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Hyundai Ioniq 38kW EV
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hi all,

Currently a LEAF40 driver and considering changing to a (used) Ioniq EV.

Although my commute is around 20 miles each way (free workplace charging), we do sometimes have some long journeys which require potential rapid charging. I am read that there has been some issues with rapid charging on the new Ioniq, whereby the speed decreases rapidly (sorry, no pun intended) after ca. 60% whereas there is no speed restrictions on the first gen. Based upon this, and the other enhancements, what are your opinions for both? For example, if we had a 300 mile journey, i guess one would need to charge once for 38kW and maybe 2 x for the 28kW - but would the journey time (including factoring in charging) be roughly identical? Are there much benefits opting of the new version vs. the old version?

Also, how reliable are CCS compared to Chadamo? I've not had any issues charging my LEAF (which typically takes 40 minutes to reach 80-85%).

For example, we completed a 1600 mile trip over 12 days without any charging issues in the LEAF, and recently completed 1400 miles, again over 10 days without any issues.

Thanks in advance for any comments!

Kieren
 

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I think you will be fine either way you choose. Go with your gut feeling and wallet. If you prefer to have a proper meal during charging then the 38kWh is better since it will charge for the whole meal and won't need the second charge in the first place.
 

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Happy to do 300 mile journey in 28Kwh, needs a boost at 65m (to get to next best charger), then 90m, 90m, then destination. Just depends where the best chargers are for your journey. EH is very poor for CCS and slow with Ioniq, just 34kWh, however the new 100kW chargers give 67kW at low charge levels so quickly back on the road. Rarely have to wait 40 minutes unless really empty. 38kW seem to have more 12v battery issues giving a flat battery. 30,000 miles and not looking to change.
 

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Hi all,

Currently a LEAF40 driver and considering changing to a (used) Ioniq EV.

Although my commute is around 20 miles each way (free workplace charging), we do sometimes have some long journeys which require potential rapid charging. I am read that there has been some issues with rapid charging on the new Ioniq, whereby the speed decreases rapidly (sorry, no pun intended) after ca. 60% whereas there is no speed restrictions on the first gen. Based upon this, and the other enhancements, what are your opinions for both? For example, if we had a 300 mile journey, i guess one would need to charge once for 38kW and maybe 2 x for the 28kW - but would the journey time (including factoring in charging) be roughly identical? Are there much benefits opting of the new version vs. the old version?

Also, how reliable are CCS compared to Chadamo? I've not had any issues charging my LEAF (which typically takes 40 minutes to reach 80-85%).

For example, we completed a 1600 mile trip over 12 days without any charging issues in the LEAF, and recently completed 1400 miles, again over 10 days without any issues.

Thanks in advance for any comments!

Kieren
Just completed North Yorkshire to Torquay and back for work in a 38kwh. Couple of stops in both directions but found ecotricity to be on free vend and also picked up a couple of ccs charges via polar and instavolt. I don’t find ccs any harder to find than Chademo in my former Leaf. Aware that the 28kwh charges quicker but as 90% of my journeys are sub 170 mile I would always choose the 38 so I don’t have to stop at all.
I miss a handful of things from the Leaf: boot size, gear shift and front charge port but the Ioniq’s efficiency and handling make up for it.
 

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The advantages of the 28kWH are that it´s less expensive and better for the environment in various ways due to smaller battery. For many people it may be the better choice.

However if you need the range get the 38kWH but it doesn´t sound like you do.

I haven´t driven the 38kWH, but it doesn´t sound to me from what I´ve read and graphs I´ve seen that the slow charging speed is all that big of a deal
 

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Both will be fine for you. If you want a new car, then I am pretty sure it will have to be the 38kWh model and there are some great lease deals at the moment for cars in stock as well. If you are considering used, then I expect that it will be the 28kWh model and there are some good prices on the used market considering they were rarer than hens teeth when launched.
 

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Ion, Kona, 16 + 18 + 2020 Soul EV
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Have a look on bjorn Nylands youtube channel. He has videos of both and how they charge and good review of them both. The 28kwh model is an impressive used purchase.
 

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38 will be newer so longer wty. I've had my 38er for 2 days now, proving to be perfect for my regular 160 mile trips in bad weather, so the 28er woud have meant getting wet somewhere at a Rapid probably.
 

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Hyundai Ioniq 38kW EV
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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks all for the comments. Some food for thought here. Both have pro and cons... watch this space...
 

