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Discussion Starter #1
When our main car was a plug-in hybrid and the second car was a rarely-used diesel, it was easy to decide to take the diesel out once every few weeks. When we did, it generated more pollution (especially urban), but the cost and economy weren‘t that much worse than the hybrid for all but the shortest journeys. The main argument against using it was that it’s owned rather than leased, so we choose to put the minimum miles on the clock.

Now that the main car is an EV and leased, every factor in what we choose to drive is weighted significantly in favour of the main car, except needing to keep the diesel from developing problems due to inactivity.

I’ll probably hold onto the diesel for another couple of years before I try to figure out how to replace it (for lots of reasons that I’ll save for another thread), so what should I do to keep it in working condition while I have it? There’s a small solar panel plugged into the OBD2 port, so the battery is fine. My current plan is to take it for a 20 mile drive at least once a month, but I’m not a mechanic and I’m not sure whether that’s more or less than I ought to be doing. Should I move it a fraction to change the load on the tyres? Should I put it under a protective cover (it’s on the drive and I wouldn’t mind removing a cover but I doubt my wife would feel the same)? Is all this irrelevant? What should I consider? I can’t be the only one in this position...
 

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When our main car was a plug-in hybrid and the second car was a rarely-used diesel, it was easy to decide to take the diesel out once every few weeks. When we did, it generated more pollution (especially urban), but the cost and economy weren‘t that much worse than the hybrid for all but the shortest journeys. The main argument against using it was that it’s owned rather than leased, so we choose to put the minimum miles on the clock.

Now that the main car is an EV and leased, every factor in what we choose to drive is weighted significantly in favour of the main car, except needing to keep the diesel from developing problems due to inactivity.

I’ll probably hold onto the diesel for another couple of years before I try to figure out how to replace it (for lots of reasons that I’ll save for another thread), so what should I do to keep it in working condition while I have it? There’s a small solar panel plugged into the OBD2 port, so the battery is fine. My current plan is to take it for a 20 mile drive at least once a month, but I’m not a mechanic and I’m not sure whether that’s more or less than I ought to be doing. Should I move it a fraction to change the load on the tyres? Should I put it under a protective cover (it’s on the drive and I wouldn’t mind removing a cover but I doubt my wife would feel the same)? Is all this irrelevant? What should I consider? I can’t be the only one in this position...
Put it on here and make some money from it.
 
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When our main car was a plug-in hybrid and the second car was a rarely-used diesel, it was easy to decide to take the diesel out once every few weeks. When we did, it generated more pollution (especially urban), but the cost and economy weren‘t that much worse than the hybrid for all but the shortest journeys. The main argument against using it was that it’s owned rather than leased, so we choose to put the minimum miles on the clock.

Now that the main car is an EV and leased, every factor in what we choose to drive is weighted significantly in favour of the main car, except needing to keep the diesel from developing problems due to inactivity.

I’ll probably hold onto the diesel for another couple of years before I try to figure out how to replace it (for lots of reasons that I’ll save for another thread), so what should I do to keep it in working condition while I have it? There’s a small solar panel plugged into the OBD2 port, so the battery is fine. My current plan is to take it for a 20 mile drive at least once a month, but I’m not a mechanic and I’m not sure whether that’s more or less than I ought to be doing. Should I move it a fraction to change the load on the tyres? Should I put it under a protective cover (it’s on the drive and I wouldn’t mind removing a cover but I doubt my wife would feel the same)? Is all this irrelevant? What should I consider? I can’t be the only one in this position...
It's a diesel, send it to the crusher😜😜😜😜
 

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Kona PremSe64k 2020+bluelink +ohme
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From a planetary perspective it should go to be scrapped, imo. All that keeping it will do is consume more fossil fuels.
 

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We are in a very similar scenario. Especially during lockdown. Our 2nd car (diesel) just sits there not doing much! We still need a second car though as once the wifes maternity leave ends she needs to drive to work 3 times a week. Its a 14 plate so not devalued enough to benefit from any potential scrappage scheme and to be honest for the amount of miles it does i cant really justify replacing it with an EV.

