i sat watching the charge rate on the dash and it was constant from 73% to 88% at 23/24kw
I am slowly grasping the need to be wary of acceleration and driving style but find staying at 60 on dual carriageways and motorways hard especially when at 60 the gps says 57 and then i am sat among the trucks and i dont want that.
I would prefer 65 (62 actual) but would that make a significant reduction in range?
Then throw outside temp in the mix and it becomes even more confusing.
 

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I have plugged in at one Engie charger in Wakefield. Got a max of 47kW but in much better weather.

Have a look at this, at 73%SOC, the Soul should still do 36-38kW, but quickly drop to 24kW at ~77%SOC:
137421


I don't think there is anything wrong to be honest. You can check the charger, but I doubt you have a second car to do that? Or easier, check Zap-Map comments? Second option, for your situation, I would say: coldgating? What was the outside and battery temp?

The sweet spot for charging the Soul is 10% to 53%, I think this is actually wrong on the graph that I posted. The Soul keeps charging at about 73 - 77kW on a 100kW charger, all the way up to 53%SOC.

PS Edit: according to Bjorn Nyland, the sweet spot for all Koreans is "charge to max 73%SOC" if on the road.
 

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If you are going to the local supermarket it sounds like you won't be giving the battery a chance to warm up. A cold battery won't charge especially fast. Also watching the battery from 73-88% as you say isn't really a good use case for a rapid charger either. To get anywhere near 50kW in most EVs you will need a warm battery and a low level of charge remaining in the battery pack. Unplug by 80% especially when we are talking about local and not long distance charging, as you're probably just wasting your time, and potentially obstructing someone else from getting a charge.

As for driving on motorways, the faster you go, the more energy you use (before considering other factors like temperature, wind and rain/snow) Try it out for yourself to see just how significant the difference is. It would be down to you to decide if you want to make the trade of less range for more speed. On a long trip with multiple charge stops though, you'll ultimately take more time to complete your journey by driving faster however.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks Todor
73% equates to around 200 miles range then?
So unless we know we are going to use the power its pointles (especially when paying at home ) going any further with the charging past 75%?
I thought that when the charger is (eventually) fitted we would charge at home on the 5p tarrif to top off what was used that day and maybe get a bit extra in over a week or so on the cheaper tarriff.

If you are going to the local supermarket it sounds like you won't be giving the battery a chance to warm up. A cold battery won't charge especially fast. Also watching the battery from 73-88% as you say isn't really a good use case for a rapid charger either. To get anywhere near 50kW in most EVs you will need a warm battery and a low level of charge remaining in the battery pack. Unplug by 80% especially when we are talking about local and not long distance charging, as you're probably just wasting your time, and potentially obstructing someone else from getting a charge.

As for driving on motorways, the faster you go, the more energy you use (before considering other factors like temperature, wind and rain/snow) Try it out for yourself to see just how significant the difference is. It would be down to you to decide if you want to make the trade of less range for more speed. On a long trip with multiple charge stops though, you'll ultimately take more time to complete your journey by driving faster however.
Thanks for the reply 80698
I am getting the mindset that speed over 60 kills the range but by how much is the question and then live with that in the real world?
I will when i am able actually take a100 mile round trip and see what difference it makes at 60mph and 70 mph both on motorway/ dual carriageway and then A/B roads etc.
I am also mindful of me blocking a charger when there could be other people needing to use it.
I am wanting to go to North Scotland when all this covid thing is over and was going to use the Landcruiser but would rather go in the Soul but am very nervous about this at the moment.
 

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73% equates to around 200 miles range then?
So unless we know we are going to use the power its pointles (especially when paying at home ) going any further with the charging past 75%?
I thought that when the charger is (eventually) fitted we would charge at home on the 5p tarrif to top off what was used that day and maybe get a bit extra in over a week or so on the cheaper tarriff.
I would say 73% is 150miles. Hear me: GOM will show about 180miles, I personally would not want to get in the "reserve", so take 30 miles off of the GOM, and you have real safe 150miles. Have tested the 150mile trips a few times already, so quite good.

Personally, I have set up my car to charge to 60% on AC (home). Don't need more and in about a week I would get to below 35%. The weekend can dip me further, but so far I am getting in the habit to plug-in once a week.

Any long distance travel, I work it out on the spot.
 

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When charging at home I am currently following the regime of charging from 40% to 80% as that 40% in equates to around 26kwh which is close to the max of what I can get in during the 4 hours cheap rate at 5p.

When rapid charging, the temperature of the battery will make a huge difference. I have used the Engie rapids a few times and seen it get no higher than 25kw if I went straight there (4 miles) so the battery was cold, but if I visit after going on a decent run I can get 47kw. It will always throttle down beyond 73-75% though - that's the cars battery management systems turning the dial down to protect the battery, so if you are watching the rate you're getting when the s.o.c. is between 73-88% then what you saw is about what to expect. Take it on a run and start a charge when under 50% and you should see high 40kw's

In terms of the difference between 60 and 70mph, ultimately it's up to you how much you think it matters. Yes, efficiency at 70mph will be a bit lower than at 60mph, but I wouldn't drive at a speed I was not comfortable was high enough just to eke out a few more digits on the efficiency rating. Electricity is too cheap to worry about it to that extent. I'd hazard a guess you never gave it much thought when you drove an ICE car and the fuel was 10x more expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
When charging at home I am currently following the regime of charging from 40% to 80% as that 40% in equates to around 26kwh which is close to the max of what I can get in during the 4 hours cheap rate at 5p.

When rapid charging, the temperature of the battery will make a huge difference. I have used the Engie rapids a few times and seen it get no higher than 25kw if I went straight there (4 miles) so the battery was cold, but if I visit after going on a decent run I can get 47kw. It will always throttle down beyond 73-75% though - that's the cars battery management systems turning the dial down to protect the battery, so if you are watching the rate you're getting when the s.o.c. is between 73-88% then what you saw is about what to expect. Take it on a run and start a charge when under 50% and you should see high 40kw's

In terms of the difference between 60 and 70mph, ultimately it's up to you how much you think it matters. Yes, efficiency at 70mph will be a bit lower than at 60mph, but I wouldn't drive at a speed I was not comfortable was high enough just to eke out a few more digits on the efficiency rating. Electricity is too cheap to worry about it to that extent. I'd hazard a guess you never gave it much thought when you drove an ICE car and the fuel was 10x more expensive.
I now realise that getting the battery to temp has nothing to do with when the interior of the car is toasty as with an ICE car.
The rapid charging speed being dependant on the temp of the battery makes sense as im around 3 miles from Rothwell where i go to the supermarket and that is where i get 24kw but now do wonder how long/many miles it takes to warm the battery?
i do wonder what the difference is between 60 & 70 mph makes to economy.
You are correct i didnt give it much thought when i drove an ice car but it takes 5 minutes to put 200+ miles of range into an ice car but i will have to get used to putting miles into the car while i sleep and get used to only putting in what i need while on a route.
 
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