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Hi guys

Looking at buying a Nissan leaf for as cheap as possible. My work now has free charge points and my commute is 10miles so it makes sense economically.

I see some 2011 leafs at 30-40k miles for maybe 6-7k. Also seeing 2016 leafs with 70k+ mileage, for slightly more money.

I'm new to electric vehicles, is it better to go for a newer car or a lower milage?

Thanks ?
 

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Basically it's your personal preference. Higher mileage cars will have more wear and tear on their transmission, tyres, braking, suspension and steering systems. They are different to ICE vehicles in that there are no exhausts, engine and ignition systems to worry about. HOWEVER, battery condition is important, you may find a low mileage car that has been sat on a forecourt for ages at 100% charge, that won't have done it any good.

You pays your money and takes your chances. Leafspy Pro is your friend. If buying privately, see how knowledgeable the seller is about the charging side of the vehicle, ask how they have charged it, that makes a difference. See how well they've looked after it, open the tailgate and see if there is a load of dirt and detritus or mildew in the well under the spoiler-that is a dead giveaway as to how it has been treated. Under the bonnet if you see a load of dead leaves and pine needles in the nooks and crannies, that too tells you they don't look after it.
 
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I agree with the above. The LEAF went through a life cycle improvement in 2013 with a significant set of changes to the electronics and the trim - I'd suggest getting one of the Gen2 as they are referred to that dates from after then and can be identified by a flat boot floor - the Gen1 have a raised bar across the front of the boot behind the rear seat backs.
Battery condition is much more important than mileage, but wheel bearings do wear out and brakes are subject to corrosion due to lack of use. Body damage is just that - it should have been correctly repaired.
 

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Age. My Leaf is 9 years old with 70k miles and it's down to 60% battery health (so rather than a Leaf 24 it's a Leaf 14. If a 2016 with 70k miles had capacity that low it would qualify for a warranty repair
 

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I would definitely go newer. The early cars suffered much worse with degredation, and time is a big component of that degradation.

Ofcourse, check the SOH of any car you buy. My 2017 model is on 50K and has 93% SOH.
 

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I would steer clear of the early made-in-Japan Leafs (2011-12), as noted above the "Gen2"/Sunderland models had several improvements, including to the battery chemistry, I believe. Unless you're happy with a car purely for your relatively short commute/trips to the local shops and can get one for pocket change.

Also be wary of cars with excessively low mileages, since that suggests they have sat for a lot of time, likely either highly charged or not charged enough. One with moderate or even slightly high mileage is likely to have a battery in better condition, unless your talking about the likes of an ex-taxi that has been rapid charged every day. Generally battery health seems to hold up best when the battery is seeing moderate and frequent usage.

EDIT: I believe the foot-operated parking brake is a fairly good indicator of the Sunderland-built model (as opposed to the electronic parking brake on the original built-in-Japan ones).
 

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Another vote for age.

Leaf 24 gen2 generally degrade 2-3% every year (which looks lower than Edd's 40% over 9 years,). Going newer should almost guarantee you more usage capacity.

True, other parts of the car will be more worn and may require a repair that's not required on lower mileage cars. But same with all cars you want to keep long time, the biggest non-servisable component is most important, in EV's case, it's the battery.
 

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Note the relatively low degredation on the battery on this relatively high mileage 30 kWh car.
£9.5k for a 30kWh with a minor external cosmetic issue seems pretty reasonable indeed.
 
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