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Discussion Starter #1
Hi All,
I picked up my P- yesterday and am so far thrilled with it! I usually need to change my cars very frequently through the rules of the company schemes so have never bothered with rim protection, however the Model 3 is likely to be a long term keeper, therefore I'm starting to look into it in more detail. I see that there are various stick on / clip on products and that Alloygator seems to be reasonably well thought of, question is, do they fit on the 18" wheels, or will they interfere with the aero covers?

Any thoughts on alloygators or alternatives would be appreciated.

Thanks!
 

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I used Alloygators successfully on our eGolf (except that one of them started to work itself loose) and I believe that they are also compatible with Tesla rims. They inevitably get damaged when you have to change your tyre.

Meanwhile I am intrigued as I have just sprung for Goodyear Ultra-Grip Performance+ winter tyres which claim to include rim protection. Has anyone any experience of how (in)effective tyre-based rim protection is?
 

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Striving for a greener planet
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Alloygators is one of the first things we will get added when the car arrives. Misses insisted on it. And we’ve waited so long for these 19s I’d be darned if I’m not going to treasure them.
point about tyre changes is interesting as we will probably be heading off to the slopes in the M3. I was tossing up between spare set of winter alloys with tyres or just tyres and pay the local fitter to swap them twice a year. Food for thought now...
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Alloygators is one of the first things we will get added when the car arrives. Misses insisted on it. And we’ve waited so long for these 19s I’d be darned if I’m not going to treasure them.
point about tyre changes is interesting as we will probably be heading off to the slopes in the M3. I was tossing up between spare set of winter alloys with tyres or just tyres and pay the local fitter to swap them twice a year. Food for thought now...
My wife is sold on the idea of Alloygators, we'll probably do her car as well. Although I'm a bit disappointed with the suggestion above from Tim that they are damaged when changing the tyres, quite an expense if they need to be replaced every couple of years. Having watched the video, I'm tempted to try and fit them myself, then at least I should have the confidence to remove them just before tyres are replaced.
 

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Is this purely a functional product or does it make the wheels look nicer?
How does the cost of these compare to getting the existing rims/alloys repaired if/when the get kerbed? Or alternatively just taking the WBAC hit when you sell?
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Is this purely a functional product or does it make the wheels look nicer?
How does the cost of these compare to getting the existing rims/alloys repaired if/when the get kerbed? Or alternatively just taking the WBAC hit when you sell?
For me it is mainly functional, but looks "less bad" when the protectors are lightly scuffed, also means that the wheel itself is in good condition when the product is removed.
That said, my wife's last kerbing looked like the car had been savaged by a 'gator, I don't think any protection will help for that type of damage:
IMG_20190424_192726.jpg

The Leaf's wheels are fine as she didn't drive it much, however she is showing more interest in the Tesla, I fear for it's wheels!

You make a fair point, if Alloygators are £160 fitted (seems to be the going rate) and they need to be replaced when the tyres do, then it is a gamble as to whether you think you'll do more damage. The third option is alloy wheel insurance, which someone started a discussion on a few weeks ago:
 

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I should say that the damage to the Alloygators on changing a tyre is not terminal, it just means that they may look a bit scruffier where the cover strip is glued on to cover the join (though the problem is obviously worse if you are dealing with a tyre fitter without experience of them). The other thing about them that is not often mentioned is that they are not suitable for diamond-cut alloys as they can retain water that can creep under the transparent lacquer and cause corrosion. Fortunately this does not apply to Tesla alloys.
 

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For me it is mainly functional, but looks "less bad" when the protectors are lightly scuffed, also means that the wheel itself is in good condition when the product is removed.
That said, my wife's last kerbing looked like the car had been savaged by a 'gator, I don't think any protection will help for that type of damage:
View attachment 123932

The Leaf's wheels are fine as she didn't drive it much, however she is showing more interest in the Tesla, I fear for it's wheels!

You make a fair point, if Alloygators are £160 fitted (seems to be the going rate) and they need to be replaced when the tyres do, then it is a gamble as to whether you think you'll do more damage. The third option is alloy wheel insurance, which someone started a discussion on a few weeks ago:
I saw this and went to read it all then noticed it was me that posted it. It's been a long tiring week.
 
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