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Vauxhall Creak e SE Nav
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I’ve been looking for a replacement to my last EV, and have been offered a brand new vehicle (make and model is irrelevant in this question).
The vehicle is “brand new” and not registered as per the dealer.
The vehicle is in stock at the dealers, but I have refused it because after some detective work I have found out the vehicle was manufactured in February 2020.
Now, if it was an ICE, I would raise an eyebrow and question it, but wouldn’t be massively put off if the price was right.
However as it’s an EV and EV’s seem to be a little bit like a mobile phone in the updating life cycles I was skeptical to purchase it as it has been sat around for so long.
It appears to have very old software versions and is an early build of this vehicle.
So, as per my title, when is a New car, not a new car, as the dealer doesn’t get what I’m on about, and just sees it as a new car because it’s never been registered.
I’ve turned the vehicle down and my hunt continues, but would like other EV owners opinions.
Thanks.
 

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2014 Model S
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Anything manufactured over a year ago is a piss take from a dealer. I wouldn't have an ICE that had sat about for that long either.

You may have to specifically say you want a car that has been manufactured say within the last 9 months or so. I'd think there will be a lot of cars that have been made and just left about the place and now there is huge demand they're dusting them off again. Under 6 months since manufacture is preferable really.
 

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MG ZS EV Exclusive
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If the model is still current and in production what's all the fuss about?
Software can be updated to the current version. Batteries are guaranteed from the date of registration or delivery, whichever is sooner.
In view of the above what are you gaining by rejecting this vehicle?
 
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I’ve been looking for a replacement to my last EV, and have been offered a brand new vehicle (make and model is irrelevant in this question).
The vehicle is “brand new” and not registered as per the dealer.
The vehicle is in stock at the dealers, but I have refused it because after some detective work I have found out the vehicle was manufactured in February 2020.
Now, if it was an ICE, I would raise an eyebrow and question it, but wouldn’t be massively put off if the price was right.
However as it’s an EV and EV’s seem to be a little bit like a mobile phone in the updating life cycles I was skeptical to purchase it as it has been sat around for so long.
It appears to have very old software versions and is an early build of this vehicle.
So, as per my title, when is a New car, not a new car, as the dealer doesn’t get what I’m on about, and just sees it as a new car because it’s never been registered.
I’ve turned the vehicle down and my hunt continues, but would like other EV owners opinions.
Thanks.
How cheap? What's the back story (seems like a covid cancelation) , and what is it? Last of an old model or 1st of a current new model. Has the 2021 spec changed? I might buy it if it was sold at an ex-demo price or big discount.
 

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Of course the dealer's aware of when it was built and how long he's had it in stock. Is it a new car? Is it relevant, as we don't know its price? I wouldn't want it at normal price, but there's always a deal to be done in cases like this. If in doubt, walk away.
 

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Ioniq Project 45, e-Niro4+
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I agree with the above comments, and a full run down on make and spec would be helpful.
Nevertheless, the wait for some 'made to order' cars is long, and getting worse due to the dhip shortage.
I would expect a good discount, and of course, being a 'new' car, it will come with the full manufacturers warranty.
 

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Depends really on whether the spec has changed since it was made, and whether or not age-related battery degradation is an issue. The latter seems to be far less of an issue now than it used to be, as it seems that most batteries made within the last six or seven years degrade mainly from cycling, rather than age. That didn't use to be the case, back when I first started building battery packs age related degradation was often way faster than cycle life degradation.

The other point is that there's no way of knowing, normally, when components were made, so it may well be that many other people are driving around in "new" cars that are, in reality a year or so old. It used to be really common to store new cars for months on disused airfields, and most customers were blissfully unaware of the fact that their "new" car had really been sat parked up for a long time somewhere before they got it.
 

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Nissan Leaf 62Kw, 2021 - Leaf number 6! 2 x Zappi as we are a two Leaf family.
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Manufactures have two years from manufacture to sale for it to be classed as new. Once it gets to two years from manufacture it is effectively scrap and cannot be sold.

This was an issue years ago for volume manufactures, it was all about building cars even if they ended up in fields or on airfields.

VAG were really the first to swap over to the build to order model, followed by others, when I was still working at one of the UK’s largest manufacture they switched to the build to order way of manufacturing, as a JIT manufacture it was a bit odd that they built for stock, but following the demise of an unloved saloon car they moved over to only building what was ordered.

To do this manufacturers have to be lean and very adaptable, as the customer won’t wait forever for a vehicle and is likey to change to another manufacture and then stay there.
 

