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What would you pay for Ultra Rapid Charging ability?

  • up to £300

    Votes: 4 28.6%
  • £300 to £500

    Votes: 8 57.1%
  • over £500

    Votes: 2 14.3%
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
'Ultra rapid' charging (100/125kW) is optional on the Skoda ENYAQ iV (50kW is standard on the lower model range) but what would you be prepared to pay and would you consider paying extra for this feature on a used car? (It is a £440 option, so is it worth ticking the box, either for personal usage or for a more desirable car to sell on!)
 

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Skoda Enyaq Sportline 80 (soon...)
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I've voted £300-£500 as I've spec'd it on my Sportline 80. I think anyone that doesn't tick it will have a hard time selling against cars that do have it in a few years. However, I've also heard that they are planning to offer it as a software upgrade, most likely by subscription, so all may not be lost if you've not ticked it. I'd rather it was just built in to the car but that's life!
 

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(Id3 owner here - who has the fast charging).
At the moment I wouldn’t pay anything for it.

50% of my charges are on 50kw or higher chargers as I do quite a few long journeys - but I’ve only been able to hook up to a 100kw twice (circumstance). When I have it’s been great.

if I had a 50kw capable Enyaq I’d wait for a year or two when 100kw chargers are far more common (it’s happening - an MFG 8 charger station opened 3 miles away last month) - then pay for the upgrade if you want it. It will I’m sure just be a software update….

if you do 90%+ of your trips from a home charge - it’s not worth it yet…
 

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I suspect ultra-rapid charging pays for the greater number of warranty claims, for the few % of people who exclusively rapid charge.

The cost isn't that much more - the batteries are the same chemistry and cooling system likely similar. Beefier cables and contactors maybe.

On that basis max. £300
 

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Err… about £440?

It’s likely to have a bigger impact on the used market though, I think cars without it are going to be deeply undesirable.
 
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Kia Soul EV 2020 64KWh
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Err… about £440?

It’s likely to have a bigger impact on the used market though, I think cars without it are going to be deeply undesirable.
I would agree with this. 50kw is not fantastic now. Lots of pretty routine cars max out much faster than this. In 4 years time, when lots more cars are introduced to the market with 800v systems like the Kia's and Hyundai's maxing out at over 200kw, a car with a max of 50kw will be, as you say, deeply unimpressive.
 

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I ordered mine (a 60) without it.

I decided that on balance, the extra cost wasnt worth it. The smaller battery only does 100, starts tapering pretty early anyway, and there arent many 100kw chargers around.

Additionally, for me, the scottish EV loan only covers 28k, so i was already having to stump up 5k, and any additional options were all just adding to that up front lump sum. I'd rather have the heated steering wheel.

Its also something i would rarely use. The infrequent rapid charging i do currently in the LEAF would all but completely disappear with a 60kwh battery, leaving the odd infrequent longer trip a handfull of times a year. And on those longer trips, with children, stops are frequent and long anyway.
 

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Kia E Niro 4
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Ultra Rapid charging is only really required if you are pressed for time and want a quick stop, I suspect most people would be stopping for at least 30-45 minutes after travelling the range of such cars which is likely to be 250 miles, at which point an 18 minute charge is not important.
 

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eNiro 64kWh 2021. Ioniq 38kWh 2020.
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I know it is contentious, but I wouldn't class 100/120 kw as Ultra Fast Charging. I would expect 175kw+ and I think this is worth paying for if you have a lot of long distance journeys. Hyundai and Kia have set the benchmark with 800v charging at over 200kw. Now that is ultra fast.
 

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If that’s all it ends up being, it’ll be hacked wide open in no time.
Sat Nav on the B250e was £500 - for an SD card with map data - the hardware was all there.

As you can imagine the SD could be purchased for £50 online.
 

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Blue BMW i3s 94ah 2018
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I know it is contentious, but I wouldn't class 100/120 kw as Ultra Fast Charging.
Reading through comments and had come to the same conclusion. The other day, I saw a cluster of four shiny new 350kw rapid charge points.

My little i3 is 50kw max, but it’s three years old. A new vehicle offering a (not inexpensive) upgrade and looking to the future should probably aiming for high kWs.
 

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It's actually a rather difficult question. If you're buying the car (and FFS, why would you!), you do have to think about selling it on.
If you're leasing, it's a bit easier and it goes to how much you'll be charging on the road on rapids...
'Ultra' rapids - let's say in excess of 100kW are becoming more common and, arguably rightly, they charge a premium for their energy because they can deliver it at a higher rate (power) (note: power being rate of delivery of energy). It would be galling to sit on one of these and be paying a premium for that energy while you're only receiving it slowly. You may also be receiving dirty looks from those with cars capable of making better use of these chargers while they queue behind you. But if you do this only occasionally, big deal.
If your car is efficient - nothing to do with range but actually is mi/kWh (think mpg) - it won't be charging for long.
If you don't think you'll be charging much on rapids, being able to take advantage of the faster ones matters less and waiting while you do matters less.
Only you can say how many times you'll need to use rapids but it may well be less than you think. In the year we've had our inefficient but fast-charging e-tron, we've needed rapids on four journeys of about 1,500 miles total. The car's other 12,000 miles have been powered by 'fast' 7kW charging, overwhelmingly from our home charger at a cost per kWh of about an eighth of that of a good rapid. This would suggest to me that range and the ability to charge ultra-rapidly is less important than one might think.
 

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Skoda Enyaq Sportline 80 (soon...)
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Thing to also watch, rumours from the other MEB platform cars - the upgraded capacity charging cars (100kW and 125kW) are looking likely to be bumped up to 120kW and 150-175kW for the 60/80 respectively. So as they realise you can charge the batteries safely at a higher power, the upgraded cars will move along with these advances. I wouldn't be sure the standard model will get a bump up too.
 

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Kia Soul EV 2020
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I haven't voted, because you don't have the option: will not pay for it.

Looking at my use profile which requires charging away from home on a very few occasions, I don't think the ultra charging speed is essential. I do appreciate that my current car is 70kW maximum though, but I have only seen it max-out even less times than charging away from home.
 

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VW ID3 Tour
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Is 100/125 KW charging ULTRA? I would have thought ultra rapid charging would be a lot higher than that. My car has 125KW charging as standard, I didn't consider that “ultra”.
 

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Skoda Enyaq Sportline 80 (soon...)
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Zapmap has this to say about it:

Rapid DC chargers provide power at 50 kW (125A), use either the CHAdeMO or CCS charging standards

Ultra-Rapid DC chargers provide power at 100 kW or more. These are typically either 100 kW, 150 kW, or 350 kW – though other maximum speeds between these figures are possible.
 

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Thanks, so I have Ultra-Rapid charging then, I didn't know that.
I always thought charging speed was more to do with the size of the battery pack. Smaller battery packs requiring less charging speed to fully charge the pack. Whereas a larger battery pack require a faster charge to get the same result!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I haven't voted, because you don't have the option: will not pay for it.

Looking at my use profile which requires charging away from home on a very few occasions, I don't think the ultra charging speed is essential. I do appreciate that my current car is 70kW maximum though, but I have only seen it max-out even less times than charging away from home.
I guess the issue with adding 'nothing' would be if you have it as standard you may tick the option...I value the feedback though :)
 
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