Maybe we should trade them for a similarly priced petrol?
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Put it on here and make some money from it.
Interesting to see that someone near us seems to be running a Kia rental agency - and posting the same car more than once...

I might just try this.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
We are in a very similar scenario. Especially during lockdown. Our 2nd car (diesel) just sits there not doing much! We still need a second car though as once the wifes maternity leave ends she needs to drive to work 3 times a week. Its a 14 plate so not devalued enough to benefit from any potential scrappage scheme and to be honest for the amount of miles it does i cant really justify replacing it with an EV.

Maybe we should trade them for a similarly priced petrol?
I’d say the jury is out on whether it’s worse to run a diesel or a petrol when 90% of the miles it will do are long journeys with lower CO2 emissions from the diesel. I haven’t compared the particulate emissions, but I’m guessing it would cost me a few thousand to switch and the benefit is questionable...
 

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If your ICE is reliable and fits criteria, you could get paid to keep it running by listing on Turo.

 
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Discussion Starter #13
For two years I'd probably lay it up properly and sorn it.
Good point. I need to check the SORN and ”un-SORN” process.

Actually, if I decided to SORN it you can guarantee I’ll immediately need the blooming thing for an unexpected journey. If I don’t expect to need it at all, I’d have no reason to keep it...
 

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Why not sell it while the market is high for second hand cars? If you really needed a car again you'd be able to rent one, or buy a cheap one and still be in profit vs. paying tax, and insurance on it for years. If you plan on driving it 20 miles you can't SORN it unless you are a big private land owner, in which case this thread wouldn't exist. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Why not sell it while the market is high for second hand cars? If you really needed a car again you'd be able to rent one, or buy a cheap one and still be in profit vs. paying tax, and insurance on it for years. If you plan on driving it 20 miles you can't SORN it unless you are a big private land owner, in which case this thread wouldn't exist. :p
I’ve decided to keep it for now for a whole host of complicated reasons, although the sell and rent plan was on the shortlist of options. It’s interesting to learn about TURO, which might be a better option.

I do need to minimise the chance it will let me down when I need it.
 

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I’ve decided to keep it for now for a whole host of complicated reasons, although the sell and rent plan was on the shortlist of options. It’s interesting to learn about TURO, which might be a better option.

I do need to minimise the chance it will let me down when I need it.
So mow much is it costing you to tax, and insure to sit on your drive? Obviously with TURO you need to check with your insurance that it would be covered, as TURO have many ways of getting out of paying you with theirs when things go wrong.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
So mow much is it costing you to tax, and insure to sit on your drive? Obviously with TURO you need to check with your insurance that it would be covered, as TURO have many ways of getting out of paying you with theirs when things go wrong.
I think it’s about £500 a year to tax and insure. That‘s a bit less than I’d pay to hire a 7-seater for a week, which I’d expect to need to do at least once a year between now and getting rid of it.

TURO‘s main message to owners seems to be that they sort out the insurance. Are you suggesting they’re not to be trusted? 😮😂
 

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I think it’s about £500 a year to tax and insure. That‘s a bit less than I’d pay to hire a 7-seater for a week, which I’d expect to need to do at least once a year between now and getting rid of it.

TURO‘s main message to owners seems to be that they sort out the insurance. Are you suggesting they’re not to be trusted? 😮😂
Just aware that they are very strict if your vehicle ends up broken/stolen/damaged, and obviopusly they do everything they can to mitigate paying out more than they have to.

Here' the T&C's for lending it out with them.