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Ioniq Project 45, e-Niro4+
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The most under-rated EV ever, the Ampera, sold so poorly at list price that they were heavily discounted after sitting in fields for many months. They're still going strong in may cases and sought after. (Mind you, there the best built car Vauxhall ever sold)
 

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The most under-rated EV ever, the Ampera, sold so poorly at list price that they were heavily discounted after sitting in fields for many months. They're still going strong in may cases and sought after. (Mind you, there the best built car Vauxhall ever sold)

In 2013 I looked at an Ampera, drove all the way to a dealer in Basingstoke to see it. The dealer actively tried to stop me from buying one, even going so far as to refuse to take an order. The dealership wouldn't even let me have a test drive in the one they had in the showroom. I went and bought a Toyota Prius PHEV from Snows in Southampton instead, but regretted not having bought the Ampera, TBH.
 

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Kia E Niro 4
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My current car is not a lot newer than that and if I was offered it now 'as a new' car I wouldn't hesitate if the price was advantageous over a 'brand new' model.
 

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In 2013 I looked at an Ampera, drove all the way to a dealer in Basingstoke to see it. The dealer actively tried to stop me from buying one, even going so far as to refuse to take an order. The dealership wouldn't even let me have a test drive in the one they had in the showroom. I went and bought a Toyota Prius PHEV from Snows in Southampton instead, but regretted not having bought the Ampera, TBH.
Very odd. You’d have enjoyed the Ampera more I’m sure!
 

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A lot of UK built cars in the Seventies had parts which were several years old when new, reflecting the time taken to build them...
 

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There have been pictures in the recent past of cars stockpiled on old airfields, have they now all been sold, seems strange that waiting times to gat a new car are so long if they are all still parked up.
 

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Very odd. You’d have enjoyed the Ampera more I’m sure!
I'm sure you're right. The dealer's behaviour was bizarre. They had an Ampera in the showroom, but kept giving me some cock and bull story about them not being authorised to sell the Ampera, they were only allowed to have it on display. The sales chap tried his hardest to get me to buy any other Vauxhall, and refused point blank to let me buy an Ampera. It was really the most strange behaviour I've ever seen from any car dealer ever.
 

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There have been pictures in the recent past of cars stockpiled on old airfields, have they now all been sold, seems strange that waiting times to gat a new car are so long if they are all still parked up.
Because of the chip shortage, manufactures are only putting the chips into their most profitable models. This means the up market ones where the extra manufacturing cost of the options over the base model is small compared with the larger mark up. So constraining supply as demand is high. Many base models are no longer available or have been priced to choke demand. Profits are now higher on lower volumes which is the opposite of the conventional pre-COVID approach of the industry. The rapid inflation in new car prices is helping narrow the gap between the cost of an ICE and an EV in a bad way for the consumer and a good way for the manufacturer. Take a look at the annual accounts of the big makers and they are doing very much better on lower volumes.

Material shortages means the cost reduction of batteries for EVs is starting to slow down and the market has to be shifted towards accepting more expensive product in EV form as a consequence as the days of ICEs are limited.

ICE prices are rising towards parity with EVs NOT EVs coming down to parity with ICEs.

They are not worried if it means shedding workers as a result of fewer lines and shifts in due course as they will have to do that anyway as an EV takes far less labour to assemble.

Cars are starting to look like a premium product rather than affordable for the masses all over again.

However this could prove to be suicide for the Europeans as it leaves the door wide open for the Chinese to come in with low cost EVs for the mass market.

With constrained supply dealers have no problems shifting stock so dealer discounts from the manufacturers have been slashed. This is clever as it makes the car more profitable to the maker while not directly loading all the increased profit margin on to the price the punter pays. Looks like the days of cheap PCP deals will not be back for a long time if ever.
 

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I'm sure you're right. The dealer's behaviour was bizarre. They had an Ampera in the showroom, but kept giving me some cock and bull story about them not being authorised to sell the Ampera, they were only allowed to have it on display. The sales chap tried his hardest to get me to buy any other Vauxhall, and refused point blank to let me buy an Ampera. It was really the most strange behaviour I've ever seen from any car dealer ever.
I bought a 'new' Citroen in 2004 and much later with a bit of detective work discovered it had been manufactured in 2002. Thankfully I think it had been dry stored but the exhaust did need replacement rather quickly for a 'new' car. Discounts are not charity there is always a reason.
 

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If it’s unregistered and unused, it’s new. If you don’t want it I’m sure they’ll sell it to someone else given the state of new car stock levels.
 
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