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Ioniq 38kwh 2020
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if you are buying, then the 28 will be a lot cheaper, you'll be lucky to find a 38 for under about £26k. Slightly older 28 you could prob find for £17k now, with decent miles. That's quite a big difference
But it depends on your usage, for general use I'd say either have sufficiently decent range. If you regularly go 150 - 250 miles then the 38 would be better and require fewer (or no) stops. If you do regular 300+ mile trips then the 28 could actually give you faster total journey times but with more stops.
Though there are some good lease deals on the 38, saw one the other day for total under £6k for 2 years, 8000 miles pa.
 

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Do you mean used prices, and is that for both battery sizes?

I have a Leaf currently but may be replacing it soonish. I can comfortably fit a couple of bikes in the boot with the rear seat down, but is that possible in the Ioniq?
 

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Depends on the bikes of course. But if they fit in a Leaf I see no reason why they won't go in an Ioniq. Or of course -------------


 

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Ioniq 38kwh 2020
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Do you mean used prices, and is that for both battery sizes?

I have a Leaf currently but may be replacing it soonish. I can comfortably fit a couple of bikes in the boot with the rear seat down, but is that possible in the Ioniq?
Yeah, should be, it's fairly cavernous with the rear seats down. I fitted one in the other day no issues, though I did take the front wheel off, for ease really, probably didn't need to just didn't want to risk marking the interior!
 

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Thanks, Electrickery and Hitstirrer. Much more information hearing from an actual owner than peering through the rear window....

Still interested to learn whether the price fall is for the 28 or 38, or both. And used or new/both?
 

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Ioniq 38kwh 2020
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Depends on the bikes of course. But if they fit in a Leaf I see no reason why they won't go in an Ioniq. Or of course -------------


I've never liked those types of racks, tried one once and did about 10 miles up a dual carriageway being paranoid it was going to drop the bikes over the road as they bounced about out the back. It always felt that it just needed one big bump or dip in the road and I could be the cause of a major accident!
So I turned back and left the bikes at home! Even over only a few miles of driving it scratched the carbon forks up too.
Far too much risk of damaging the car as well, and you can't get in the boot!
 

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I've also used one of those, got from Halfords. It did the job fine, but as noted you have to ease off the straps & unhook underneath if you want to open the boot. Messy if the road's wet. Also you have to think about where the load goes on to the paintwork; modern paints are water-based & don't seem as robust as the older solvent-based ones from years ago. So quite a risk of abrasion damage I'd say.

Although the Bev Ioniqs are not rated for towing, I believe the chassis has all the mounting points for towbars, and I also believe there's space to fit these even with all the battery stuff in. (The Phev version can tow!). And I'm sure we've seen a piccy of a 28er in USA with a darn long caravan on the back! Probably an aluminium one! So, it just might be feasible to get a towbar fitted & use that with a proper bike carrier, as VW do with the id3 which has a 75 kg limit. I don't know if bike carriers are supposed to have a set of lights+numberplate attached, but I think most people don't bother with these. Provided you don't exceed the car's rated weights, I think this would be a better & safer solution than those strappy-attached things. Technically this can't be construed as towing surely, so I don't think you'd be breaking the homologation rules. But, I Am Not A Lawyer, YMMV, yadda yadda ...
 

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Ioniq
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I can't get bikes in the ioniq in the same way I used to in other cars; the roof is very low at the back, so you have to lie them flat. I used to put them upside down with the forks in the air, but wound down forks or a lowered dropper post are still too tall.

Bike racks are awkward on the ioniq because you're not meant to have any weight on the back window and the body between the two windows at the upper rear of the car is not load bearing either.

This is possibly the biggest disadvantage we've found with the car since we got ours; I currently don't have a way of carrying my bike if there is someone in the back seat.

I'm tempted to try one of the sucker roof carriers, like the seasucker or rock bros ones, to see if they work...
 

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I can't get bikes in the ioniq in the same way I used to in other cars; the roof is very low at the back, so you have to lie them flat. I used to put them upside down with the forks in the air, but wound down forks or a lowered dropper post are still too tall.

Bike racks are awkward on the ioniq because you're not meant to have any weight on the back window and the body between the two windows at the upper rear of the car is not load bearing either.

This is possibly the biggest disadvantage we've found with the car since we got ours; I currently don't have a way of carrying my bike if there is someone in the back seat.

I'm tempted to try one of the sucker roof carriers, like the seasucker or rock bros ones, to see if they work...
given the aero performance of the car, it will be interesting to see what kind of a hit range takes once they are fitted
 
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