United Kingdom
In the UK, vehicles must:

  • Be owned by someone over 25 years of age (23 and 24 year olds may list vehicles that are younger than 3 years.)
  • Be registered in England, Scotland, Wales, or Northern Ireland
  • Be privately owned (company cars are not permitted)
  • Meet our insurance requirement. And, you must make your insurer aware of the vehicle’s intended use on Turo
  • Be no more than 10 years old
  • Be in ABI Group 1 - 36, inclusive (If you are 23 or 24 years old, the vehicle must be between 1 - 16.)
  • Have a fair market value of up to £75,000**
  • Have fewer than 130,000 miles**
  • Have not been written off***
  • Meet Turo safety and maintenance requirements
  • Not be high-performance models, kit cars, left-hand drive, commercial vehicles, or minibuses
  • Have a valid MoT Certificate and have annual vehicle servicing where required
  • If leased and the insurance is provided by the leasing company, the leasing company should be aware of the vehicle’s intended use on Turo
  • Be registered in the host’s name or their spouse’s name
  • Be listed in an individual’s (not company’s) name if covered by a Motor Trade policy. Policy must provide SD+P cover. Hosts must submit a copy of the certificate of insurance to confirm coverage.
  • Proven not to have been previous total loss or is subject to outstanding finance. You must provide a Hire Purchase Information (HPI) check made on the vehicle to ensure this.
    • These categories include, A, B, C, D, N and S.
Turo doesn’t permit UK hosts who are using a Turo protection plan to list any Tesla model vehicles, specialty vehicles, or classic cars. However, Commercial Hosts may do so. A UK specialty car must be at least 15 years old and have a market value of more than £15,000.

Any vehicle you list on Turo must be exclusively shared on Turo. You can’t list on Turo any vehicle you’re currently sharing or intend to share on another car sharing platform. If a host violates this policy, Turo may take action. This may include a fine, a penalty, denial of a physical damage claim, removal of the car from the platform, closing the host’s account, or other actions. See all the details in our Exclusivity policy.
 

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Just aware that they are very strict if your vehicle ends up broken/stolen/damaged, and obviopusly they do everything they can to mitigate paying out more than they have to.

Here' the T&C's for lending it out with them.

United Kingdom
In the UK, vehicles must:


  • Be owned by someone over 25 years of age (23 and 24 year olds may list vehicles that are younger than 3 years.)
  • Be registered in England, Scotland, Wales, or Northern Ireland
  • Be privately owned (company cars are not permitted)
  • Meet our insurance requirement. And, you must make your insurer aware of the vehicle’s intended use on Turo
  • Be no more than 10 years old
  • Be in ABI Group 1 - 36, inclusive (If you are 23 or 24 years old, the vehicle must be between 1 - 16.)
  • Have a fair market value of up to £75,000**
  • Have fewer than 130,000 miles**
  • Have not been written off***
  • Meet Turo safety and maintenance requirements
  • Not be high-performance models, kit cars, left-hand drive, commercial vehicles, or minibuses
  • Have a valid MoT Certificate and have annual vehicle servicing where required
  • If leased and the insurance is provided by the leasing company, the leasing company should be aware of the vehicle’s intended use on Turo
  • Be registered in the host’s name or their spouse’s name
  • Be listed in an individual’s (not company’s) name if covered by a Motor Trade policy. Policy must provide SD+P cover. Hosts must submit a copy of the certificate of insurance to confirm coverage.
  • Proven not to have been previous total loss or is subject to outstanding finance. You must provide a Hire Purchase Information (HPI) check made on the vehicle to ensure this.
    • These categories include, A, B, C, D, N and S.
Turo doesn’t permit UK hosts who are using a Turo protection plan to list any Tesla model vehicles, specialty vehicles, or classic cars. However, Commercial Hosts may do so. A UK specialty car must be at least 15 years old and have a market value of more than £15,000.

Any vehicle you list on Turo must be exclusively shared on Turo. You can’t list on Turo any vehicle you’re currently sharing or intend to share on another car sharing platform. If a host violates this policy, Turo may take action. This may include a fine, a penalty, denial of a physical damage claim, removal of the car from the platform, closing the host’s account, or other actions. See all the details in our Exclusivity policy.
The conditions seem reasonable to me.
 
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The conditions seem reasonable to me.
They are very reasonable, as I said you need to be aware of the insurance, not the T&C's for them listing your vehicle. Not to mention that once you tell your insurer that your car is in a car sharing program you are likely to find that it is invalid, or they will put you on a much higher priced policy with different exceptions, as you are using it for business.
 
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