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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone!
I'm writing an article for new and potential EV owners answering some of their most commonly asked questions. Cost, in particular, is something that seems to hold people back from getting an EV. I'd love to share some wisdom from current EV owners. Would anybody be willing to share what you wish you knew about EV charging costs before you got your EV? It would be great if I could also use your name and possibly a photo in the article. Thank you!
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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Easiest way to compare is to look at the miles/kWh. Most BEVs will do 3.5 - 4m/kWh. Multiply by 10 to get approx ICE vehicles miles per gallon. so 35 miles needs 10kWh which costs, in the UK from 50p at home to £3.60 at a public charger.
How does this compare with petrol or diesel costs? Very good of course. If a gas guzzling petrol ICE does 17.5mpg, then the saving is doubled.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
A Scottish view might be a bit skewed as they have enjoyed free charging at the Government's expense for a considerable time.
Oh interesting! I'll definitely be sure to mention that and recommend readers to look for potential charging subsidies based on their country of origin. Would you say this has encouraged EV ownership in Scotland? And, if so, do you think this might encourage more governments to provide free or subsidized charging in future?
 

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Working out EV charging costs is no different to working out ICE refueling costs - the only real difference is that fuel prices tend to be written in bright lights on big signs. I only charge at home, I knew how much my energy tariff charged in p/kWh, and I had a rough idea of miles/kWh of the car I was buying from the test drive, so cost per mile is easy to work out - (p/kWh) / (miles/kWh), job done.

If you're going to use public chargers, you just look up their tariffs (and membership fees if applicable), and it's the same basic maths.

It's slightly more complicated if you're buying a PHEV, but it's still just basic maths...

So basically, it's a legitimate concern, but one that can be very quickly addressed with a calculator......
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Easiest way to compare is to look at the miles/kWh. Most BEVs will do 3.5 - 4m/kWh. Multiply by 10 to get approx ICE vehicles miles per gallon. so 35 miles needs 10kWh which costs, in the UK from 50p at home to £3.60 at a public charger.
How does this compare with petrol or diesel costs? Very good of course. If a gas guzzling petrol ICE does 17.5mpg, then the saving is doubled.
Great insights
I've been really pleased with the low running costs but I just had to replace my EVSE and am not eligible for the grant so that ate into the savings quite a bit.
Ah I see, and if I may ask, why did you need to replace your EVSE? Was it just normal wear and tear or did something go wrong? From what I read the lifespan is predicted by some to be around 10 years
 

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Hyundai Ioniq 28
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Do you have cheap overnight tariffs for EV charging in the USA? Here in the UK they can make a huge difference in running costs if mileage use is high. The cost per kWh overnight can be 1/3rd of normal home prices. Offset by higher daytime use of course but many people arrange to also use items such as dishwashers, clothes washers and driers overnight. We even have one tariff that can actually pay people to charge their car overnight at times when there is excess power in the grid. Car charging costs here in the UK can vary considerably.
 

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Easiest way to compare is to look at the miles/kWh. Most BEVs will do 3.5 - 4m/kWh. Multiply by 10 to get approx ICE vehicles miles per gallon. so 35 miles needs 10kWh which costs, in the UK from 50p at home to £3.60 at a public charger.
How does this compare with petrol or diesel costs? Very good of course. If a gas guzzling petrol ICE does 17.5mpg, then the saving is doubled.
US Gallon or Imperial
 

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Hi everyone!
I'm writing an article for new and potential EV owners answering some of their most commonly asked questions. Cost, in particular, is something that seems to hold people back from getting an EV. I'd love to share some wisdom from current EV owners. Would anybody be willing to share what you wish you knew about EV charging costs before you got your EV? It would be great if I could also use your name and possibly a photo in the article. Thank you!
Why is the question about CHARGING COSTS. Why not pose the same about depreciation or leasing costs, serving costs, emission zone tarrifs, insurance costs. All more relevant than charging costs.
 

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Peugeot e-208
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I did a lot of research before getting my car, and thought I'd covered all of the sneaky things they don't shout about in the brochure: winter range, rapid charging that is much slower than the headline rate, broken or fussy chargers.

The one thing that took my by surprise was charging losses. Not covered anywhere in the research I'd done, and the Renault Zoe can easily lose a third when charging on the granny lead.
 

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I think it is the initial outlay for the car purchase. When I bought my first 'EV' well actually an 'EREV' (Vauxhall Ampera - same as a Chevrolet Volt) charging stations were few and far between and my commute was more than I could manage on a single charge and so needed the back-up of the petrol generator. I still managed to save money over the equivalent petrol/diesel alternatives. Now there are more chargers available and cars have a much better range I can manage my commute in my pure BEV with ease on battery with no charging stops and only need to charge at home. People I have spoken to in an effort to persuade them come back to the issue of the availability of chargers away from home. My town has one rapid which has been out of actions since December 2020, the next nearest one is 17 miles away (half an hour) and not in the direction of the normal traffic route so anyone planning a longer journey has to have a plan A, B and C just in case the charger aimed for is not operational or in use, with someone waiting which all adds to journey times. Currently, in Scotland there is one main network, ChargePlaceScotland, they manage the back-office functions on behalf of the Scottish Government and the individual points are owned by the landowners in either council-owned property (public car-parks etc) or private property, hotels, restaurants etc. with the units fees being set by the owner. There is a lot of differing tariffs around the network with some including a minimum charge and others have a connection fee over and above the actual cost per kWh. Once there are more networks and chargers available then a certain amount of competition will arise and hopefully costs will settle down.
 

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GOLF GTE PHEV
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i think the very different driving experience is also a pleasant consequence of electric motor propulsion.

There is no turbo lag, no automatic gearbox with sluggish changes and max torque is available from zero mph. (ok, not max on all EVs at zero rpm to avoid wheelspin and higher powered models do have a gearbox to enable higher speeds)

Performance was important to, so the Leaf's 215bhp and 0-62mph in 6.9secs mattered more than maximum miles/kWh.

Regenerative braking and 1 pedal mode is also useful and works very well on the Leaf.
 

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I think it's worth mentioning that many supermarkets offer free charging points now, pretty sure Tesco's have introduced 7kw chargers across the board in their larger stores now (at least here in the South West). The only places you really have to pay are motorway services on those longer trips and for high speed at regular petrol stations which they're now starting to roll out.

For home charging (for those with driveways) most EV's have access to special tariffs, even with EDF's middling scheme my i3 with a fairly "average" 42kw-h battery costs around £3.50 to top up from near empty.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I see AndreaH has started another I wish I had known type of thread. Any chance you can share something about yourself. Eg freelance journalist? Based where? Etc etc.
Hey Freddy! Sure thing, I'm an Editor for The Next Web. The majority of our readers come from the US, UK and the Netherlands so it's great to get a variety of perspectives!
 
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