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Hi. Just bought a Delphi Granny charger from ebay for the zoe, i think Delphi is for the i3??. To my surprise its taking more longer than expected. What does the granny lead charge at KWH? From 30% it said 13 hours for full and in the morning when i woke up it was fully charged. A week ago from 10% it said 15 HOURS! Honestly thought the wire would charge at 3.7Kwh. More like 1.5-2kw an Hour. Thanks.
 

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It’s 10 Amps, so at 240V that’s 2.4 kW.

But the losses can be quite high with the ZOE, so maybe you’ll achieve 2 kW into the battery?
 

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Co-author of CanZE. Q210 nov 2013
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There are three types of "losses", which in all honesty not all are.

1) Conversion losses. The electronics in the car can only be that efficient. There will always be losses. The system is above 90% efficient. At higher power settings that <10% still represents considerable heat. At lower power, well, 10% can easily add up to an hour of charging time. These are true losses. You pay, you make heat.

2) Battery cooling losses. Also the battery generates some heat (which is lost) and then it needs to go somewhere. Usually ZOE copes with it by venting the battery compartment and this doesn't use much energy. However, if it decides the A/C needs to help out, a considerable part of the power will be spent there, chipping away from what's available to go into the battery. CanZE can show the battery cooling mode (none, venting, cooling). These are also true losses.

Note: the front fan running when charging does not imply the A/C is running. It also cools the radiator for the electronics (and motor for the Q models).

3) ZOE has substantial filter capacitors, creating 6 amps of reactive current. These are not losses. It isn't metered and you don't pay for it, but it does limit the real power available for charging. At a 10A setting, only 8A are available (real and reactive should be added as vectors).

There is a misunderstanding about 3) as it is often called "very inefficient", which is not true. We can debate if it's ineffective, but that is another beast. At 10A, the losses on 1) are a bit higher compared to higher power settings, but only slightly, because the charger is basically operating at the edge of it's specs. 2) is a bit of a toss up and is far more dependent on temperature.
 
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